healthcare and politics in the philippines

Discussion in 'China and Eastern Asia' started by WaZoBia, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. WaZoBia

    WaZoBia Senior Member
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    figured kittycrinkles and freyja are right, a new forum dedicated to the topic of healthcare and politics in the philippines is a good idea. happy posting guys.
     
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  3. chocopinipig

    chocopinipig Member
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    A View on Why Politicians Don't do much about the Health Care status in the country

    i think politicians (who are mostly lawyers) don't really know much about health care. They do know we lack doctors, that most are leaving the country.

    But Apparently they are not doing much right now.

    I've been thinking perhaps they view doctors as their "equal" in the profession. Lawyers are perceived as knowlegeable in Law and in politics,
    Doctors are perceived as experts in health care.
    In fact doctors are the ones in charge of DOH and most head of health care services in the country. In the same way that lawyers are placed in charge of policies in Philippine politics; as well as running the congress and the senate.

    Perhaps they view doctors as experts in running the health care system of the country.

    This could perhaps explain the reason they don't really do much, and that they do not want to meddle in the way doctors run the system.

    Perhaps they see the health care system as an entirely different entity from the ones they are used to (politics) ?

    i know there are other views to consider, specially the Budget allocated to health care ( a lot can be said about the amount given to the DOH). Im just offering another "view" of the matter.
     
  4. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    i'll repost what i previously placed in the wrong thread... :luck:


    have you guys read this article by prof. randy david?

    link

    an excerpt:
    i do hope so. magising na sana ang mga pinoy!

    hmmm... i think this topic deserves a different thread? hehe
     
  5. HOPE4USTMD

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  6. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    I'm thinking that IF there are a lot more women in the medical profession and aspiring to be in this field. This infamous doctor (in this thread, it would seem), is more likely to bag a seat in the senate. If I vote, which I don't, I'd vote for him too since, as it has been stated in the other thread, the Health Department needs to have someone in a higher position. Although, I must also state that having a doctor in that position does not really guarantee that changes will be made in that sector, but having someone gives hope, at least. And I must say, it's a lot better to have doctors in the government rather than a bunch of actors who are just, well, public figures. Figures, being the keyword. On the other hand, if this happens, this will just just make the shortage of the doctors in the philippines even worse. I'm not exactly sure how extensive this shortage is but with the country's current population and a vast number of medical professionals leaving the country, I would surmise that it is not exactly insignificant.
     
  7. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    i saw that show! he looked nervous, but it's excusable because it's his first time. :D

    i don't think it would. they'd be serving the country even more directly.

    hmmm i personally think the health sector isn't well-represented in the government. health isn't exactly a priority for them, when it really ought to be. it is time that we get to have a voice.

    here's a link to an article about the three Kapatiran candidates: by Conrado de Quiros. "All it takes for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing."
     
  8. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    Thinking about it, you may have a point. If the health sector is well-represented in the government, perhaps they can make changes that will entice those in the medical professions to just stay within the country or perhaps even entice those who left. Being one of those who have left the country, I must admit the chances of the latter to happen is slim to none, but never say never. It will be much easier to just convince who are still there to stay put. Hopefully, this will be done.

    On the side note, I am sure that you are aware that there is a shortage of doctors and nurses here in Canada as well. Although there are not a lot of Fil-Cans who are aspiring to be doctors, I have noticed that when I was completing my first program in college, at least 80% of nursing students in the institution I've attended were of Filipino background. And I know that Nursing is probably the most popular program in the Philippines. I just find it really ironic that although Filipinos in healthcare are a dime a dozen, healthcare in the Philippines is far behind.

    OFW's are earning money somewhere else and a part of it is being spent in the Philippines, eventhough this is perhaps helping the economy at the moment, in the long run, this is just making the brain drain in the country even worse. Who will be there to help rebuild the country when the skilled ones have up-and-left? Since they are the ones who have the education and the money to afford moving somewhere else. And those who are left are the uberly rich ones who wouldn't want to leave the country, since they really don't have to, and those who have not been trained to take over the roles that the others have left behind.

