help w/ ranking, plz...

Discussion in 'PM&R' started by whorubigman, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. whorubigman

    whorubigman Member
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  2. njdevil

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    Baylor has a huge gap after that it is a mish mosh to me.

    On the east coast, i would say that cornell-columbia would be first with temple 2nd (have you looked at Jeff?) and hopkins a distant third (have you looked at Sinai?).
     
  3. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!!
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    I big part of the equation is your particular interest? Do you want a program strong in MSK? SCI? Inpatient? Outpatient?


    With regards to reputation, Baylor is certainly atop your list (very inpatient oriented, but the name is helpful during fellowship interviews). In my opinion the NYC programs are average or over-rated.

    I think the Ohio programs are probably mid-level with good exposure to a spectrum of PM&R.

    Hopkins is new, has a MSK fellowship, but requires a lot of travel.

    Pitt seems to be improving all the time with consistently good reviews on this website.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  4. whorubigman

    whorubigman Member
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  5. whorubigman

    whorubigman Member
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  6. cyanocobalamin

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    Hopkins does require a lot of travel. For example, you do a block of TBI at NRH in Washington because they don't have a lock down unit. You also go out to suburban hospitals and clinics a lot though their names elude me at this point. I believe most inpt is in the R1 year.
     
  7. melancholy

    melancholy 1K Member
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    PGY-2's do their in-house call, ortho, and SCI at Good Samaritan Hospital which can be about a 20 minute drive without traffic if I remember correctly. Baltimore is not a huge town with a lot of traffic relative to many other cities.

    In addition to spending a decent amount of time at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Kennedy Krieger Institute which are all on the same campus, they travel to the Bayview campus which is about 10-15 minutes away and a number of outpatient clinics which are on the outskirts of Baltimore, but as I said before, Baltimore isn't a hugely gridlocked city in the first place.

    All in all, you definitely do need a car in Baltimore, but parking is not a huge concern from what I remember and aside from the NRH rotation in the PGY-4 year (which is not a bad experience in itself), I didn't consider the amount of driving they did to be excessive. (Then again, I am used to doing a lot of driving in southern California for rotations!)
     
  8. joseppi

    joseppi Member
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    I agree with mel about the JHU driving- to me it didn't seem far at all. Nothing like driving the 10 at any time of day in LA!!!
    I guess its all personal perspective and how you see it compared to your life experiences. In retrospect I think there are very few programs that have no driving, that are located all on the same campus. (atleast from the ones I visited I can only think of one) Take Kessler for example, their driving is alot more extensive than JHU and much traffic from what I understand.

    Of your programs listed, I would probably place the so.cal programs lower on my list unless you are locationally linked to area. (I have rotated at them), however so of your programs in the midwest I have never visited on rotated so I can't offer any opinion. I guess it all comes down to your priorities, what you want. You should make a list to hellp you sort it out. It'll make your decision much more clearer.
    hope that helps
     
  9. whorubigman

    whorubigman Member
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    You're right. What's most important are my priorities. What are yours? Just out of curiosity... Thank you for your helpful words...
     
  10. njdevil

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    I just mean that Baylor's national reputation is much bigger than any of the other programs you listed. Good luck in your search.
     
  11. axm397

    axm397 SDN Moderator
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    Be careful not to call PM&R PMNR on your interviews... It's Physical Medicine AND Rehabilitation.

    People have been called on that in the past.

    Good luck on all your interviews. Sounds like you are getting some quality ones.... :luck:
     
  12. drusso

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    Yes...beware of the Ampersand...Nothing really blows it for a candidate than asking, "So, what does the 'N' stand for?"
     
  13. melancholy

    melancholy 1K Member
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    Out of curiousity, when I first began my journey looking into physiatry a year or two ago, I noticed the voice clip for the pronounciation of "physiatrist" was a lot different from how most people, perhaps, incorrectly, say it.

    I thought it was interesting when I went on my interviews that once in awhile, I would find an attending who did make that distinction... and even an occasional patient too!
     
  14. axm397

    axm397 SDN Moderator
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    Some of the hard-core old timers will know that the correct pronunciation is phys-ee-a-trist. Most ppl don't care. The only thing is there's a possibility you will be interviewed by one of those hard core ppl in which case it may become a big deal.
     
  15. rehabmd

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    What drives me nuts by these old timers is how they have hampered our credibility as a medical specialty. Over the years I have come to realize that most physicians in other specialties and patients doubt that I am really a physician when I refer to myself as a physiatrist-it sounds too much like physiotherapist, which residency did not, but should have prepared me for; when I refer to myself as an expert in rehabilitation medicine, I am considered no different from the therapists(PT/OT/ST) who title thier progress notes from dept of rehabilitation medicine, so there I lose credibility for my own physician skills as well. I have found that I get the most credibility and respect from collegues and patients who meet me initally when I describe myself as a expert in neuromuscular disease or a non-surgical orthopedic specialist, which is my reason for choosing this specialty. I wish the old timers in our specialty had more foresight in naming our specialty so we would have greater credibility as a medical specialty by now.
     
  16. violet1024

    violet1024 Junior Member
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    This discussion reminds me of a some editorials I read by Dr. Johnson from the American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. And it reminds of the time when the psychiatry service consulted PMNR :)

    Volume 75(2), March/April 1996, p 83


    Volume 80(3), March 2001, p 161

    I've never read Dr. Krusen's writings on the subject of our specialty's name. Has anyone else?

    Our chairman emeritus gave us a talk about the history of PM&R, and he said the first physical medicine docs were radiologists!

    from the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (they publish the Archives w/ the AAPM&R) website

    (I'm a bit of a history buff, can you tell?)
     
  17. Finally M3

    Finally M3 Senior Member
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    If you've met Dr. Johnson (and you will if you interview at OSU), you'll get the real-time version of his editorial. :laugh:
     
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  18. paz5559

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    I have had the pleasure of both reading Dr. Johnson’s works as well as hearing him speak regarding this subject, and he is indeed, enlightening.

    The problem, of course, is his dogmatic and rigid stance on the subject (although I tend to think his hyperbole is purposeful).

    William Safire wrote a column entittled "on language" in the NY Times Magazine Section each Sunday for the past 30 years. While the arbiter of all things correct, his primary tenant was that language's purpose was, first and foremost to communicate, and that usage trumped rules.

    Thus even though Dr. Krusen may well have advocated the notion that we are physzeeatrists, no one in the real world actually says that without sounding incredibly pompous and affected. So sure, use it when you interview to suck up to PD's and Department Chairs, but as you do so, recognize that, other than when speaking to Dr. Johnson, that is the last time you will have to say something quite that silly.

    Likewise, whether Dr. Johnson likes it or not, almost every H&P in hospitals across the country these days will include a stick figure representing DTR's, and references to UE's and LE's, not muscle stretch reflexes and limbs. He may see that as the end of civilization - I just see it as acknowledging that sometimes you just have to stop tilting at windmills
     
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