axeon123

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I'm looking for a dense (maybe?) 'pocketbook' to read for IM. If there's downtime or I want to look up info about a disorder, how to treat/manage, complications, etc, and do not have access to a computer. Something that has plenty of info. I looked at Washington Manual and Ferri and I seemed to like Ferri's layout better. But I haven't had time to really read from each book and see which works better. What does everyone here think?
 
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axeon123

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That is true. I have the pocket medicine book. I just wanted a carryable resource I can take out and read. Not as big as a huge textbook like Harrison or whatnot.
 

Jolie South

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That is true. I have the pocket medicine book. I just wanted a carryable resource I can take out and read. Not as big as a huge textbook like Harrison or whatnot.

meh, I would just stick to what I said for your patients and then do tons of questions (UWorld, MKSAP) after work to study for the shelf.
 

OveractiveBrain

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Pocket Medicine is the best resource as a pocket guide provided you have the knowledge to interpret the code. Its in a note format that may go over your head if you aren't familiar with the information. You will buy this book eventually, especially for your intern year, regardless of your specialty choice.

Case Files is a better resource if you are an average student trying to prepare for the shelf while on the wards. It does not have the depth you crave, but is more appropriate for ward-reading.
 

jdh71

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There's always the WashU Manual . . . or even a pocket Harrison's . . .

Your school bookstore should have both. Go look at them, if you like them, find one online.

You can also get the UCSF Hospitalist handbook for your PDA (use teh google). You may even be able to get a hard copy from their bookstore online, but I haven't tried to find one in a few years.

I personally do not recommend anything more than has already been recommended though. Pocket Medicine and Case Files.
 

KnuxNole

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Is Step Up to Medicine a good book to bring to the wards to study on the downtime, or is that too bulky and should be left home?
 

Law2Doc

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Is Step Up to Medicine a good book to bring to the wards to study on the downtime, or is that too bulky and should be left home?
Too big -- won't fit in the pockets of the white coat.
I echo the suggestion that the Pocket Medicine (by Sabatine at MassGen) is the IM portable book of choice. That and epocrates should be all the references you need on you. If you are considering going into an IM field, I would probably recommend having Harrisons or Cecils handy at home to "read up" on patient issues; if not, do what you can with the online service I'm sure your hospital subscribes to.
 

McGillGrad

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Too big -- won't fit in the pockets of the white coat.
I echo the suggestion that the Pocket Medicine (by Sabatine at MassGen) is the IM portable book of choice. That and epocrates should be all the references you need on you. If you are considering going into an IM field, I would probably recommend having Harrisons or Cecils handy at home to "read up" on patient issues; if not, do what you can with the online service I'm sure your hospital subscribes to.
+1

Plus uptodate.com for a quick brush-up throughout the day.