    Let's take a look at Japan. They've experienced immense damage after the second world war and yet look at them now, they are one of the richest countries in the world. They started rebuilding from the inside and not became dependent to the outside world. What I'm trying to say is that, improving something does not happen by encouraging others to leave but to convince them to stay. Although, I'm going to leave the question of how to go about this to the likes of the esteemed Dr. Bautista, who, by the way, has set the example of going back. I can't say to make change yet since that remains to be seen.
     
  9. PinoyDoctor

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    I'd just like to say that one of the goals of ASMPH is to produce doctors who could be capable leaders (for the country) as well. :). Can't underestimate a masters degree in management (gives you all the confidence to go beyond the clinic especially while the idealism and hope is still fresh). Actually, i think its almost like MA in Public Health.

    Also, i've been talking to some people who are "a part of the masses", and when i asked them who they plan to vote this coming election, at least one other said that they're definitely NOT voting an actor. They kinda learnt their lesson, and they know better to vote for capable leaders. I do hope that the Filipinos are indeed becoming more mature voters. There's reason to believe this can happen.

    Happy Easter to all! Christ showed us that we can hope! Let us :)... God bless
     
  10. hentaisocrnmdph

    hentaisocrnmdph Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    What is Bautista's platform anyway? Does he have a resume at least?

    Evidence based- what has Flavier and Loi Ejericito Estrada done so far (relative to other senators) for the health sector?
     
  11. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    you can click on the links in my signature for more info about Ang Kapatiran's platform and Dr. Bautista's thoughts.

    i got this from here:
    MARTIN DONATO BAUTISTA, M.D.
    (Senatorial Candidate Under Ang Kapatiran Political Party)

    EDUCATION
    Ateneo de Manila Grade School (1968-1976)
    Ateneo de Manila High School (1976-1980)
    University of the Philippines BS Zoology (1980-1984)
    University of the Philippines College of Medicine (1984-1989)
    State University of New York, Brooklyn Internship (1990-1991)
    SUNY, Brooklyn Residency in Internal Medicine 1991-(1993)
    SUNY, Brooklyn Fellowship in General Internal Medicine (1993-1994)
    SUNY, Brooklyn Fellowship in Gastroenterology 1994-1996

    PROFESSIONAL
    Staff Physician, Regional HealthCare Centers, Guymon, OK (1996-199?)
    Established the Specialty Clinics of St. Anne in Guymon, OK (199?)

    PERSONAL
    Married to Sylvia Tan Bautista, MD a pulmonologist.
    Children: Kathryn (13), Victoria (12), Andrea Patricia (6), Anna Letitia (3)

    Dr. Martin D. Bautista is a 44 year old gastroenterologist who is a total political neophyte. Right after completing medical school at the University of the Philippines in 1989, he and his wife Sylvia went to the US for residency and fellowship training in Brooklyn, NY. They lived in a remote, tiny, peaceful rural town in Oklahoma for 10 years raising their 4 daughters and establishing a successful medical practice before they decided that it was time to go home and determine how best they could give back to their country.

    as for Senator Flavier, i am not well-versed with what specific bills he has lobbied for, but i know he was a very competent DOH secretary. for Senator Loi, i only know of her when she bad mouths the administration. :laugh:
     
  12. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    As far as I can remember:
    Flavier = patak center, condom, iodized salt. well, these were what he promoted when he was the DOH Secretary, as for what he has done when he was elected senator, I have no idea
    Loi Ejercito = absolutely no idea

    I must say that after all this time, it's about time that Filipinos begin to mature as voters and not be attracted by sheer mass popularity which, if I can remember correctly, began back in 1998 with the election of Joseph Estrada. I was only 14 during that time and even when I was that young, I have found the whole thing utterly ridiculous.

    It cannot be helped that some are very cynical about those who are running, no matter how promising they sound and what kind of background they come from. Until I read or hear that they are actually "butting-heads" to see their promises through, I'll remain cynical. It's a good thing to be hopeful but it doesn't hurt to expect for the worst. At least this way, there will be no surprises.
     
  13. hentaisocrnmdph

    hentaisocrnmdph Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    Bweno- medyo mukhang elitista sya... sana naman may magawa sya sa health sector natin if ever man maging senador sya.
     
