Sep 19, 2018
7
2
I'm an American citizen studying at an Australian school.

Considering staying here in Australia but I'd like to know how hard it is to specialize in peds/ peds fellowships? Is there an equivalent to NRMP data that I can look at for Australia?
 

sean80439

7+ Year Member
Apr 15, 2012
345
143
Status
Resident [Any Field]
No. Talk to registrars or paeds consultants. The fact that you are studying in Australia and don’t understand the training pathways you plan on undertaking a bit concerning.
 
Sep 19, 2018
7
2
No. Talk to registrars or paeds consultants. The fact that you are studying in Australia and don’t understand the training pathways you plan on undertaking a bit concerning.
I'd like to know more about the training pathways, which is why I asked this question. I've done my own research but I wanted to know if anyone here has some information.

I understand that Australian training pathway is very different than the USA. I understand you complete an internship, residency, and can then spend years as an unaccredited registrar before taking up advanced training (ie specialization). I also know that peds in AUS is a 6 year program that includes a 3 year program under another subspecialty.

I'm asking about the competitiveness of peds if I were to apply AFTER going through the years as intern/resident/unaccredited registrar.
 

txm88

Radiologist - DNB, FRCR (UK), FRANZCR (Australia)
2+ Year Member
May 30, 2018
31
15
Status
Attending Physician
racp adult medicine and paediatrics training is not exactly as you have described
i know a bit about adult medicine training, and i am assuming that racp paeds is similar so anyone please correct me if i am wrong

it is a 6 year program in the sense that BPT is 3 years and advanced training (general paeds or subspecialty) is 3 years

at the moment, there is no rigorous selection criteria for BPT - you are eligible if you completed internship
but this will be changing (if not changed already) to be more strict

BPT > Advanced training > consultant is not streamlined 6 year program, and is contingent on
1) the person passing the FRACP written and clinical exams in a single attempt
2) getting into an advanced training position seamlessly after passing BPT - again competitive and specialty dependent

the fracp exams are ridiculously difficult and no one forgets about it in their professional life - many people spend much more than 3 years in BPT as a med reg due to having to repeat exams and hence it takes a lot longer than 3 years. similarly, people may have passed the fracp exams and BPT but didn't get into an AT position

I cannot comment on the competitiveness of an AT spot as there is no published data, but I imagine like all other specialties that there is a fair amount of competition and you are not entitled to one after BPT. but i think the consensus with med reg's is that passing the FRACP exams are the biggest hurdle in physician training, as well as finding a consultant position after advacned training

think of BPT as IM/paeds residency, and advanced training as the same as a fellowship. but unlike USA, in Australia it takes the same amount of time and training to become general physician/paediatrician than a subspecialist physician - as you are not recognised as a general physician/paediatrician after BPT (unlike USA where you can be a board certified generalist after residency).
 
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