iluvmedicine2

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Hello,

I am interested in pursuing a career as a nurse practitioner. From the limited research I have done, it appears that I need a minimum of a MSN to become a nurse practitioner. However, I am not a RN.

Instead, I have a B.S. in Biology and a Master of Public Health degree with certificates in Epidemiology and Health Education & Promotion and a significant amount of clinical volunteer experience. I have also completed one year of medical school, but am being advised to consider another health profession. I am definitely still passionate about health care which is driving my interest to become a RN, PA, or NP; yet, when I consider the autonomy of each, I think I may prefer being a NP.

So, I would greatly appreciate it if someone could put me on the right track of how someone like me (with potentially transferable graduate and professional level courses under my belt) can become a NP and/or which educational programs I should consider. Thanks in advance!
 
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iluvmedicine2

iluvmedicine2

Psalm 103
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Hello, @IknowImnotadoctor and @pamac !

I read on another thread that you two are nurse practitioners. Is there any chance either of you could help me with my question above?
 

pamac

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If they are only advising you to consider another career, and not telling you to, then tell them to pound sand, and stay in medical school. In 3 more years you would be going into residency, and then 3 years after that you’ll be a physician. The alternative is that in three years after nursing school and Np school, you’ll be a brand new NP making a fraction of what you would as a physician. Screw that! You already have some of the most jarring parts of the medical school process behind you.

There are plenty of threads from the past detailing how to become an Np. I’d suggest you look those up first. But mostly I’d suggest getting things out together so you can continue medical school.
 
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iluvmedicine2

iluvmedicine2

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If they are only advising you to consider another career, and not telling you to, then tell them to pound sand, and stay in medical school. In 3 more years you would be going into residency, and then 3 years after that you’ll be a physician. The alternative is that in three years after nursing school and Np school, you’ll be a brand new NP making a fraction of what you would as a physician. Screw that! You already have some of the most jarring parts of the medical school process behind you.

There are plenty of threads from the past detailing how to become an Np. I’d suggest you look those up first. But mostly I’d suggest getting things out together so you can continue medical school.
Hello @pamac,
Thank you for your reply! Well, I suppose it is more accurate to say that they told me to in that I did not pass two courses and they are not allowing me to remediate them nor continue in their medical program. They have been revising their policies every year and are concerned about their reputation above all. Their very words to me were that they "strongly believed I would be an asset to the health care field and should continue pursuing it." (Just not with their institution apparently). Attempting to apply to another medical school program has crossed my mind, but I forsee that being a greater uphill battle than becoming an NP. Call me crazy, but I have never been in this for the money. Even as a physician, I wanted to go into primary care. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but the median salary for NPs is not too far off from the median salaries of primary care physicians is it? And to your knowledge, will my med school dismissal ruin my chances of acceptance to a nursing program?
 

pamac

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Oh. Well then by all means, go to an accelerated nursing program and then an NP program. You’ll probably do just fine.

I don’t know any doctors that don’t make at least twice what the typical Np in that particular field makes. In the case of specialties, it can be higher than 10 times what the NPs make, or more. In primary care, I’ve read in articles that physicians can make as low as $160,000, but I think that even “if” you find a physician making that low of a wage, then you should expect that any FNP working with that doctor would be pulling around $90k. I would imagine where I’m at that a typical family practice doctor makes at least $240k without trying too hard, but FNPs in their offices shouldn’t expect more than $130 under the best case scenarios. I’d be really surprised if a new grad made that much. They start around $90k to $105k if the practice is interested in recruiting the better new NP providers.

I think you’d probably handle RN and NP school just fine.
 

IknowImnotadoctor

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Hello,

I am interested in pursuing a career as a nurse practitioner. From the limited research I have done, it appears that I need a minimum of a MSN to become a nurse practitioner. However, I am not a RN.

Instead, I have a B.S. in Biology and a Master of Public Health degree with certificates in Epidemiology and Health Education & Promotion and a significant amount of clinical volunteer experience. I have also completed one year of medical school, but am being advised to consider another health profession. I am definitely still passionate about health care which is driving my interest to become a RN, PA, or NP; yet, when I consider the autonomy of each, I think I may prefer being a NP.

So, I would greatly appreciate it if someone could put me on the right track of how someone like me (with potentially transferable graduate and professional level courses under my belt) can become a NP and/or which educational programs I should consider. Thanks in advance!
Hello, @IknowImnotadoctor and @pamac !

I read on another thread that you two are nurse practitioners. Is there any chance either of you could help me with my question above?
I recommend you look into direct entry masters programs at schools that have an NP program. The masters program will fulfill some of your graduate school course requirements while pursuing an RN; essentially allowing you to double dip. Once you get your masters and your RN, you get a job as an RN to both get paid, get experience, and let your hospital system pay for some classes. At the end once you’re an NP with 2 years of RN experience. You’ll be in good shape. Good luck to you.
 
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iluvmedicine2

iluvmedicine2

Psalm 103
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Oh. Well then by all means, go to an accelerated nursing program and then an NP program. You’ll probably do just fine.

