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How does hydrogenation cause trans-fats in oils?

zut212

Full Member
Nov 17, 2009
259
0
  1. Pre-Medical
    Trans-fats are a type of *unsaturated* oils that are very unhealthy. When we consume healthier unsaturated oils, they are mono-unsaturated or polyunsaturated.

    Hydrogenation has the effect of saturating these double bonds with hydrogens.

    So how does hydrogenating oils with double bonds, and hence, unsaturation, lead to creating trans-fats/oils?





    "Not all margarine is created equal. When shopping for margarine, keep in mind that the more solid the margarine (i.e. stick margarine is more solid than tub), the more hydrogenated oils it contains, which means more trans fatty acids per serving. Look for tub or liquid (spray) margarines with zero grams of trans fats and no more than 1 gram of saturated fat per tablespoon. Be aware that labeling laws allow companies to indicate zero grams trans fat on the nutrition label if the product contains <0.5 grams per serving. The best way to determine whether or not a product contains trans fat is to check the ingredient label. If it includes “partially hydrogenated oil”, the product contains some amount of trans fat. These small amounts of trans fat can add up if the product is consumed in excess."
     

    PiBond

    Call me Bond...PiBond
    10+ Year Member
    Aug 12, 2009
    623
    20
    Boston
    1. Resident [Any Field]
      Trans-fats are a type of *unsaturated* oils that are very unhealthy. When we consume healthier unsaturated oils, they are mono-unsaturated or polyunsaturated.

      Hydrogenation has the effect of saturating these double bonds with hydrogens.

      So how does hydrogenating oils with double bonds, and hence, unsaturation, lead to creating trans-fats/oils?





      "Not all margarine is created equal. When shopping for margarine, keep in mind that the more solid the margarine (i.e. stick margarine is more solid than tub), the more hydrogenated oils it contains, which means more trans fatty acids per serving. Look for tub or liquid (spray) margarines with zero grams of trans fats and no more than 1 gram of saturated fat per tablespoon. Be aware that labeling laws allow companies to indicate zero grams trans fat on the nutrition label if the product contains <0.5 grams per serving. The best way to determine whether or not a product contains trans fat is to check the ingredient label. If it includes "partially hydrogenated oil", the product contains some amount of trans fat. These small amounts of trans fat can add up if the product is consumed in excess."

      trans fats result from partial hydrogenation (if it were full hydrogenation we'd have a saturated fatty acid) and occurs when some of the cis double bonds are converted to trans
       
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