gracietiger

10+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2009
196
1
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I know this varies from state to state, but I cannot find this info anywhere...

In most states, to gain state residency, one must live in the state continuously for a year. Does this mean no extended out of country travels? If a person moves to a state and lives there for several months - registers to vote, rents an apt, all that - then leaves the country for a couple to a few months but returns to that state, is she not considered a resident of that state since the stay had not been continuous for a year??? If not, is she a resident of the previous state, even if she had not lived there for a year? Or is she state-less?
 

VeganSoprano

Queen of Spayeds
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
May 27, 2004
686
3
39
Washington, DC
Status
I don't think travel counts at all. What matters is where you earn your money, pay your taxes, have your permanent residence, register to vote, etc. That's where you live and where your residency should be.
 
Dec 15, 2009
225
1
Status
I know this varies from state to state, but I cannot find this info anywhere...

In most states, to gain state residency, one must live in the state continuously for a year. Does this mean no extended out of country travels? If a person moves to a state and lives there for several months - registers to vote, rents an apt, all that - then leaves the country for a couple to a few months but returns to that state, is she not considered a resident of that state since the stay had not been continuous for a year??? If not, is she a resident of the previous state, even if she had not lived there for a year? Or is she state-less?
Just a heads up; in many states, 'intent' is a factor. IE - if you move there to attend school, you won't be considered a resident of the state after a year (or even all four) because your intent was to get an education; not to live and work there.

Which means, if you start as an out-of-state student, many schools will have you paying out-of-state tuition for all four years.

At least, that is my understanding.
 

Bill59

Member
10+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2006
990
7
It doesn't depend on the state as much as it depends on the specific university. They are the ones that decide if you are in state or not. And if you are actually making plans for a specific university you HAVE to ask someone at the school.
 

OnceBitten

Mizzou CVM c/o 2013
10+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2008
174
0
Status
Veterinary Student
I would ask the schools you're interested in because I was not allowed to leave the state for longer than 2 weeks when I was gaining residency in Missouri. I also had to prove that I lived here all summer, was collecting paychecks all through my time here, etc., so the regulations do get fairly strict, although I'm sure it varies.
 

Tonkamoo

10+ Year Member
Feb 19, 2008
141
12
Vancouver, BC
Status
Veterinarian
I asked Tufts and Penn this question, and they both implied that travelling for that long would make you not a resident. As someone said - they try to judge your intent, so it if appears you just got an apartment and paid rent so it looks like you live there, then that's no good.

I've heard stories of a cali uni (not a vet school) requiring someone to take money out of an atm in state every two weeks for a year, to prove residency...
 

Kipani

KU c/o 2023
7+ Year Member
Dec 5, 2009
89
62
Kansas
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Definitely contact the schools. I know here in CO, it was almost impossible as someone under the age of 25 -- you are still considered a dependent of your parents unless you can prove that you have completely broken ties. This included things like your parents cannot pay for anything for you including flights anywhere (even as gifts). Basically I was advised to refuse all gift offerings from any resident in Texas, drop any scholarships based out of the state, get a job in the state that was not a job a student might have and not leave for over 2 weeks. This is all in addition to the obvious (DL switch, voter registration, get a lease on an apt, pay taxes to the state).

Personally, I've been in Colorado for the past 4 years and haven't been home more than a month at a time to Texas, but I am still 100% considered a resident of Texas to all schools including non Colorado schools. I'm even registered to vote in Colorado and it doesn't matter, because I came in as an OOS. You're never state-less, as long as you retain a permanent address somewhere, I'd assume. Barring that, other factors likely determine it (DL, leases, etc). But yeah, contact the school specifically. They'll let you know what they're going to take into account to prove your residency.