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how many experiences on ERAS?

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Sandlot1892

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i couldnt find anything like this in particular...

i mean, i get it that you shouldn't just pad your application with fluff...

my question is on average how many experiences does this leave people with? right now i'm only at 5 volunteer, 2 work, and 1 research.. and one of the volunteer is an interest group member which is pretty damn weak.

only asking because i asked a few friends here at school and they are saying 12 or 14 or 15 different things? anyone have any clue what is average?
 

2012mdc

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i couldnt find anything like this in particular...

i mean, i get it that you shouldn't just pad your application with fluff...

my question is on average how many experiences does this leave people with? right now i'm only at 5 volunteer, 2 work, and 1 research.. and one of the volunteer is an interest group member which is pretty damn weak.

only asking because i asked a few friends here at school and they are saying 12 or 14 or 15 different things? anyone have any clue what is average?

http://www.nrmp.org/data/chartingoutcomes2009v3.pdf
 

hothause

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I have 17, but in hindsight (I already certified ERAS) I probably could have left off a couple of things like work study jobs in college that were medical research related but not applicable to my future. My breakdown is 6 work, 5 volunteer, 6 research. I also spent two years off before medical school so I had experiences from that too and have had a heavy research focus both as an undergraduate and in medical school.

Fortunately, the most important things are also listed at the top of each category since they're the most recent. I think it's a fine balance between padding your CV versus listing cool stuff that may make you more interesting as a person but might not be directly related to the job of being a future resident (like research in other areas for instance). And, unfortunately I'm not sure where to draw the line since I think things like being an RA in college really did help shape me but others may think that's fluff.
 
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