Jun 23, 2014
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Do high school grades get factored into the admission process? My grades were atrocious... i mean its embarrassing to say. I took almost four years off before going back to school. I had to get my transcript in order to transfer to a university and i really forgot how bad it really was. Now I'm concerned its going to affect me.
 

mw18

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Unless you got a felony in high school, they don't care. At all.
 

Banco

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Did you have college courses you took in HS (like via dual enrollment)? Those do count.

Regular HS courses? No, they don't count. Thank god.
 
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OP
Dr.kennethnoisewater
Jun 23, 2014
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No i never took college classes in H.S. But that is reliving to hear. I think I had to try to do as bad as i did.
 

NotASerialKiller

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I failed a lot of classes in high school because I didn't care. Completely turned it around in university for a very competitive GPA.

I'm not saying though, that it won't affect you at all. If you weren't trying in high school (like me), it's not always easy to turn around and be able to study hard enough to excel. You're probably going to have to put in more work than your peers who are used to studying. It's a skill like anything else; you have to get your study chops back.
 

Gandyy

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High School is a Joke and Public education in the United States is a Joke. Thus, adcoms treat High School Grades as a Joke.
 

md-2020

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High School is a Joke and Public education in the United States is a Joke. Thus, adcoms treat High School Grades as a Joke.
I think public schools do a great job in the US, especially considering their limited resources and lack of tuition. Having been to public middle school and then private high school, I think that a free public secondary education is one of the most worthwhile deals you'll ever find. My private education encompassed a lot of outdated rules/formalities/traditions that honestly aren't practical unless you plan on being a socialite your entire life. It was also quite expensive.

Nice capitalization btw
 

Gandyy

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I think public schools do a great job in the US, especially considering their limited resources and lack of tuition. Having been to public middle school and then private high school, I think that a free public secondary education is one of the most worthwhile deals you'll ever find. My private education encompassed a lot of outdated rules/formalities/traditions that honestly aren't practical unless you plan on being a socialite your entire life. It was also quite expensive.

Nice capitalization btw
You havent been to run down public schools in rural communities in the Midwest then. Not all public education is equal.

Now MD 2020 I like you man, but how can you possibly know what a public high school education is really like when you went to a private school?


Let me tell you something about John Deere Tractorville High Schools. Our AP biology class consisted of doing coloring books and playing chess.

Our calculus class consisted of playing video games on the teacher's computer while he went to the "bathroom" for an hour.

We didnt have a general chemistry class... we had to PETITION to get REAL science courses in our classes.


Point is many of the public schools in the Midwest... especially rural towns are a complete utter joke.

Oh I forgot to add how bringing in Spanish Dictionaries to donate gave you enough bonus points to bring you up from a D to an A in Spanish 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Good Game, Podunkville education.
 
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Planes2Doc

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Nope. Also, I know people who transferred from community colleges to first-tier universities. Any academic mistakes you made in high school will eventually not matter.
 

NotASerialKiller

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You havent been to run down public schools in rural communities in the Midwest then. Not all public education is equal.

Now MD 2020 I like you man, but how can you possibly know what a public high school education is really like when you went to a private school?


Let me tell you something about John Deere Tractorville High Schools. Our AP biology class consisted of doing coloring books and playing chess.

Our calculus class consisted of playing video games on the teacher's computer while he went to the "bathroom" for an hour.

We didnt have a general chemistry class... we had to PETITION to get REAL science courses in our classes.


Point is many of the public schools in the Midwest... especially rural towns are a complete utter joke.

Oh I forgot to add how bringing in Spanish Dictionaries to donate gave you enough bonus points to bring you up from a D to an A.

Good Game, Podunkville education.
I don't know, public school in Canada taught me how to use a lightbulb to smoke meth!

Apart from that I thought they did quite well, no part of university chemistry/physics/calculus wasn't taught at my high school. Also @md-2020 I think the capitalization issue doesn't support the idea that public schools do a good job :p
 
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md-2020

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You havent been to run down public schools in rural communities in the Midwest then. Not all public education is equal.

Now MD 2020 I like you man, but how can you possibly know what a public high school education is really like when you went to a private school?


Let me tell you something about John Deere Tractorville High Schools. Our AP biology class consisted of doing coloring books and playing chess.

Our calculus class consisted of playing video games on the teacher's computer while he went to the "bathroom" for an hour.

We didnt have a general chemistry class... we had to PETITION to get REAL science courses in our classes.


Point is many of the public schools in the Midwest... especially rural towns are a complete utter joke.

Oh I forgot to add how bringing in Spanish Dictionaries to donate gave you enough bonus points to bring you up from a D to an A.

Good Game, Podunkville education.
Well I went to public K-8 and you mentioned that "public education in the US is a joke," so I applied my pre-HS experiences there.
For HS, I had many friends in public schools, and the general consensus was that it was a fine education.

I see that some public schools do not match up to the quality of those in my area, which were respectable.

