Dec 14, 2009
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someone explain me net ionic equation for the equation below please: This one is little bit tricky.

BaCO3 (s) + HCl (aq) ->
 

Maygyver

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We need the rest of the equation, and do you mind responding to your other threads?
 

Dion

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someone explain me net ionic equation for the equation below please: This one is little bit tricky.

BaCO3 (s) + HCl (aq) ->
I think this is a double replacement reaction so the Ba will join with the Cl and the H will join with the CO3. The products of the reaction are therefore BaCl2 and HCO3. To do the net ionic equation, we split apart HCL to its constituent ions H+ and Cl- for the reactants. We do not do anything to BaCO3. Next, we split apart BaCl and HCO3 to Ba2++ and Cl and H+ and CO3.

Our equation now looks like:
BaCO3 (s) + H+ + Cl- -> Ba2+ + Cl- + H+ + CO3-

Then we cross out those ions that appear on both sides, so H and Cl are gone and that leaves us with

BaCO3 (s) -> Ba2+ + CO3-
 
Dec 29, 2009
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Hey Kpark! you forgot about Cl! so the answer is:
right side: Ba2+ , 2Cl- + H2O(l) + CO2(g)
 

flybry2000

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This is from topscore test #1 isn't it? There GC seems to be a little harder than usual yeah?
 

Maygyver

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yeah please explain me how the reaction occur in that way !
Well, since you didn't respond again, I'll just take a stab at it. Basically, you just have to know that bicarbonate gas forms and then work from there. Once you figure that out it's pretty easy.
 

UndergradGuy7

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You have to know that BaCO3 + 2HCl -> BaCl2 + CO2 +H2O


If you are given this
BaCO3 (s) + HCl (aq) ->

You know that Ba is 2+, so if it were a replacement reaction you would form BaCl and you would need 2 Cl2. So to balance the reactants BaCO3 (s) + 2 HCl (aq) ->
So now we know we will form BaCl2 and you would think we form H2CO3, but you just have to know that instead of that you make H2O and CO2. This is because H2CO3 is unstable and forms CO2 and H2O. It is just something you have to know I think.

So now you can do what Dion explained. BaCO3 is a solid. H2O is a liquid and CO2 is a gas. HCl and BaCl2 are aqueous. You have to know the solubility table for this.

BaCO3(s) + 2H+ + 2Cl- -> CO2(g) + H2O(l) + Ba + 2Cl-
The 2 Cl- cancel
You should get
BaCO3(s) + 2H+ -> CO2(g) + H2O(l) + Ba

Right?
It was a tricky one.