how I learned to ask more than one forum to solve the problems of my world.o

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Paiger Pie, Nov 25, 2002.

  1. Paiger Pie

    Paiger Pie Schizznitz McGee

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    Long time reader first time poster here. Seeing as it's still relatively early in the admission process, I'm inclined to forsake the pre-med forum and direct my question to the current medschool students... so I did at first, but after much thought and trepidation, I'll saddle y'all with this little cuandry of mine. I'll As a non-traditional med student hell-bent on applying ad-nauseum in 2003, should I limit my applications to non-top 10 programs? Even with excellent grades, scores, activites, I've heard that the strength of an apllication can actually be de-valued due to age (stanford in particular). Have any of you experienced this phenomena? please descibe any related personal experience, anecdote, etc... I guess I'm looking for a little guidance.
     
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  3. lola

    lola Bovine Member

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    stanford devalues age? i know it is in their formula for secondary selection, but i would have thought that it valued age b/c older probably means more experience. hmmm....

    i don't really think you'll have a problem as an older applicant unless you're over 40 or 50. even then, i don't think schools can legally discriminate.

    i wouldn't limit your applications to non top 10 programs unless your numbers are low. schools like ucsf are known to accept a large number of non-traditional applicants.

    it may seem like older or non-traditional applicants have less of a chance at getting in, but this is mainly b/c on average they have lower mcat scores and perhaps lower gpa's (i'm not sure). being older with more experiences can actually help you at some schools.
     
  4. gipper

    gipper Member

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    i would definitely apply to more than the 10 top schools regardless of your age and application. i have a friend who was unbelievably qualified - 1st chair violin, 3.92, publications, community service, etc etc - really outstanding. she applied to the top 10 or 15 schools and did not get accepted.

    rather than take a chance, i would cover my bases and that was her big advice to me...apply to a bunch, a spectrum b/c in the end we all have to take the same test...just a matter of how much risk you want to take...
     
  5. Kovox

    Kovox Going Places

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    I would suggest that you apply to vermont medical school. Vermont loves non-traditionals.
     
  6. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    You should direct your question to the the advisor at Portland State, Ms. Karen Hanson. CLAS/PO Box 751.
    503/725-5057.

    The information you provide here is insufficient and somewhat ambiguoius in meaning. For example "older"
    student. Does that mean you graduated college some years ago or that you just began college after being out of high school years ago. There is a significant difference between between the two and what I would answer would be quite different depending on your meaning.

    One of the worst errors committed by many students is being in a rush to apply. Many fall on their faces because their grades and MCAT scores do not meet the competition. The rush tempts them to overload semester credits and demanding course combinations. There are factors that enter into successful application other than grades and MCAT scores, including medically related experience, evidence of motivation, interview skills, letters of recommendation, selection of appropriate medical schools to apply to, not just a wish list. Students have been accepted into medical schools in their mid-50s, but the numbers drop off after about 40.

    I urge you to speak with your advisor, face to face, rather than rely on answers from people whom you don't know and who don't know you, including myself.
     

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