I do seem to have overestimated the uniformity of educational standards across the country, your school included. But I'm sure the inner-city ghettos probably had it worse, so don't feel too bad.

Also, I know people who transferred from community colleges to first-tier universities.
Gonna be 100% honest, not a huge fan of those people.
 

Gandyy

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Well I went to public K-8 and you mentioned that "public education in the US is a joke," so I applied my pre-HS experiences there.
For HS, I had many friends in public schools, and the general consensus was that it was a fine education.

I see that some public schools do not match up to the quality of those in my area, which were respectable.

I do seem to have overestimated the uniformity of educational standards across the country, your school included. But I'm sure the inner-city ghettos probably had it worse, so don't feel too bad.

The bolded part above is probably true. So then my point is exactly what you say.... "uniformity of educational standards across the country" is not uniform.
 

gannicus89

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If you took college classes during high school, they DO get factored in. It sucks.
 

Goro

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What happened in high school stays in school.


Do high school grades get factored into the admission process? My grades were atrocious... i mean its embarrassing to say. I took almost four years off before going back to school. I had to get my transcript in order to transfer to a university and i really forgot how bad it really was. Now I'm concerned its going to affect me.
 

GiveMeThatMD

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What happened in high school stays in school.
Except herpes, that stays with you forever. On a serious note OP, I dropped out of high school, and once enrolled in college, no one batted an eye. Admissions aren't going to give a damn.
 
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Banco

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CC=easy
2 years of CC=much higher GPA
Degree=same as everyone slaving away since day 1 at the tough school
Getting into high tier school = not easy at all. You generally have to be exceptional to be accepted as a transfer from a CC; if the CC transfers do well at the tougher school, what's the problem? The administration obviously deemed them qualified enough to attend the school. The value of the degree does not come from how many years it took to attain it.
 
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md-2020

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Getting into high tier school = not easy at all. You generally have to be exceptional to be accepted as a transfer from a CC; if the CC transfers do well at the tougher school, what's the problem? The administration obviously deemed them qualified enough to attend the school. The value of the degree does not come from how many years it took to attain it.
I'm in no way saying CC transfers are less qualified/able to succeed.

Just that the GPA/stress advantage they have makes me quite envious :D
 
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allantois

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I think public schools do a great job in the US, especially considering their limited resources and lack of tuition. Having been to public middle school and then private high school, I think that a free public secondary education is one of the most worthwhile deals you'll ever find. My private education encompassed a lot of outdated rules/formalities/traditions that honestly aren't practical unless you plan on being a socialite your entire life. It was also quite expensive.

Nice capitalization btw
I'm willing to bet that U.S. schools are the most overfunded in the world. It's the horrible use of resources which is the problem. Kind of like healthcare, everybody could be getting better care for lesser price. Also, I'm not aware of any countries, except maybe the most unfortunate ones, which do not guarantee its citizens public secondary schooling, so I'm not sure what that comment on tuition was all about.
 
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Dr.Sticks

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No..
Nothing you did in High School matters.. How popular you were, your volunteer activities, etc..
Well they matter for college, but after that nobody cares. A HS diploma from a 40k a year prep school will be treated the same as a HS diploma from a public run down high school in the inner city..
You could do 2.0 gpa in HS, and get the bare minimum on the SAT go to a community college turn your academics completely around and go to a top 50 public university.. Then from there go to a top 5 medical school, enter into a prestigious residency and start a prestigious academic career.

To prove my point; Dr.Q from Hopkins was an illegal migrant worker who started out taking night classes..
Let me quote his wiki for you
"Quiñones-Hinojosa started his education at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, California, and completed his bachelor's degree in psychology with the highest honors at University of California, Berkeley.[4] He then went on to receive his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, where he graduated with honors. He also became a US citizen during this time.[7] He then completed his residency in neurosurgery at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental and stem cell biology at the laboratory of Professor Arturo Álvarez-Buylla."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfredo_Quinones-Hinojosa#Education
 
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I'm in no way saying CC transfers are less qualified/able to succeed.

Just that the GPA/stress advantage they have makes me quite envious :D
I don't know. I feel like everyone's happy day comes. While you were accepted to college right away there was that one kid that didn't and ended up going to a community college. Just because you think comm college is hard it doesn't mean that for that kid that statement held true. The fact that they end up in a great college afterwards is great in my opinion but remember that while you must have already got accommodated to your college academia that kid had to work an uphill battle (play russian roullette to gamble for a top position and then in eventuality get used to the college in just a matter of 1-2 years). So I don't know what stress advantage you are talking about; maybe if you had started comm college and then gone that would have been easy but then why would you do that having had greater qualifications? If you ask any comm college person if they would have liked to start there, I don't think you would have many people say yes if their ultimate goal was medical school. Some people I have met are much older than I am and others have struggled to complete their degree given their time of transfer and the fact that their many credits are either unacceptable or nontransferable. The grass is always greener saying comes to mind here.
 
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