General Practice?

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GonnaBeAnMD

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How does one become a "general practitioner"? Was there a residency before called General Practice? Also, is FM the shortest residency or is there a shorter one? Thanks!

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I think that general practitioners became physicians after only doing an internship year. They did not go on to do any residency. I don't think this is allowed anymore.

And for the second part of your question, FP, IM, and Peds are all 3 year residencies. So FP is one of the shortest residencies.
 
There is a shorter one. It's called, PA or NP.

EH
 
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Word to that!

As a non-trad pre-med, I'm finding that I'm on this pendulum where one day I think, "I want to run an ED someday. I want to be the boss. I'm totally doing med school." And the next day I think, "screw 80-hour weeks. I don't want to be a small business-owner. I don't want to deal with over-competitive classmates. I don't want to compete for the chance to go compete more. I just want to take care of patients. Gimme that Anatomy class; I'm going to PA school." My MD friends tell me it only sucks for a short time, and it's worth it. My PA friends point out they get more sleep than my MD friends. ;)

If old-skool GP seemed like a viable choice anywhere except Frostbite Falls, Minnesota, then that might work.
 
DOtobe said:
general practitioners became physicians after only doing an internship year. They did not go on to do any residency. I don't think this is allowed anymore.

It's certainly allowed (in most states) from a licensure point of view. Residents who moonlight under a permanent license are essentially being GP's. In terms of a long-term practice, hospital privileges, malpractice insurance and preferred provider status are hard to come by without finishing a residency.
 
Febrifuge said:
Word to that!

As a non-trad pre-med, I'm finding that I'm on this pendulum where one day I think, "I want to run an ED someday. I want to be the boss. I'm totally doing med school." And the next day I think, "screw 80-hour weeks. I don't want to be a small business-owner. I don't want to deal with over-competitive classmates. I don't want to compete for the chance to go compete more. I just want to take care of patients. Gimme that Anatomy class; I'm going to PA school." My MD friends tell me it only sucks for a short time, and it's worth it. My PA friends point out they get more sleep than my MD friends. ;)

If old-skool GP seemed like a viable choice anywhere except Frostbite Falls, Minnesota, then that might work.


Old school GP-type jobs exist all over the place, but they are generally meant to serve as a bridge for residents who are moonlighting. I have never heard of anyone taking a full-time locums-type position and leaving their residency. One thing to think about though is that if you are having second thoughts now about PA vs. MD, then you might find the second thoughts getting worse with time!! Read my screenname once again :)
 
Lot of people and organiztions try to link the GP and FM doc together and they really shouldn't.

In addition to many of the above listed reasons to complete residency, most insurance companies will not credential you unless you are BC/BE. I only get by being a "GP" while moonlighting because I am still in residency, therefor the insurance companies will accept the billing for my moonlighting services as a "GP".
 
If a physician wants to go into private practice and do a cash only vein/tattoo/wrinkle removal business, is GP still around to fulfill that field?
 
you don't even need to be a physician to do that!

Just kidding. Seriously though, I know you don't need a medical license to run the laser for tattoo removal and spider veins (according to the last GP I rotated with who used one). He was bummed because he's not the only game in town any more with his laser. Beauty salons are getting them. And aren't there "Botox" parties where they get together and do the wrinkle thing? Not sure how all that comes into play.

I have a friend that went through a residency program that shut down early - not sure of the details - but he decided not to continue his FP training (which makes him a GP) and now is into selling some anti-aging supplement in Florida. He pulls in 20K per month. But he's cut off a considerable amount of options mentioned above for himself and it seems to me the supplements and such are usually trends that fade with time.

My question is, do you (or whoever) want to practice medicine? There are ways to supplement incomes but IMO docs are hamstringing themselves if they don't get the training for proper board certification. Why not have the option to be a cash doc instead of forcing yourself to be one because no insurance co's or hospitals will look at you.

My $.02
 
PACtoDOC said:
One thing to think about though is that if you are having second thoughts now about PA vs. MD, then you might find the second thoughts getting worse with time!! Read my screenname once again
Well, see, there's an excellent point. For the modern pre-med who values flexibility and options, PA is attractive because one could switch areas of practice without going backward for more training. A few years in EM, have some kids, switch to FP, maybe move over to Ortho or something too. MD/DO can feel like boxing oneself in. Except of course that as a PA, the box is actually on the other side; there are always going to be things you need to hand off to the 'expert' MD/DO you work with.

