Mar 31, 2010
4
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Non-Student
I guess I'm starting things a little early (Im an IB junior in highschool), but I would like to know about the steps on how to get into the pre-vet program and so-on.

Do I just imediately start into Pre-Vet? Or do I complete the first mandatory 2 years? What is a GRE??

and in the IB program I end up getting around 20 - 36 (rough estimate) college credits when I graduate. So when I complete the rest of the credits required for the mandatory 2 years then do I immediately go into pre-vet? And while I'm not in the pre-Vet program am I allowed to take fun electives like ceramics?

Also (last one I promise) is there a type of test to take to even be eligible for the pre-vet program?

Thank you for all your help!
 

Poochlover11

10+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2009
396
0
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Hi and welcome!

There isn't really a pre-vet program. Basically each vet school has a list of classes they require you take in order to be accepted for vet school. So you can pick any major you would like as long as you finish those classes. It's usually easier to get those classes done with a major like biology or animal science, because they have over-lapping requirements.

So, basically after high school what usually happens is you get your bachelors in whatever degree you like (animal science, chem, or even dance-whatever you'd like). Then typically people will apply to vet school in the fall of their junior or senior year. The GRE is an exam you take (kind of like taking the ACT to get into college) usually the summer before you apply in the fall. It's one of the requirements for getting into vet school.

Good luck and if you have anymore questions feel free to ask!
 

cowgirla

Oklahoma 2014
7+ Year Member
Oct 6, 2009
3,623
1,982
181
mid-atlantic
Status
Veterinarian
I guess I'm starting things a little early (Im an IB junior in highschool), but I would like to know about the steps on how to get into the pre-vet program and so-on.

Do I just imediately start into Pre-Vet? Or do I complete the first mandatory 2 years? What is a GRE??

and in the IB program I end up getting around 20 - 36 (rough estimate) college credits when I graduate. So when I complete the rest of the credits required for the mandatory 2 years then do I immediately go into pre-vet? And while I'm not in the pre-Vet program am I allowed to take fun electives like ceramics?

Also (last one I promise) is there a type of test to take to even be eligible for the pre-vet program?

Thank you for all your help!

Ok, for starters:
there's really no such thing as a "pre vet program." If you want to MAJOR in ceramics, go for it. Vet schools wont care as long as you get their requirements done (bio, chem, organic, biochem, micro, etc). It really doesnt matter where you go to school. Enjoy yourself, do well, get the requirements done, and you'll be fine. Go ahead and take a ceramic class or two-- it's fun!

GRE is like the SAT for grownups. Required for graduate school admissions at most schools, not just vet schools.

As for a test to be eligble for a "pre vet program" like I said, there is no such program. You'll probably have to take the SAT or ACT to get into a college though.
 

Nephromaniac

UTK c/o 2013
10+ Year Member
Mar 31, 2009
79
0
0
Kent, Ohio
Status
Veterinary Student
Just to clarify a bit, some colleges do have a "Pre-vet" secondary major type of thing, that pretty much includes a lot of the basic class requirements of many vet schools (for example, my major at my undergrad was zoology / pre-vet)

That said, it is pretty much irrelevant in the long haul. You by no means have to be a "pre-vet". As others said, you can major in whatever you want as long you include the pre-reqs, which vary by school (of course, science based majors like zoology / animal science / etc. will contain more of the required classes, & generally be a little easier to fit all the classes in in the shortest time). Plus, my "pre-vet" curriculum didn't include some courses required by many vet schools, so I still had to be aware of those exceptions & make sure I fit them in separately.

The best thing to do is check out some vet school websites to get an idea of the general classes required by each one. Most schools requirements are similar, although vary in some aspects. I know it's early, but if you have ideas on which vet schools you may be interested in, focusing on their requirements could be helpful to give you a general idea. And many schools have science or pre-vet advisers who may be able to help (again, just be careful, & take anything they say with a grain of salt & double check it yourself - I learned that the hard way!)

