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I have good step 1 scores and mostly good evaluations, but one bad evaluation in medicine out of the 5 we got put me out of the honors range.

How important is it to get honors in medicine? I was junior aoa which I was hoping put me in the competitive range for top programs, but now I'm not sure. Thanks!
 

gutonc

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Well, since it looks like you want to do Derm, not IM, it won't be as big of a deal. But your competition will mostly (not all) have honors in IM so it might be a minor problem. But you'll probably be OK. Clerkship grades are just one of many factors that get looked at.
 
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Deferoxamine

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Other 3rd year grades matter A TON in IM, if I recall IM seems to care about them way more than other specialties like Surgery, Radiology, etc.
Honor everything else (i.e. CORE rotations, not just your little Cards elective) and you'll be fine. Destroying Ob/Gyn, Surgery, Peds, Psych, etc. with a strong showing in IM still shows your versatility and overall strength, which will matter.
 

jdh71

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Instatewaiter

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Derm vs top IM programs are about as far apart on the spectrum as they possibly can be. If you want something cush, you probably shouldn't do IM at a top program.
 
OP
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Sep 5, 2013
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Derm vs top IM programs are about as far apart on the spectrum as they possibly can be. If you want something cush, you probably shouldn't do IM at a top program.
Sure they are different but that doesn't necessarily mean I can't like both. A snickers bar and a steak are opposites on the spectrum of food but I like both of those.

Dumb analogy, but the point is that I like both for different reasons.
 

Instatewaiter

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Derm vs top IM programs are about as far apart on the spectrum as they possibly can be. If you want something cush, you probably shouldn't do IM at a top program.
My point is that no one goes into derm because they just love rashes; they go for a cush lifestyle. So choosing a top tier IM program just doesn't seem to fit.
 
OP
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My point is that no one goes into derm because they just love rashes; they go for a cush lifestyle. So choosing a top tier IM program just doesn't seem to fit.
The cush lifestyle is definitely a big draw but I also like many other aspects of derm. And no other field has all of those aspects, on top of there being a cush lifestyle.

So its hard to deny that I am interested in derm at least partly because of the lifestyle, but there really is much more to it than that. And I am interested in medicine for other reasons, and I could very well see myself enjoying IM even considering that it doesn't have the nice lifestyle advantage of derm.
 

JP2740

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Can someone answer the original question?
 

Instatewaiter

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Can someone answer the original question?
I'm going to differ from Gutonc. It has become more competitive since we have applied. Not having honors is a pretty big deal. However if the rest of your application has a strong record of good grades (ie AOA like the op) that blow to you app will be lessened.
 

Instatewaiter

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The cush lifestyle is definitely a big draw but I also like many other aspects of derm. And no other field has all of those aspects, on top of there being a cush lifestyle.

So its hard to deny that I am interested in derm at least partly because of the lifestyle, but there really is much more to it than that. And I am interested in medicine for other reasons, and I could very well see myself enjoying IM even considering that it doesn't have the nice lifestyle advantage of derm.
Oh come on... Is the other draw piles of money?

It's fine if it is but just don't blow smoke up my ass. Everyone wants a good lifestyle and money in the bank. I sometimes considered going back into the match to do derm but actually wanted to be a doctor when I was done so for better or worse decided against it.

As someone who went through one of those programs you are so keen on getting into, I can assure you it is the furthest thing from a reasonable lifestyle. My intern year was almost universally worse than any of my friends in surgery. Just make a rational decision if lifestyle is high on your list.
 

gutonc

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I'm going to differ from Gutonc. It has become more competitive since we have applied. Not having honors is a pretty big deal. However if the rest of your application has a strong record of good grades (ie AOA like the op) that blow to you app will be lessened.
You can still rescue it with an Honors in the SubI and the AOA helps which was my point.

My advice was specific to the OP's question. People generalize it at their own risk.
 

gutonc

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Maybe the OP meant IM/Derm and treating real skin disease and not being allowed to treat cosmetics?
Who's "not allowed" to treat cosmetics? You (specifically, you as an individual with an MD regardless of specialty training) can take a weekend course to get "certified" in Botox or Restylane or whatever crazy ass s*^t people are injecting into their faces these days.