Gross anatomy

Discussion in 'General International Discussion' started by Student247, Sep 28, 2002.

  1. Student247

    Student247 Member

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    Strange question, but I was curious. Do med schools in the carribean use cadavers or plastic models in gross anatomy? The reason I ask is because it seems to indicate the latter on the course description of St. Matthews gross anatomy class. If anyone knows first hand (of either all the schools or just st. Matthews) I would appreciate your insight. Thanks.

    Student247
     
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  3. Skip Intro

    Skip Intro Registered User

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    Ross University uses real cadavers. I know from a friend that St. Georges does as well. I don't know about the rest of the Caribbean medical schools.

    At Ross, as well, there is a Anatomy Resources Learning Center that has a limited number of models of skeletons and plastic body systems, if you want to look at those as study aids too. The downside is that there were nine of us assigned to one cadaver. I only dissected one week out of every three in a small group of three. But, we were required to go in each week, review what had been done, and were quizzed on what the other groups had dissected. Gross Anatomy is taught in 2nd semester, too (which is okay - maybe even better - because it overlaps nicely with Physiology and Neuroanatomy).
     
  4. Stephen Ewen

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    In my knowledge, all the carib schools save St. Mat, and IUHS's essenatially "distance" med edu, use cadavers. Using them is simply well considered "standard" in med edu, so it is only those who consider themselves to have an articulated and pretty strong rationale who choose otherwise--it is only those who choose to go "off the beaten path" and, perhaps (but perhaps not) "innovate" who forego the cadavers.

    Purely opinion wise (and/though most will roundly agree; and though this is not directed anywhere but "generally"), I think that the more modalities you can use in learning anatomy, the better.

    Possible applications of this assertion are:

    -- Don't forego ADAM software, and don't forego a systems based anatomy textbook, in addition to whichever regionally-based text is required by your school. Personally, I love ADAM, as well as, for example, the whole "Rediculously Simple" series (CLICK HERE to find such titles) including the anatomy one (Ah! At last! Some excellent pedagogy!:cool:--a relative rarity in med school).

    --Use modalities related to your hands, your eyes, your ears, as well as relational [social], and individualistic ones; and, just as importantly, in various combinations of all five. This is, I think, so very key. CLICK HERE TO SEE A REPLY TO A BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL ARTICLE where I argue this (though I profoundly feel that experimentation with "distance" and other edu models should be carried out--who knows but that an excellent result will come?)

    On the other hand, St. Mat argues that the value of cadavers diminishes when the cadavers are not professionaly prosected, which plastinated models essentially are, though, arguably "stylized." This is as opposed to the highly variable student disections. (My opinion: good point, especially if practical exams must, for the very most part, be carried out upon student disections during a given semester).

    Yet, the ideal med school might consider using, or at least well facilitating, all possible modalities in their teaching (and testing) of anatomy (etc.), and not choosing between and among them.

    But, and either way, and as the sound adage (an adage with good merit) goes, and though this does not negate the need for excellent pedagogy, your [the student's] initiative is a main thing. So I suppose we could say that, "any way you slice it," your initiative to learn, no matter where you are at school-wise, is a main thing :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :eek: ;)

    Add in:

    And since I am kind of harping a bit on med edu here...let me just add here that I think it is needless, and perhaps irresponsible, and in any event less-than-desirable, in the overall scheme of things, for schools to squeeze anatomy into ONE semester.

    Egypt, if I recall the exact details correctly, teaches anatomy over THREE YEARS of their seven year progam! Why have they chosen this? What is their rationale? Does it have good merit? Is it applicaple to other med edu systems? How so? In what measure? (I would be eager to discuss these questions in this or another thread). Either way, med schools could at least teach anatomy over one year (one academic year, i.e., two semesters)...that is, if they place pedagogy over budgets, or worse, over convenience, and allow the rest of the curriculum to be in kind. Also, does systems-based, overall, trump regional-based learning in anatomy?

    If you can't tell already, and personally speaking, I think sound pedagogy is something med schools need to pay more attention to, though we are light years ahead of where we have been...and thank you to those who give a primary atention to this. And for those who perhaps don't in measure enough...simply put, there is a niche for you to develop more upon.
     
  5. The Pill Counter

    The Pill Counter Senior Member

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    Stephen makes a good point of using varied approaches. We did dissections on the thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and then viewed prosected specimens of the head and neck and studied from plastinated specimens for upper and lower limbs. Seems to have worked well
     
  6. Stephen Ewen

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    Which school in Oz are you at? Or are you?

    Either way, I think Oz is wonderful, not only pedagogically-speaking, but in that they are a model for others of taking less than purely interest-based research into med edu pedagogy, and turning it into legislation.

    This is especially true considering the move for appropriate cultural relativism regarding Aboriginal conceptions in the general Oz political culture, as well as in the Oz legal system.

    As an example of part of the above, consider the recent opening of a med progam (I forget the name--it is on the tip of my tongue) in North Australia where they accept only rural-oriented, and preferably aboriginal, nearby residents. And the whole ethos of it, besides.
     
  7. The Pill Counter

    The Pill Counter Senior Member

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    I'm at University of Queensland in Brisbane. You may be referring to James Cook University in North Queensland, it's a new program focused on rural health. Aboriginal students still only make up a very small precentage of the class.
     
  8. Stephen Ewen

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    Yes, James Cook is exactly the school I am referring to. Thanks for the "memory jar." Are you a US citizen at U of Q? Or other?
     
  9. The Pill Counter

    The Pill Counter Senior Member

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    I'm dual Brit/Can, there's only one American, couple of other Canadians, but several dual Aus/American, who aren't international students obviously.
     
  10. Skip Intro

    Skip Intro Registered User

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    I'm not sure if it's really a "progressive" vs. a cost issue for a lot of Carib schools. Either way, we had an AWESOME anatomist doing prosections for us. Even during the weeks one didn't dissect, you'd still show-up for the prosections.

    -Skip
     

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