  14. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    i'm thinking politics is a different arena. but, we won't really know how he can deal with it if he doesn't get elected into the position right? :oops:

    also... is that "elitista" with a positive or negative connotation?
     
  15. tantrum

    tantrum Senior Member
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    Actually, they are more radical in some of their proposals. They are for some selective debt repudiation which should have been done long time ago as it is eating so much of the budget allocation. However the window of opportunity for that has passed as it should have been done after Cory took over. I don't think he (Dr. Bautista) is just looking at just the healthcare sector as there are so many aspects in our politics that needs to change. I've talked to some rural health doctors and you'll be surprised that they are very dependent on the whims of local politicians (like mayors) for their health budgets. This started when part the DOH budget was decentralized under the local government (where corruption takes place).
    I like Martin and I know that he is sincere (you don't leave a lucrative practice in the states if you are not serious-Gastroenterology is one of the highest earning specialty in the US). However, I don't think that the electorate is ready. But SOMEBODY has to try and start a real party based reforms. It might be a springboard for future success.
     
  16. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    It can certainly become a springboard. And just to clarify, I have no aversion on him being seated. As I have stated on my earlier posts, I'd vote for him if I actually vote, which only means that I do want to see what he can and more importantly, what he will do and see through. What I'm saying is, I need to see it before I believe it and until then everything is in question.

    I don't think being labeled as an elitist is positive when it comes to politics. Especially if majority of the population is in poverty. Just my $0.02.

    I miss Philippine politics! :D
     
  17. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    slightly off-topic: how different is US politics from Philippine politics?

    i presumed that in the US, who to elect is mostly done with the party's agenda in mind. in the Philippines kasi, mukhang kung sino ang mas popular (or who's married to a celebrity) usually wins. :smuggrin:

    the kapatiran party is considered an underdog. their campaign is mostly through e-mails, web posts, debate guestings, etc. no catchy jingle to the tune of (annoying) novelty songs, no 15-second commercial to highlight their acting prowess (and flashing braces, hehe). but, i trust in them that they can bring about change. i just hope they get elected.

    okay enough of promotions... :laugh:

    some view their party as "fundamentalist". my question is, what exactly does that mean? (sorry, i don't get it kasi.) :confused:
     
  18. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    I'm not that knowledgeable on US politics as well. I'm from Canada and I must admit I don't really care much about Canadian politics either. It seems to me that everytime they fart, they have an election:laugh: . As for US, all I can say is that they've had an actor turned president, Reagan and of course, they have the GOV Ah-nawld (Arnold Schwarzzeneger). I've also noticed that celebrities do tend to get involved during presidential campaigning as well. They have their own endorsements. Last election, I think it was John Kerry that majority of them was supporting, of course we all know Bush won that one. What I haven't heard of is church endorsements, which is expected every single election in the Philippines. But yeah, they also do the debates, public speeches and so on.

    Unfortunately, I don't know enough about fundamentalism in the states. All I know it that they're right and everyone else is wrong :D.
     
  19. tantrum

    tantrum Senior Member
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    US politics is party based although each party have their shares or liberals and moderates (among democrats) and conservatives and moderates (among republicans). They usually vote (bills in congress) along party lines although a few mavericks and independents go against party lines occasionally. Few actors make it big in politics except for Reagan. An actor (republican) from the tv series Law and Order (former senator Fred Thompson) might run for president this year but his chances are not that great.
    Fundamentalist is a copycat term that might not be applicable in Phil setting. In the Republican party, their core voting base especially in the South (bible belt) and rural areas across the country are social conservatives (anti-abortion, anti-gay, anti-immigrant). Some are also economic conservatives (pro-growth, belief in trickle down economics, less govt regulation of businesses, LESS taxes even for the rich, hates welfare). Their base is dominated by Christian evangelical groups rely on 'fundamental" teachings of the bible. Even the Canadian conservatives (Tories) are more liberal compared to American conservatives.
    Although Kapatiran was started by church-based group, they are far from being fundamentalist. They have some conservative agenda (pro-life stance) but other than that most politicians in the Philippines are economic liberals (preferential treatment of the poor). Many politicians are just corrupt and will say anything to get elected that's why there is so much skepticism about any new group.
     
