dnguyen1969

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Apr 19, 2008
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This may be off the wall, but has anybody think about getting a degree from outside the US (maybe like Australia)? What are the chances of doing that and move back and practice here in the US? Or if you like it over there why not stay.
I know if I am single, I would definitely consider it.

Any thoughts?
 

OhFear

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Mar 12, 2008
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I was born outside of the U.S. (now I'm a US permanent resident) and was considering for a while getting a pharmacy degree in my country of citizenship, Israel. The schools there only offer bachelors of pharmacy programs, which would mean that if I ever wanted to practice in the U.S., I would, most likely, have to complete a non-traditional Pharm.D program first.

Besides that, most universities in Israel don't recognize American high school diplomas (which is what I have), and I would have to do a year of pre-collegiate crap before I could even apply to any degree programs there. So along with some of the ridiculous academic bureaucracy and other personal reasons, I decided to just stick with the U.S. for now. I also figure it would be easier to move a Pharm.D around the world than it would to move a bachelors later on if that's something I wanted to do.

I know that's pretty specific to just one country/situation, so I don't know if that helps you with your thought process at all. Generally, things that I considered were the admissions process, the mobility of the degree, the academic culture (i.e. I felt that U.S. undergrad experience, in particular in 4-year colleges, had a much bigger social aspect to it, and wasn't just focused on academics and career preparation. As opposed to Israeli undergrad, where there really isn't such a thing as "party schools" - again, just a personal preference thing), and to some extent, tuition rates (pretty much the only advantage that I saw in Israeli schools, tuition would've been cheaper for me as an Israeli citizen and as a former combat soldier in the IDF).
 
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dnguyen1969

dnguyen1969

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Thanks for the input. I personally know a few people who moved to Australia and got their degrees in 3 years and decide to stay in Australia because they fell in love with the place.
 

OhFear

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Mar 12, 2008
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Thanks for the input. I personally know a few people who moved to Australia and got their degrees in 3 years and decide to stay in Australia because they fell in love with the place.
That's cool. I've never been to Australia, or know any pharm students out there. I know of one intern that did a rotation in New Zealand (a U.S. pharm student) and he really liked it, and I think that would be a pretty cool experience.
 

tharper14

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Jan 19, 2008
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I posted this a while back, but what the hell...

Australia doesn't offer the same degree for pharmacy as the US as far as I know. When I left (6 yrs now) you only required a B.Pharm or M.Pharm to be a pharmacist. Needless to say, the pay is also lower for pharmacists in Aust. Also, not sure if you could use the B.Pharm or M.Pharm over here to get a job as a pharmacist.
 

tatoflake

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Jun 7, 2007
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It is very difficult for people with a degree from a foreign pharmacy school to get a license in the US. Most countries offer only a BS in pharmacy. In order to sit for the NAPLEX you must hold a PharmD or license from Canada. Check out the National Boards of Pharmacy web site for requirements to sit for the NAPLEX http://www.nabp.net/ befroe you decide to get a degree from another country. :)
 
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dnguyen1969

dnguyen1969

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I wasn't going to uproot everything and move without doing some research first. There were days, I would do that just for the adventure of it. But those days are gone. Everything changes when you have a family in the picture. Thanks for the input though. Actually Canada might be an alternate route.
 

genesis09

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Feb 27, 2006
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The Canada route is no longer valid since January 2003. Prior to then, some of the programs were recognized by ACPE. Since they still use a 4 year bachelors, they are no longer recognized.