anonperson

10+ Year Member
Jun 26, 2008
663
606
Status
Attending Physician
I know this probably pertains to a very small number of people, but I figure it may help some people.

I recently took and passed the written FPMRS board exam. I won't go into any specifics but will discuss the study tools I used and their utility.

Basic info about the test:
230 questions
Some questions are experimental (~10% based on my guess)
240 minutes to complete the exam

Questions:
AUGS has their question bank for sale through their website. It consists of ~700 questions. They are of varying quality, some questions are ok while others are poorly written. The explanations are lacking at times as well. This is unfortunately the main source of questions and your best way to practice for the exam. Since it is written by AUGS members who are also associated with the official exam, there will be some familiar questions.

There is an FPMRS prolog book which is comically short (~50 questions). The book is ok in quality. There are a few errors in the explanations that any fellow should catch pretty easily (ie wrong foramina mentioned for Interstim etc). I can only remember 1 question showing up word for word on the test.

Study material:
AUGS has their yearly review course/study guide. It is expensive and kind of a rip off. I had a copy from a friend. The only really useful section for me was the biostatistics section. It goes over things very well and is essentially structured for the biostats portion of the exam. The other sections are ok but not that useful. You would get better information from reading various textbook chapters (Walter's and Karram).

Review and know the AUA guidelines for OAB/SUI/etc.
At this point, I am unsure how the AUGS statement on workup for microscopic hematuria will work with the AUA guide for microscopic hematuria.

Walters and Karram is the more useful textbook and there was at least 1-2 questions that were taken word for word from some of the chapters. The Rebecca Rogers book is average and may be a bit superficial.

I studied by grinding through questions. I am always paranoid about taking standardized tests and will tend to over prepare. I went through the online question bank and the Prolog book ~6-7 times. Took some notes on weak sections and read pertinent chapters in textbooks as needed. I reviewed the AUA guidelines to make sure I understood/knew the minutiae.

There is some esoteric general urology which is annoying but nothing you can do about it.

Overall the test is fair. Some weird questions but who knows if they are merely experimental. You should be able to finish the test easily within the 4 hour limit.
 

Dr G Oogle

2+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2017
225
272
I know this probably pertains to a very small number of people, but I figure it may help some people.

I recently took and passed the written FPMRS board exam. I won't go into any specifics but will discuss the study tools I used and their utility.

Basic info about the test:
230 questions
Some questions are experimental (~10% based on my guess)
240 minutes to complete the exam

Questions:
AUGS has their question bank for sale through their website. It consists of ~700 questions. They are of varying quality, some questions are ok while others are poorly written. The explanations are lacking at times as well. This is unfortunately the main source of questions and your best way to practice for the exam. Since it is written by AUGS members who are also associated with the official exam, there will be some familiar questions.

There is an FPMRS prolog book which is comically short (~50 questions). The book is ok in quality. There are a few errors in the explanations that any fellow should catch pretty easily (ie wrong foramina mentioned for Interstim etc). I can only remember 1 question showing up word for word on the test.

Study material:
AUGS has their yearly review course/study guide. It is expensive and kind of a rip off. I had a copy from a friend. The only really useful section for me was the biostatistics section. It goes over things very well and is essentially structured for the biostats portion of the exam. The other sections are ok but not that useful. You would get better information from reading various textbook chapters (Walter's and Karram).

Review and know the AUA guidelines for OAB/SUI/etc.
At this point, I am unsure how the AUGS statement on workup for microscopic hematuria will work with the AUA guide for microscopic hematuria.

Walters and Karram is the more useful textbook and there was at least 1-2 questions that were taken word for word from some of the chapters. The Rebecca Rogers book is average and may be a bit superficial.

I studied by grinding through questions. I am always paranoid about taking standardized tests and will tend to over prepare. I went through the online question bank and the Prolog book ~6-7 times. Took some notes on weak sections and read pertinent chapters in textbooks as needed. I reviewed the AUA guidelines to make sure I understood/knew the minutiae.

There is some esoteric general urology which is annoying but nothing you can do about it.

Overall the test is fair. Some weird questions but who knows if they are merely experimental. You should be able to finish the test easily within the 4 hour limit.
Thanks for posting this. Is it anything like the SAFE exam? I found it to be extremely esoteric and almost seemed based on specific study results which were sometimes contradictory.
 
OP
A

anonperson

10+ Year Member
Jun 26, 2008
663
606
Status
Attending Physician
Thanks for posting this. Is it anything like the SAFE exam? I found it to be extremely esoteric and almost seemed based on specific study results which were sometimes contradictory.
Unsure. My program was too behind the ball to get us scheduled for the SAFE exam so I never took it.

Question stems are generally short and to the point for the board exam.
 
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