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HCA Kingwood EM residency

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EctopicFetus

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I would advise anyone on here with power to never hire people from these residencies. Thats the only approach. I know it is unpopular but we will have a glut of residents as is. IMO the HCA/Envision label is like a **** smear on your face and CV.
 
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theWUbear

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Ok I'll bite, I went to the RRC website and here are new programs starting just this year . There's 18!?!


Abrazo Health Abrazo Emergency Medicine Residency Program | Abrazo Health Network
Baylor University Medical Center Program, Dallas TX
Capital Health Regional Medical Center Program Trenton NJ
HCA Healthcare LewisGale Medical Center Program
HCA Healthcare/Mercer University School of Medicine/Coliseum Medical Centers Program
HCA Healthcare/Mercer University School of Medicine Program
HCA Houston Healthcare/University of Houston Program
Health Quest Program (this is Borenstein's like 6th program created)
Kaiser Permanente Northern California Program
Magnolia Regional Health Center Program
Memorial Healthcare System, Hollywood, Florida Program
Nazareth Hospital Program
Ochsner Clinic Foundation Program
Riverside Regional Medical Center Program
St Luke’s Hospital – Anderson Campus Program
St. Agnes Medical Center (Fresno) Program
Summa Health System Program
Valley Health System Program
 
D

deleted547339

Ok I'll bite, I went to the RRC website and here are new programs starting just this year (pre-accredidation). There's 18!?!


Abrazo Health Abrazo Emergency Medicine Residency Program | Abrazo Health Network
Baylor University Medical Center Program, Dallas TX
Capital Health Regional Medical Center Program Trenton NJ
HCA Healthcare LewisGale Medical Center Program
HCA Healthcare/Mercer University School of Medicine/Coliseum Medical Centers Program
HCA Healthcare/Mercer University School of Medicine Program
HCA Houston Healthcare/University of Houston Program
Health Quest Program (this is Borenstein's like 6th program created)
Kaiser Permanente Northern California Program
Magnolia Regional Health Center Program
Memorial Healthcare System, Hollywood, Florida Program
Nazareth Hospital Program
Ochsner Clinic Foundation Program
Riverside Regional Medical Center Program
St Luke’s Hospital – Anderson Campus Program
St. Agnes Medical Center (Fresno) Program
Summa Health System Program
Valley Health System Program

Summa’s back? I thought that hospital internally combusted into a black hole/singularity.
 

RustedFox

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Okay guys (and gals), let me play Devil's Advocate here for a second. Just a second, okay?

What if THIS happens:

- Covid-19 panic/hysteria goes away, as people realize that they need to "face the beast and roll the dice" sometime.
- ER daily census-es (censi?) return to normal, and surpass "normal", because primary care is generally a wasteland and more Jenny McJennysons will send more patients to the ER because they can't *medicine, even in the least*.
- Jobs continue to grow (albeit slowly) to reflect this increasing demand. Hell; before COVID-19, my shop was hiring 4 BCEM docs to staff their new freestanding ER a few blocks south of the main campus.
- Boomers continue to boom, and will languish in nursing homes for decades. Cardiac catheterization and stenting is replaced with "direct nanospider therapy", where traditional angiography continues up until the point where the catheter-tip can be directed at the lesion, and nanospiders chew the clot away before inactivating and decomposing. Mortality goes down, but morbidity increases, and all of Florida replaces "salt" and "pepper" shakers with "Lasix" and "Digoxin" shakers at their breakfast counters.
- Nursing home patients begin trading cassette tapes of R.E.O. Speedwagon. (LOOK...before anyone gets pissy; I shot myself in the arm with that joke - I was a tot when REO was big, and my adolescence was marked by the purchase of my first CD (Soundgarden; "Superunknown").
- I quit cracking jokes, and get back to making my point that our ever-growing population is not getting healthier or younger, thus resulting in the need for more ER visits; be they "legitimate" or not, because primary care can't do acute care anymore.

Feel free to shoot BIG holes in my timeline here. This post was MADE to be destroyed, amigos.
 
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hopefulgasman

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They were accredited on 4/16. Instead of waiting for the 2021 application cycle so that they could be at full power, they're going ahead with recruiting a sloppy seconds class outside of the match (very few if any EM-committed USMD's/DO's at this point with an overwhelming majority already securing SOMETHING in the form of TY/prelim surgery year). This is telling of the type of dedication to teaching/training found at this place.

I implore anyone with any common sense to avoid going here. As residents, you will get absolutely crapped on by UT Houston and Baylor and will have a hard time being retained to work in the state. This area does not need any more EM residents. The job market in that area and around the country is TIGHT. With a horrible reputation, no alumni-base to provide job networking, and few resources for a proper education, job outlook and future prospects are extremely poor.
 
