Tastebuds

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I am in clinics right now....and someone brought in their little chihuahua. She has mitral regurg. which is very pronounced! When I try and listen to her lungs, all i can hear is the murmur. I am trying to listen for any fluid in the lungs to assess whether she has progressed to CHF. Maybe im not listening in the right places or I just don't know what im listening for? Does anyone have any advice on this subject?

Thanks
 

Bill59

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1. Quiet room
2. Good stethoscope
3. Still or well-restrained patient, preferably standing

Crackles associated with pulmonary edema are best heard during inspiration, especially toward the end of inspiration. The deeper the breath the better, but not panting. Sometimes you can hold off their mouth and nose for a moment to get them to take a deeper breath. Use the diaphragm, not the bell. Try ausculting in the dorsal and peripheral lung field if the heart sounds are overhwelming the breath sounds.

Then ... take a chest x-ray:)
 
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Tastebuds

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1. Quiet room
2. Good stethoscope
3. Still or well-restrained patient, preferably standing

Crackles associated with pulmonary edema are best heard during inspiration, especially toward the end of inspiration. The deeper the breath the better, but not panting. Sometimes you can hold off their mouth and nose for a moment to get them to take a deeper breath. Use the diaphragm, not the bell. Try ausculting in the dorsal and peripheral lung field if the heart sounds are overhwelming the breath sounds.

Then ... take a chest x-ray:)[/QUOTE]


Thanks for the advice! I am trying to get better with my physical exam skills...lol.
 
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Tastebuds

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I forgot to ask...is there a mucolytic that can be used in dogs? This chihuaha has an extensive productive cough, but she can't get the mucous out. I haven't found anything yet....does anyone have any ideas? I feel bad for her! :(

Thanks
 

Nexx

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Hey, not to be a jerk... but are you even a vet student? Aren't you in med (human)?

I can't recall any mucolytics/expectorants that are given to dogs which would probably be inappropriate for a dog with suspected CHF anyhow.

Regardless, consult with a veterinarian.
 

PAThbrd

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SDN is not for seeking medical advice. Stick to the original topic re: auscultation tips or this thread will be closed.