Overall though, I think you're gonna be on a great path! You're already a step of the game & obviously motivated enough to start gathering info, so kudos to you! Good luck!

Edit: And yes! Definitely include some of those fun classes like ceramics that you enjoy, it'll keep you sane!
 
Last edited:

Poochlover11

10+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2009
396
0
0
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Just to clarify a bit, some colleges do have a "Pre-vet" secondary major type of thing, that pretty much includes a lot of the basic class requirements of many vet schools (for example, my major at my undergrad was zoology / pre-vet)
Ya, we have that too. For example, I am animal science with a pre-vet option. All that means really is that on my degree audit the pre-vet option encompasses the class requirements I need for vet school that won't be fulfilled by my animal science major. But it's not a program you get accepted into.
 

cowgirla

Oklahoma 2014
7+ Year Member
Oct 6, 2009
3,623
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Veterinarian
Ya, we have that too. For example, I am animal science with a pre-vet option. All that means really is that on my degree audit the pre-vet option encompasses the class requirements I need for vet school that won't be fulfilled by my animal science major. But it's not a program you get accepted into.

I was an Animal Science major, prevet concentration too.

And no, it didn't meet the requirements of all vet schools. I had to go back after I finished to take public speaking, taking animal nutrition now, and there were a couple other schools with funky requirements that I didnt have.

So its definitely not a garauntee
 

Poochlover11

10+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2009
396
0
0
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Pre-Veterinary
I was an Animal Science major, prevet concentration too.

And no, it didn't meet the requirements of all vet schools. I had to go back after I finished to take public speaking, taking animal nutrition now, and there were a couple other schools with funky requirements that I didnt have.

So its definitely not a garauntee
Agreed. The pre-vet option only encompasses the class requirements at ISU. And ISU only requires one physics class and two chem labs. So, at this point I can't really apply anywhere else because most schools require two physics and at least three chem labs.
 

BomberCanoe

UTK c/o 2014
Mar 8, 2010
68
0
0
Raleigh
Status
Veterinary Student
To re-iterate: major in whatever you want. No one is quite sure whether vet schools prefer a related major (zoology, biology, animal sci, etc) to show you are focused, vs a different major (soft sciences, lib art, etc) to show that you're a diverse applicant. Will a relevant major make it easier to take care of pre-reqs? definitely! will an unrelated major give you something to talk about during an interview? most likely! Personally, I would say major in a related science, and minor in something fun (history, art, etc). and look into related minors too- I picked up a genetics minor by only taking 1 extra course, and by taking specific courses for my 'science electives'.

As far as pre-vet majors, my school has a 'pre vet' track, which is essentially parts of my zoology major, with a few added in classes (business, personal finance, as NCSU had recently added those courses to pre reqs for the vet school). As far as my school is concerned, zoology seems like the best choice, as biology has 2-3 plant courses (which aren't my thing, and I'd find a waste of time when I'm trying to get pre-reqs, and animal related courses). Animal science is geared more towards equine and large animal vet, as well as actually owning livestock and such. You can steer either (bio or animal science) towards what you want, I just found that zoology let me complete as many pre-reqs as possible while satisfying my degree, letting me take courses I found interesting. Just be sure to research requirements, because no one degree is going to steer you straight into vet school (as far as pre-reqs are concerned)

And everyone has already mentioned the SAT and GRE. Be aware of what schools you are planning on applying to. I know at least one (Oklahoma, I believe), require the GRE-bio, and I think I've heard that Georgia requires the MCAT? Not sure about that.

And I know this wasn't a question you asked, but: EXPERIENCE! I (for some stupid reason), waited until my sophomore year to get a job and start getting vet experience. Start early! They want breadth and depth (a wide variety, with a focus in one area). With many schools, your GPA and GRE get you past the first cut, but the experience really counts for the second.