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longtimelurker2015

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I mean, there's an argument to be made that HCA is its own microcosm, training residents to practice within their healthcare system. I interviewed at two HCA programs just for kicks this last cycle, before matching at my #1 and a top EM program, and their motto is "Train and retain." I was thoroughly turned off by their training philosophy, but the residents at both programs seemed to drink the Kool-Aid, and they very much were cogs in the wheel and strangely proud to be "masters" at churning out patients and "moving the meat". That's not the type of medicine I want to practice, but if HCA just wants that, and they train physicians in their mold who somehow buy in to that, I guess that works for them? Don't know, just spitballing here...
 
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Zebra Hunter

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I would advise anyone on here with power to never hire people from these residencies. Thats the only approach. I know it is unpopular but we will have a glut of residents as is. IMO the HCA/Envision label is like a **** smear on your face and CV.
Too late for my group. They decided to hire 2 guys from the same HCA program. They are easily the worst 2 docs in our group. Completely uncomfortable with procedures. Overreact when sick patients come in. Can't make decisions for the life of them. They make all the nurses uncomfortable due to how inept they are.

I agree with this quote. If you are responsible for hiring for your group, stay the heck away from HCA trained EM docs.
 
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Too late for my group. They decided to hire 2 guys from the same HCA program. They are easily the worst 2 docs in our group. Completely uncomfortable with procedures. Overreact when sick patients come in. Can't make decisions for the life of them. They make all the nurses uncomfortable due to how inept they are.

I agree with this quote. If you are responsible for hiring for your group, stay the heck away from HCA trained EM docs.

you guys gonna cut ‘em loose?
 

theWUbear

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Too late for my group. They decided to hire 2 guys from the same HCA program. They are easily the worst 2 docs in our group. Completely uncomfortable with procedures. Overreact when sick patients come in. Can't make decisions for the life of them. They make all the nurses uncomfortable due to how inept they are.

I agree with this quote. If you are responsible for hiring for your group, stay the heck away from HCA trained EM docs.

Hi, I'm a senior resident who currently has the opposite of senioritis - acutely aware that in two months I'm going to enjoy another learning curve as I adjust to attending life. This post scares me a bit - though I've taken advantage of every opportunity in residency, more et/chest tubes/lines than peers; feel comfortable with sick patients (and have heard it will be more the balancing number of patients that will be the learning curve) - can you elaborate on what procedures make a poor new attending uncomfortable, and what you mean by overreacting to a sick patient (too broad a workup? or can't handle high acuity patients in some other way?)
 

GatorCHOMPions

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Hi, I'm a senior resident who currently has the opposite of senioritis - acutely aware that in two months I'm going to enjoy another learning curve as I adjust to attending life. This post scares me a bit - though I've taken advantage of every opportunity in residency, more et/chest tubes/lines than peers; feel comfortable with sick patients (and have heard it will be more the balancing number of patients that will be the learning curve) - can you elaborate on what procedures make a poor new attending uncomfortable, and what you mean by overreacting to a sick patient (too broad a workup? or can't handle high acuity patients in some other way?)

This post scares me a bit, too. A graduate of an established program would never question their management skills of sick patients or the lack of experience doing procedures. The exception to this might be orthopedics if you are at a large referral center most of the time in residency, but if you're a good resident you can learn by osmosis helping the ortho residents all the time.

It seems like you went to an (fairly new) HCA residency, am I right? One problem with them is highlighted in your post, the lack of an education standard and general unknowns about what goes on there. It's no secret that HCA prioritizes metrics and appearances (to patients) over a quality physician experience and academics. Are the faculty there really invested in teaching? Do they care enough about the residents to notice if procedure competency is low? Do they notice if you aren't getting enough resuscitations of sick patients? Would they speak up to administration to send you to another site to get those experiences if the existing ones are lackluster? The answer to these questions is "questionable" at best. The Orlando/Tampa/Gainesville area is not NYC, Boston, Chicago, LA, etc. so why do they need more than three established programs (Orlando Health, USF, UF) around there, anyway?

You should've asked yourself these questions prior to ranking this place. I don't mean to be overly harsh, but now is not the time to have these kinds of questions in your training. I'm not saying all new residencies are bad, one which comes to mind over the last few years is Jackson Memorial. They should've had a residency there 30 years ago. On face value you know you're getting a great experience based on the patient population and support of faculty invested in a medical school/university (academic) mentality.
 
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GatorCHOMPions

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The Orlando/Tampa/Gainesville area is not NYC, Boston, Chicago, LA, etc. so why do they need more than three established programs (Orlando Health, USF, UF) around there, anyway?

Just to add on to the quoted post above, the population of the three cities in central FL listed above are 285k + 393k + 134k. Ocala where WUBear is apparently a resident has a population of 60k. If we're being generous and assuming Ocala has a catchment area including the neighboring larger cities, the total population it serves is that of 872k. San Francisco, Charlotte, and Indianapolis are cities this large and yet have 1 or 2 EM residencies each.