  20. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    I couldn't agree more. It's a choice between the devil you know and the one that you don't
     
  21. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    it's not really church-based. it is more of a party with members who believe in the same reforms.

    in one of dr. bautista's blog entries, he commented:

    i was thoroughly impressed. he has his own convictions, but he knows that it is unethical to impose these views on patients in the background of the current status of the Philippines. :thumbup:
     
  22. LocutusofBorg

    LocutusofBorg Asklepian Member
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    As an American, soon to begin my Medical studies in the Philippines, I was especially surprised by the hurdles it takes to simply get a student visa to PI. Is the Philippine government REALLY afraid of the millions of starving Americans flocking to PI and bogging down its superior social service system with their first world poverty needs????

    Similarly, I was surprised to learn, that as a foreign national, i would not be able to work as a Physician in the Philippines. That is just silly. Of course, I'd never want to live there long term - I want to take advantage of the economic and cultural benefits of my own country, which I love. But as a "thank you" to the Philippines for educating me in my profession, I could see myself working for two or three years in an area of highest need. The fact that it's not even an option, while there is a shortage of doctors in the country is pretty sad...

    In the United States, for a long time, there has been a shortage of qualified professionals for certain jobs, like nursing. Especially places that don't pay as much, like nursing homes, are notoriously under-staffed. The government created a solution by giving visas to qualified professionals from abroad. I have no deep knowledge of Filipino politics, but I think that rather than only concentrating efforts on bringing Balikbayan doctors home, Phils should open its doors to all qualified foreign physicians/nurses willing to work in their country.
     
  23. LocutusofBorg

    LocutusofBorg Asklepian Member
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    And regarding US politics, I believe it has more to do with campaign finance, than the issues themselves. Securing the endorsement of a political community (such as a large labor union, or a religious group) does little in comparison to a private pledge to protect the interests of a large commercial enterprise/sector. So if, according to one person here, Philippine politics is about celebrities controlled by career politicians, US politics is more about career politicians being controlled by industrial and business leaders.
     
  24. freyja

    freyja Shredder
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    It's not really surprising that you had a hard time getting a student visa. It's like that everywhere. I imagine that I will have to go through the same hurdles if I ever decide to pursue medicine there, which is ridiculous since I'm Fil-Can and was actually born in the Philippines unless I opt for a dual citizenship.

    We all wish that all countries are open to foreign nationals to practice their professions whether they were educated in their country or not but this is not the case. If, let's say, the Philippine government does this, foreigners will take over the positions that the locals should have, as it is, underemployment is rampant. Do not mistake underqualification as the reason for this because it is not, almost everyone has university education. The government is just protecting its own. Even the States wouldn't have opened their doors to foreign-educated nurses if they're still producing them in the country.
     
  25. WaZoBia

    WaZoBia Senior Member
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    this isn't necessarily true. with proper management the philippines can open it's borders to foreign medical doctors. here're a couple of things i think the government can do

    1. allow them take the local boards. foreigners trained in the philippines can pay the same exam fee as the locals while foreigners trained overseas pay extra.
    2. we can make two licenses available- one that permits practice within limits for a period of 6 months (no board exam required- we actually have a law of reciprocity that kindda permits this) and the regular license.
    3. we can make 1-3 year provinicial service a requirement for all foreign physicians.
     
  26. hentaisocrnmdph

    hentaisocrnmdph Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    A NEUTRAL CONNOTATION THAT ONE... JUST WISHING NA IF HE GETS ELECTED, SANA MASOLUSYONAN NYA YUNG MGA PINAGLALABAN NYA- UNLIKE HIS "WILL BE" PREDECESSORS (FLAVIER AND MOST ESPECIALLY EJERCITO- ESTRADA) IF EVER HE WILL BE ELECTED.
     
  27. md817

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    Hi! Am new here! Also a doc. My aunt married into the family of one of the 3 candidates of Ang Kapatiran (Atty. Jess Paredes, the one with the long hair na former DFA Usec. ) so am definitely voting for all 3 of them. Here's his blog http://zparedes.wordpress.com/.

