getting into a BSN program w/ out a RN license

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PharmDr.

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After talking w/ a couple NP's (2 guys and a women) I have decided that becoming a NP is what I have been looking for. I want to have a Dr.s duties but without all the extra headaches. I dont care if im the head dog in the food chain, just that I can practice what I know and refer all that I am not comfortable with. I can live hapily with their salary also. So, I was wondering how hard is it to get into a BSN program if you dont have your RN? My GPA is 3.1 and that includes courses that I dont apply to nursing req. like chem 1 and 2 and Bio 1. I have been told that withdrawls are not looked at when trying to get into a undergraduate program but I have 1 already and thinking about withdrawling from Org. Chem 1 and Pre-Calc. since I dont need these classes and would give me less headaches this semester. Is this correct about withdrawls? I know I need nutrition and Development of life span as well as stat. I can get very good letters of rec. from either the NP's I know or from pharmacists since I have worked as a pharm tech for 2 yrs. Is a current 3.1 GPA good enough to get into one of these programs or am I going to waste my money applying to a bunch of these programs in my state of florida?

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deleted6669

most folks who enter bsn programs have no prior health care experience so it should not be an issue.
 

chicoborja

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I'm not a nurse or nursing student but at one point in the past it was something I looked into rather thoroughly so I think I might have some somewhat accurate info for you. First I'm assuming that you do not already have a bachelor's and are going the BSN then MSN route (4 years) as opposed to the BSN/MSN combined route (3 years) which is for lateral entry students that already have completed an undergraduate degree. In regards to what I am about to tell you, it is my opinion and mainly based on my local geographical area. I'm not sure if you're a guy or girl but if you're a guy thats a plus. Also if you're a minority, that too helps. I've been told that the nursing field is attempting to become less homogenous and better represented in regards to sex and ethnicity. Regardless of that, private schools will likely be easier to get in to. This isnt because they're not as good by any means but rathers because fewer students apply because of the much higher costs. With regard to your GPA, 3.1 I believe is a bit low for nursing but thats prob because you've actually taken the hard science classes. Nutrition, developmental psych, and maybe stats should raise your GPA a bit. Oh, just a side note, I'd take the stats class in your psych dept rather than the math dept. I think the grading may be a bit easier and also they may tend to focus on application (e.g., SPSS) more than number punchin. My advice is to try to boost your GPA with the pre-nursing classes and if you can afford it, apply to private/christian colleges.
 
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aidan73

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I know that UT-Houston and UTMB-Galveston have a joint program where you can get your BSN if you already have your bachelors (in another discipline). Its a year long program (Summer/Fall/Spring). There might be other similar programs at other schools.

UTMB School of Nursing - Bacc2 Program
 

ayndim

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In my neck of the woods sometimes we hear that a 3.8 is not going to get you in and other semesters 3.0 can get in. It all depends on the GPA of the others who are applying. Good news is the cc's/jc's don't usually count GPA's as long as you meet the minimum (here anyway). I am doing the cc route because it is cheaper (and I am paying out of pocket). Then again I do have a BS so I am not that concerned. Also, I can always do a RN to BSN if I need a BSN in the future. Much cheaper as the hospital will often pay for it.

You just never know. I say give it a shot and also apply to the cc as a backup.

Good luck
 
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