Back to OP and this place near Houston, at least they serve a population of 2.3M and this would be their third residency. I don't know anything about the Texas market, but it appears people are saying even they do not need another residency there.
 
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Rekt

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Just to add on to the original post, the population of the three cities in central FL listed above are 285k + 393k + 134k. Ocala where WUBear is apparently a resident has a population of 60k. If we're being generous and assuming Ocala has a catchment area including the neighboring larger cities, the total population it serves is that of 872k. San Francisco, Charlotte, and Indianapolis are cities this large and yet have 1 or 2 EM residencies each.

Back to OP and this place near Houston, at least they serve a population of 2.3M and this would be their third residency. I don't know anything about the Texas market, but it appears people are saying even they do not need another residency there.

That doesn't matter if anything even remotely complex, including trauma, gets shipped by ems somewhere they can handle it.
 
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theWUbear

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This post scares me a bit, too. A graduate of an established program would never question their management skills of sick patients or the lack of experience doing procedures.

....
now is not the time to have these kinds of questions in your training. I'm not saying all new residencies are bad, one which comes to mind over the last few years is Jackson Memorial. They should've had a residency there 30 years ago. On face value you know you're getting a great experience based on the patient population and support of faculty invested in a medical school/university (academic) mentality.

I urge you to be a part of the solution, join us at AAEM, figure out representation on ACGME RRC and where your generation went wrong in allowing the spiraling out of control of EM ACGME, rather than just being an internet keyboard warrior on student doctor network doxxing residents asking about the transition to attending. You're not going to fix overcrowding in the EM specialty by chastizing a resident, my guy

Join us in being a part of the solution, not this guy

1589566821332.png

@Zebra Hunter 's post still interests me - I don't see a general EM procedure that a graduating resident would be 'uncomfortable with' (or are you referring to lack of simulation apparent in those residents with procedures like breech delivery, cric, thoracotomy, neonatal resus, resuscitative hysterotomy, etc?)
 

B52forU

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This post scares me a bit, too. A graduate of an established program would never question their management skills of sick patients or the lack of experience doing procedures. The exception to this might be orthopedics if you are at a large referral center most of the time in residency, but if you're a good resident you can learn by osmosis helping the ortho residents all the time.

It seems like you went to an (fairly new) HCA residency, am I right? One problem with them is highlighted in your post, the lack of an education standard and general unknowns about what goes on there. It's no secret that HCA prioritizes metrics and appearances (to patients) over a quality physician experience and academics. Are the faculty there really invested in teaching? Do they care enough about the residents to notice if procedure competency is low? Do they notice if you aren't getting enough resuscitations of sick patients? Would they speak up to administration to send you to another site to get those experiences if the existing ones are lackluster? The answer to these questions is "questionable" at best. The Orlando/Tampa/Gainesville area is not NYC, Boston, Chicago, LA, etc. so why do they need more than three established programs (Orlando Health, USF, UF) around there, anyway?

You should've asked yourself these questions prior to ranking this place. I don't mean to be overly harsh, but now is not the time to have these kinds of questions in your training. I'm not saying all new residencies are bad, one which comes to mind over the last few years is Jackson Memorial. They should've had a residency there 30 years ago. On face value you know you're getting a great experience based on the patient population and support of faculty invested in a medical school/university (academic) mentality.

Those are strong broad statements of "never question". It's not out of the question to have small doubts as a graduating resident to becoming a new attending especially if they have not had any or sufficient moonlighting experience. I'm a new attending from a 4 year program in Chicago, there have been cases during my first year (about 9 months in) that have made me "uncomfortable". That said, after a full ER residency whether three or four years, it is impossible to see EVERYTHING much less feel comfortable with everything and anything obviously, but you should have a pretty good idea of what something is and more importantly what needs to be done. ETT/lines/chest tubes/LPs/reductions are our bread and butter and we might as well become gas station attendants if you take all of them away.
 
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suckstobeme

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I urge you to be a part of the solution, join us at AAEM, figure out representation on ACGME RRC and where your generation went wrong
Quick question, as you seen more in the know than I am. So how much sway does the RRC have in approving/not approving new programs. For example, if there's a new program in Dubuque that has all the requirements covered can the RRC realistically deny approval on the basis of:
1) there's too many programs already and we don't need more ED docs to create oversupply and lower salaries
OR
2) Dubuque is too small and unlikely to have the pathology/volume needed for training
OR
3) this program is run by HCA/USACS/TH and they have been bad actors in the past (assuming you had evidence that they were bad in the past) even though this new Dubuque program looks fine.

Are those legit reasons to deny approval?
 
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