    Yes, you're right kittycrinkles, they really don't have the resources and machinery that the 2 big parties have. Puro donations and free advertising lang parang ganito. The fact that they lasted this long is victory enough. I've been apolitical and voting by hula-hula method for so many years so it's nice that this time I actually have "good people" to vote for. They are good, competent, qualified men with sincere intentions. They have no "scandal" marring their reputations nor do they have affiliations with the powers that be. They are indeed a fresh alternative to same old traditional politicians and celebrities (or w/ celebrity spouses)! hehe!

    Conrado de Quiros wrote an enlightening article about why people should vote for underdogs even if they probably won't win -- http://opinion.inquirer.net/inquireropinion/columns/view_article.php?article_id=60987
     
  28. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    ^ i totally agree with Conrado de Quiros' view. :thumbup:
     
  29. hentaisocrnmdph

    hentaisocrnmdph Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    Amidst the review and the information overload....

    Kawawa naman si Martin Bautista, hindi na sya na alis sa 20+ sa senatorials. Talagang nadehado sya ng husto sa line up ng mga senatoriables

    Masaya na akong nakapasok si Angara at Zubiri rather than Honasan, Roco, Montano and Gomez. Mukhang gusto na nilang magpakamatay kanina nung ininterview sila sa GMA
     
  30. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    it's sad, but Kapatiran wasn't called an underdog for nothing. they absolutely did not have as much money for campaigning like the other parties.

    Dr. Bautista said that many people kept asking him why he was fighting for a lost cause. they knew it could be a lost cause, but their vision of a better Senate probably fueled them on.

    i wish i was a risk-taker.
     
  31. tantrum

    tantrum Senior Member
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    Kapatiran has very little exposure or "awareness" among voters. They can do better next time.

    It's too early to tell but Honasan might make it to the top 12. Even Trillanes is hanging on but will most likely drop by next week (when the provincial tallies come).
     
  32. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    i know this question is a bit early, but we can probably deduce from the partial results who would be part of top 12. so, what do you think would these new or reelected senators bring to the country? especially regarding healthcare.

    which now makes me wonder... was healthcare ever made an issue during senatorial debates?
     
  33. hentaisocrnmdph

    hentaisocrnmdph Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    top 13- Incumbent senator Lim won the LGU Mayor position. That means he would have to give up his position in the senate and serve as the Mayor in Manila. The 13th senator (lucky) would have to serve for 3 years rather than 6 so as to replace Lim's position. So far, parang wala sa kanila ang may gagawin for the healthcare, mas magiging problem ang peace, military, ousting of GMA, poverty, housing, peso appreciation/ devaluation kaysa sa healthcare
     
  34. tantrum

    tantrum Senior Member
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    Nothing will change as healthcare issues are not "vote-getters". They will just maintain the status quo rather than promoting socialized medicine which will benefit most people. People are just used to the current system (survival of the fittest) they think it's normal.
     
  35. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    "learned helplessness"... that is what the Filipino mindset is in now.

    sad, but seems true...

    here's another look at our country's sad story:
    '80% of sick Pinoys die without access to drugs'

    An excerpt:

    The article then talks about Botika ng Bayan and how to establish a pharmacy & help your fellow Pinoys at the same time.

    But the point is... many Pinoys are indeed misinformed. Not only about generic meds but also about breastfeeding.

    It's time that the gov't does something to help the poor from this vicious situation.
     
  36. chocopinipig

    chocopinipig Member
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    im not really a fan of generic drugs. A lot could be said about their quality. Yes they do pass through quality control but i still have doubts on the bioavailability of generic medications. Anyway, i guess they're better than nothing.
     
  37. kittycrinkles

    kittycrinkles picking out zebras
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    i also had a classmate who used a generic med for his tooth infection. it became worse and he had to have it removed! :(

    i've also noticed that lots of "supplements" (made from vegetables & fruits, etc) are gaining more airtime on television. many of these ads are saying, "My hypertension got better with diet, medications and *insert product name*!!!" (translated & paraphrased from the ad).

    i don't think this is healthy. it's just another way to misinform the people and make profit out of them.
     

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