Hopefully this has helped, I know several people have probably all responded and said the same thing by the time I typed this. Good luck applying to colleges, and go ahead and get started with the experience!
 

marycatherine

working on the pre-reqs
Nov 14, 2009
268
2
0
Virginia
Status
Pre-Veterinary
And everyone has already mentioned the SAT and GRE. Be aware of what schools you are planning on applying to. I know at least one (Oklahoma, I believe), require the GRE-bio, and I think I've heard that Georgia requires the MCAT? Not sure about that.
Georgia does the Biology GRE, too. I don't believe they require the MCAT-- I've heard of some schools accepting MCAT scores as in "sure, we'll look at them", but haven't heard of a school requiring the MCAT.
 

Minnerbelle

Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2009
5,112
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Veterinary Student
I know a lot of people here are saying that you should be careful because some places require the Bio GRE or extra courses like nutrition and public speaking, but I personally wouldn't worry about that just yet (unless you're convinced you MUST apply to EVERY vet school out there, in which case, let's add on physiology, genetics, microbiology, etc...). There are plenty of schools you can apply to without those... and once you're closer to applying and you're more aware of which schools you do want to apply to, you can figure out the rest of the pre-req you want to take then. Just make sure that you start knocking out those universal pre-reqs like physics, gen chem, organic chem, intro bio, etc... and you'll be on the right track!

P.S. I didn't take nutrition, public speaking, or bio GRE's, and I was still able to apply to 7 schools.
 
Nov 14, 2009
33
0
0
Southern California
Status
Pre-Veterinary
Fellow IB-er! Enjoy your first SL tests ;)

Basically what everone else has said, pre-vet's just kind of an option that can go along with certain majors that cover most pre-reqs. I'm a future Animal Science with pre-vet track, too, like a couple other people here. Really, it doesn't matter what shows up as what you studied. What matters is what you DO study, so just cover those prerequisite classes for the vet schools you want to apply to :)
It is easier, though, to major in a science, 'cause then you have lot of classes that overlap with the pre-reqs. I think if you end up majoring in something totally different it almost ends up like a double major.

I think a good strategy would be to start looking at which schools you REALLY want to go to, and then start trying to fill those pre-reqs.

As for the GRE, I dont' know much about it here either, I'm learning a bunch about it now on this topic itself :p
 
Mar 31, 2010
4
0
0
Status
Non-Student
Hey Guys! - Thanks for all your help. I think I'll take your advice and take a science major and then a fun minor (like art). Once again - Thank you for all your help. I'm much happier with a new focus and can start early. Sadly chemistry isn't my strong point, but I can do it with a little studying! Thanks again!
 
Jan 31, 2010
872
0
0
Minnesota
Status
Veterinary Student
Hey Guys! - Thanks for all your help. I think I'll take your advice and take a science major and then a fun minor (like art). Once again - Thank you for all your help. I'm much happier with a new focus and can start early. Sadly chemistry isn't my strong point, but I can do it with a little studying! Thanks again!
Don't worry, it wasn't mine either. If you muscle through it as a bio major for two years, it magically turns into biochem and everything is sparkles and unicorns again.
 

racccjlm

Iowa 2014 grad; Ophtho resident
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 4, 2009
444
27
261
Status
Veterinarian
Sadly chemistry isn't my strong point, but I can do it with a little studying! Thanks again!
Hi! Chemistry is DEFINITLEY not my strong point either. The thing that helped me was finding a study group in college...I've found that peers/friends can often explain things in a more understandable way because they know where you're coming from :)

Here's a list of most of the vet schools for the US/UK. Just click on the schools and you will be taken to their specific requirements. I know that occasionally some schools have modified their requirements a bit, so a few of these may be old --- but you'll get a better understanding of what requirements we're talking about, etc. Good luck! I'm impressed that you're getting such an early start!

http://www.aavmc.org/vmcas/college_requirement.htm