GiJoe

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ok so the who gives us our path lecture starts out by saying that " i'm expecting you know the coagulation cascade and etc, so im going to fly through this..."
the thing is we never learned it in any class so im kinda stuck learning it myself....which isnt so bad but im kinda confused... I've memorized most of the cascade and its important parts but what the hell is it and how does it have to do with platelets? is it end product fibrin that binds the platelets together? where does ADP Thromboxane and the glycoprotiens come in?

I know these questions might sound simple but take this opportunity to review for yourself and at the same time, help someone out.

Thanks
 

Stinger86

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Originally posted by GiJoe
ok so the who gives us our path lecture starts out by saying that " i'm expecting you know the coagulation cascade and etc, so im going to fly through this..."
the thing is we never learned it in any class so im kinda stuck learning it myself....which isnt so bad but im kinda confused... I've memorized most of the cascade and its important parts but what the hell is it and how does it have to do with platelets? is it end product fibrin that binds the platelets together? where does ADP Thromboxane and the glycoprotiens come in?

I know these questions might sound simple but take this opportunity to review for yourself and at the same time, help someone out.

Thanks

Here's another link that might help you:

Another link that might help you

The primary hemostatic plug is mediated by platelet adhesion (via vWf to subendothelial collagen) and platelet aggregation (which is initiated by the release of ADP and Thromboxane A2 from the platelets upon adhesion). So after vessel damage occurs, platelets bind vWf with their GpIb receptor and begin to release ADP and TXA2, among other things. Both these substances are prothrombotic, and this causes other platelets to bind to the already bound platelets (the ones bound to vWf) via the GpIIb/IIIa receptor. Fibrinogen is the ligand used to connect one GpIIb/IIIa receptor to another. Once the primary (platelet) plug is formed, the coagulation pathway is wrapping up and all the factors are produced sequentially which eventually leads to the production of thrombin which cleaves fibrinogen into fibrin. Since you already have this primary clot consisting of fibrinogen and platelets, as the fibrinogen is converted into sticky fibrin, the plug becomes reinforced and solidified, and becomes the secondary plug. So secondary hemostasis involves the coagulation factors, and primary hemostasis does not..

The glycoproteins are found on the platelets. GpIb mediates binding to vWf (a process called adhesion), and GpIIb/IIIa mediates binding between platelets using fibrinogen as a ligand (called aggregation). An absence of GpIb or GpIIb/IIIa gives rise to Bernard-Soulier disease and Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, respectively.

Hope this helps.
 
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