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How do i find/approach a Dentist to shadow?

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ChewyDrop

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I need some shadowing hours, i really don't know how to approach them and don't know what to really say. Should I email or go up to their office and ask. "If" I do get a shadowing opportunity how do i log it? Do dental school just take your word on how many hours you shadowed?
 

Likkriue

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Which area are you from? I called up a few places before one bit in NYC. However I would suggest going to your primary dentist and ask.
 

Incis0r

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Call the offices of local dentists. I did it and got a "yes" after four "no" responses.
 

JLT223

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You don't need a log; you're expected to tell the truth. If the dentist writes you a letter of recommendation (which he/she should) then it's an excellent idea to include the approximate hours within the letter.
 

musicplease

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you just have to find all the dentists in your area and keep calling and asking if they would allow you to shadow

I actually had to call nearly 50 dentists until 1 finally let me
 

pgex2t

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1. Go online
2. Search for dentists near you you'd think would be cool to shadow
3. Walk in with your resume(s)
4. Ask if they would let you shadow
5. Repeat until yes

I haven't heard of anyone not able to find a dentist to shadow if they put effort into it. Dental schools generally take your word on it. They may ask you questions during interviews you should be able to answer if you logged an abnormally large amount of hours to verify.
 
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dent--girl7

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I talked to my PreHealth advisor in college and she referred me to some alumni. Fortunately, one of them was practicing close to my school and was more than willing to let me shadow him. You don't need to meticulously log your hours, but do keep a rough tally in your mind in case the doctor asks how many hours you shadowed him/her for their Letter.
 
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fogorvostan

I had a miserable time trying to find one in my area. Finally had to go spend the summer near my brother who is a dentist and found some of his friends who were willing to let me.
 

odent

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keep calling everyone till u land a shot.. i did the same and the only one that let me actually offered me a job with no experience lol
 

okiedokeartichoke

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At first, I e-mailed the dentists around my area and none responded back to me. The best way I got shadowing was to just call the offices, and it worked! Like @dent--girl7 mentioned, it would be a good idea to also check out your school's alumni network because there may be dentist alumni surrounding your school or hometown area who will be willing to help you out.
 

BioForLife

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Find a list of all dentists nearby on Google and then just go down the list and call each place asking if they would be open to having you shadow there for a certain amount of time.
 
N

NAVY DDS 2010

For those of you who had problems finding a dentist to shadow, there is a likely reason. Calling or emailing is NOT the way to set yourself for succeeding. When I retire from the Navy and open my practice, I'll reject every individual who calls me to ask. If I am going to give my time to help you, then you had better get off you butt and show some commitment. You are trying to be a professional. There is nothing professional about getting on a stupid phone and calling or emailing people begging for them to help you. Dentists are more likely to help you if you take the time to go to their office, set up a time to meet with them and fit your volunteer time into their schedule.

So, before anyone here chooses to call around, think again. Be a true professional. Get off your butt and make your rounds.
 
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Mhines24

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I need some shadowing hours, i really don't know how to approach them and don't know what to really say. Should I email or go up to their office and ask. "If" I do get a shadowing opportunity how do i log it? Do dental school just take your word on how many hours you shadowed?

Network with people ask all of your friends and family if they know anyone who is a dentist. That's the eaisiest way.
 

BioForLife

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For those of you who had problems finding a dentist to shadow, there is a likely reason. Calling or emailing is NOT the way to set yourself for succeeding. When I retire from the Navy and open my practice, I'll reject every individual who calls me to ask. If I am going to give my time to help you, then you had better get off you butt and show some commitment. You are trying to be a professional. There is nothing professional about getting on a stupid phone and calling or emailing people begging for them to help you. Dentists are more likely to help you if you take the time to go to their office, set up a time to meet with them and fit your volunteer time into their schedule.

So, before anyone here chooses to call around, think again. Be a true professional. Get off your butt and make your rounds.
I agree that going in person is ideal. However, if the OP is pressed for time, then calling is probably more efficient. Depending on where you live, some people don't have a dental clinic around every corner and going in person to each one might be a challenge. I called to ask, as did many of my classmates going into dental school, and it seemed to work out okay. Most dentists are pretty upfront as to whether or not they have time or ability to accommodate for shadowing.
 
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JLT223

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I agree that going in person is ideal. However, if the OP is pressed for time, then calling is probably more efficient. Depending on where you live, some people don't have a dental clinic around every corner and going in person to each one might be a challenge. I called to ask, as did many of my classmates going into dental school, and it seemed to work out okay. Most dentists are pretty upfront as to whether or not they have time or ability to accommodate for shadowing.
You're still better off going in person. It shows character.
 
N

NAVY DDS 2010

Yes, I agree it's the ideal approach.
There are always exceptions. I guess I wasn't taking certain limitations under consideration like location. But, being pressed for time or having limited time, I don't agree with at all. If you are pressed for time, then you don't have time for volunteering. People better learn how to sacrifice at times because once school starts a lot of sacrifices have to be made.
 
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Frychicken

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Put on a nice dress shirt too when you walk in to ask-100% success rate.
 
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