Genetics question

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mitchlucker

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This is a strange question, but please bear with me.

Say non-disjunction occurs in a male on a given autosome. For example, chromosome 10. Therefore, the gametes produced will be 2 normal, 1 diploid and 1 that is missing this autosome.

This person mates with a female who has a similar issue on the same chromosome.

The diploid gamete joins with the gamete that is completely missing the same autosome.

Would this yield a completely functioning offspring? Just the exact same information from the parent who provided the diploid?

Also, would the answer be the same if it was applied to the sex chromosomes?

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In the case you have described above, there would not be a surviving offspring. Look into Prader-Willi/ Angelman Syndromes: they are genetic diseases caused by imprinting on a small section of chromosome 15q.

Genetic imprinting refers to the offspring receiving two copies of the same gene from one parent, and none from the other. Since it has not been reported in an entire chromosome, it is safe to say right now that the nondisjunction you described is not compatible with life.

The scenario would not happen with sex chromosomes either: YY individual is not compatible with life since the X chromosome contains many valuable genes necessary for survival. An XX individual with both Xs being maternal has been clinically described. It is refered to as a molar pregnancy and is spontanously aborted early on.

Hope that helps :D
 
In the case you have described above, there would not be a surviving offspring. Look into Prader-Willi/ Angelman Syndromes: they are genetic diseases caused by imprinting on a small section of chromosome 15q.

Genetic imprinting refers to the offspring receiving two copies of the same gene from one parent, and none from the other. Since it has not been reported in an entire chromosome, it is safe to say right now that the nondisjunction you described is not compatible with life.

The scenario would not happen with sex chromosomes either: YY individual is not compatible with life since the X chromosome contains many valuable genes necessary for survival. An XX individual with both Xs being maternal has been clinically described. It is refered to as a molar pregnancy and is spontanously aborted early on.

Hope that helps :D

Thanks a lot. Exactly the information I was looking for!
 

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