Plus, as this thread shows, resident moonlighting can be quite GP-like, and there are always side projects - and you never know what funky body-mod might be trendy in a few years. Heck, in a college town an enterprising person could build a rep as "the piercing doc." There's one tattoo and piercing place in my town that has their own autoclave. Discriminating punkers go there, and spend a lot of money.

So, yeah. There are ways to fight boredom and keep the options open, whatever level one is at. FP is adapting and evolving, and there's no reason to think any individual with some creativity couldn't create a career path that does something similar.
 
To thanks and Pilot doc!

I went to medical school as a second option. Ive always wanted to be an aviator. Weird huh? But then in high school I had myopia. There were no laser treatments back then, and if there was I couldnt afford one. Now that Im done with medical school. I wanna enjoy my passion as an aviator. I thought I could never practice medicine without going to residency, and then I read your post. Thanks you guys! I dont care if Im a general practitioner. My future patients will be the judge on how I practice my medicine. The best part of doing this is I get to enjoy flying and practicing medicine at the same time.

Thanks! :)
 
docrjay said:
To thanks and Pilot doc!

I went to medical school as a second option. Ive always wanted to be an aviator. Weird huh? But then in high school I had myopia. There were no laser treatments back then, and if there was I couldnt afford one. Now that Im done with medical school. I wanna enjoy my passion as an aviator. I thought I could never practice medicine without going to residency, and then I read your post. Thanks you guys! I dont care if Im a general practitioner. My future patients will be the judge on how I practice my medicine. The best part of doing this is I get to enjoy flying and practicing medicine at the same time.

Thats funny, I have a similar story - was halfway through a pilot's license when I was deciding between med school and undergrad pilot training. marriage and a new baby influenced the decision and I went for med. So then I was strongly considering flight surgery with the Air Force as a GMO (GP) but since I've decided to go with FP/sports med. Not sure if you know it or not but the Navy flight surgeons are required to go through flight training to get their own licence.

I'll pick up flying someday. Long story, I know. Good luck to you.
 
All...GPs are reimbursed at the same rate as FPs, and covered by all insurance plans, ALL. Hospital Priviledges are harder, it's not b/c of knowledge, it's the hospitals way of Making more money on inpatients. Let the Hospitalist have it. I see my patients at a smaller hospital the I have Priviledges at. I finished an American MD school in 2009, did my 1 year of residency, and now run my own practice and accept all insurers!!! It rocks, and I saved 2 years of BS 80hour weeks at $5/hour wages!!!
 
All...GPs are reimbursed at the same rate as FPs, and covered by all insurance plans, ALL. Hospital Priviledges are harder, it's not b/c of knowledge, it's the hospitals way of Making more money on inpatients. Let the Hospitalist have it. I see my patients at a smaller hospital the I have Priviledges at. I finished an American MD school in 2009, did my 1 year of residency, and now run my own practice and accept all insurers!!! It rocks, and I saved 2 years of BS 80hour weeks at $5/hour wages!!!

Aren't you only able to get licensure in certain states though? Granted, the majority of states only require 1 year for an unrestricted license but all it takes is an act of legislature to put you out of business if you haven't completed a 3 year residency.
 
Alot if state have even changed the rules for FMGs, so that they have to only do their intern year, GA and Cali just changed for sure. The state medical societies would rather have MDs in practice than doctor nurses with their online degrees, what a joke, anyways I see more states recruiting GPs to see their pts, Obomacare With 30+million new pts, who is going to see them? The nursing board is ahead if the curve by pumping out online trained NPs/DNPs as fast as they can. AMA and others better get on board. They have increased enrollment by 20% but residency spots have not increased...not good
 
Blue Dog et al,

I am not bashing FP, just letting folks now that GP's is alive and well. I was in a 5 year residency, family situation changed and I needed to focus on them. So I am not stupid or lazy, as some of you might think. And all GP's in the past were grandfathered into FP, with never doing a FP residency. I never thought I would not finish residency, but there I sat. I made GP work for me and was surprised that it did work. I want others to know its a viable choice for those that cant or dont wish to complete a 3 year residency. I think that youll see more GPs, as Doctor nurses and PAs complete 'training' in 1-2 years and compared to our 5-7, post grad, and are licensed to ALL FP/GP services. Sad, but reality.
 
Ok.

As BlueDog points out, this IS the Family Medicine forum; i.e. for people who have, are in the process of, or are thinking about, completing a family medicine residency. The point about General Practice has been made, and I think it's sufficient to leave it at that. Rather than let the discussion become more belabored than it already has, I'm closing the thread. Any further discussion about General Practice, and not Family Medicine, will be directed to other forums.

Thanks.
 
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