I don’t know any doctors that don’t make at least twice what the typical Np in that particular field makes. In the case of specialties, it can be higher than 10 times what the NPs make, or more. In primary care, I’ve read in articles that physicians can make as low as $160,000, but I think that even “if” you find a physician making that low of a wage, then you should expect that any FNP working with that doctor would be pulling around $90k. I would imagine where I’m at that a typical family practice doctor makes at least $240k without trying too hard, but FNPs in their offices shouldn’t expect more than $130 under the best case scenarios. I’d be really surprised if a new grad made that much. They start around $90k to $105k if the practice is interested in recruiting the better new NP providers.

I think you’d probably handle RN and NP school just fine.
Thank you so much. I really appreciate the insight.
 
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iluvmedicine2

iluvmedicine2

Psalm 103
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I recommend you look into direct entry masters programs at schools that have an NP program. The masters program will fulfill some of your graduate school course requirements while pursuing an RN; essentially allowing you to double dip. Once you get your masters and your RN, you get a job as an RN to both get paid, get experience, and let your hospital system pay for some classes. At the end once you’re an NP with 2 years of RN experience. You’ll be in good shape. Good luck to you.
Thank you for your response. Yes, after much research and speaking with a couple of my friends in the nursing field, I have decided to apply to the direct entry master's of nursing programs in my home state. They sound promising and mention preparing students for the NCLEX as well as the CNL (Clinical Nurse Leader) exam. Is the CNL exam what I would have to take (in addition to the NCLEX) to become an NP?
 

IknowImnotadoctor

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Thank you for your response. Yes, after much research and speaking with a couple of my friends in the nursing field, I have decided to apply to the direct entry master's of nursing programs in my home state. They sound promising and mention preparing students for the NCLEX as well as the CNL (Clinical Nurse Leader) exam. Is the CNL exam what I would have to take (in addition to the NCLEX) to become an NP?
In my opinion the CNL is a useless degree, it’s just what the colleges sell to get graduate level course money; however, it’s still the right road for you. The CNL essentially teaches you how to be a charge nurse, however, charge nurse is a role that is earned at the bedside, not studied for at the masters level. If 5 years from now you and another RN with equal experience and qualifications were both applying for a single charge nurse position then your CNL might play a role. As a future NP it will be something to put on your resume that no one will likely notice. However, with your future plans, it’s the route you have to take.

The CNL is completely a different thing from NP school. Once you get your direct entry masters you will need to go back to get your NP. How long that will take depends on if your school has implemented the DNP for NP yet or not. So it will depend. If you would like to PM me which school you plan to attend I can give you more info on what road is ahead for you.
 
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iluvmedicine2

iluvmedicine2

Psalm 103
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Mar 12, 2012
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In my opinion the CNL is a useless degree, it’s just what the colleges sell to get graduate level course money; however, it’s still the right road for you. The CNL essentially teaches you how to be a charge nurse, however, charge nurse is a role that is earned at the bedside, not studied for at the masters level. If 5 years from now you and another RN with equal experience and qualifications were both applying for a single charge nurse position then your CNL might play a role. As a future NP it will be something to put on your resume that no one will likely notice. However, with your future plans, it’s the route you have to take.

The CNL is completely a different thing from NP school. Once you get your direct entry masters you will need to go back to get your NP. How long that will take depends on if your school has implemented the DNP for NP yet or not. So it will depend. If you would like to PM me which school you plan to attend I can give you more info on what road is ahead for you.
Oh, I see. That makes a lot of sense. Thanks so much! Will PM you now.
 
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Hi! New to SDN and in a similar situation. I have a degree in biology but now am considering going back for a BSN. I don't know where you are located but some schools have accelerated BSN programs (14-16months I believe). Once completed you get a BSN and then you take the NCLEX-RN. These are the program I'm looking into currently so I don't know everything. Good luck! If you need any help feel free to pm me!
 

pamac

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You can be a PA in less time.
In theory. But there is a year of waiting and interviewing before you get into PA school. If you don’t, then there’s going to be another year of waiting. So if he or she applied right now, they wouldn’t be seated until next fall. One could already be an RN at that point, and then go on to become an NP two years after that. That would have them entering the job market at the same time.
 

Boatswain2PA

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So, I would greatly appreciate it if someone could put me on the right track of how someone like me (with potentially transferable graduate and professional level courses under my belt) can become a NP
First, become a nurse.
2nd, have a pulse, and a checkbook.
3rd, if no checkbook, have credit for student loans.

That's about all it takes for many NP programs to accept you. And once you're accepted you have an extremely high likelihood of completing the program and becoming an NP.

Stay in medical school, get the best medical education you can, become a physician, match into a residency that appeals to you, pay off your student loans in 3 years, and then reap the rewards of your delayed gratification.
 

pamac

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AA school is a dead end. They only can practice in a handful of states. Too much limitation for too much money.

The only reason PA programs are picky right now is that all the folks with business degrees, and geography degrees, and English degrees, and then can take a handful of prerequisites and get into school. All the folks who didn’t get into dental school, physical therapy school, or medical school have most of the prerequisite ready to go. PA schools then have to hit things hard for one year of in class work, and one year of clinical training to make up for the fact that most PA applicants have never touched a patient, run a code, or made a difficult healthcare decision for someone else. Now that everyone seems to be opening up a PA school to Pad the bottom line, you’ll begin to see them scale back to mere pulses as qualifications. They’ve thrown decent healthcare experience aside as a critical requirement. I remember a few years back when the economy was bad, everyone applied to PA school. I had a friend who sold insurance, and he was all excited to have gotten into PA school. Not a bit of healthcare experience.