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I know salary isn't paramount to most vets, but I'm just curious as to how high the salary of a vet can be? It would have to depend on location, clientele, specialty, etc. What are the most lucrative specialties, and how much can a canine specialist make?
 

GellaBella

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I don't think there is such a thing as a "canine specialist".

Typically the most lucrative specialties appear to be in Nutrition...presumably because you then work in industry (ie. Hills, Purina etc).

Lab animal medicine also looks like it is lucrative (again, working in industry or academia)

I've seen numbers of about $150-$200k and above for those two. Depends on how many years of experience you have.

Of course, I think when most people think of a veterinarian they think of someone in the clinics which can also be lucrative if you own a practice and have good business sense.

You can google the different specialties of veterinary medicine and I know for at least lab animal medicine there are reports every year on the average amount of money made including mins and maxes.
 

VeganSoprano

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You're right, there is no such thing as a canine specialist. The closest is an ABVP canine/feline specialist.
 
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Oh, okay. I just assumed there was a canine specialist, lol. How much can one in a private clinical practice make (if they own and run the practice)? Again, I'm not overly interested in veterinary medicine or any other profession just because of money. I'm interested in veterinary because of the work they do.
 

lailanni

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Oh, okay. I just assumed there was a canine specialist, lol. How much can one in a private clinical practice make (if they own and run the practice)? Again, I'm not overly interested in veterinary medicine or any other profession just because of money. I'm interested in veterinary because of the work they do.
Just like any other business. You can do poorly and go into debt/bankruptcy. You can break even. You can make a modest profit. Or if you're lucky, you can make substantial profit.

It also depends on what type of clinic you own. The spay/neuter shack isn't going to be pulling in what the 18 doctor specialty practice makes.
 

twelvetigers

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Quite a few factors there - location, clientele... are you a savvy business owner? How large is the practice?

Fresh graduates going to work for a clinic average about $65k a year. If you worked your way up to owning you own (successful) practice, I'm sure you could double that or more given the right circumstances. OR, you could do a residency and enter a specialty, like gellabella said - nutrition, pathology, lab animal all have the best average salaries.

Or, if you wanted to make a lot as a fresh graduate, food animal production and government USDA type jobs usually pay pretty well. But would not involve dogs. :)
 
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What other opportunities are there? Could you run a veterinary pharmacy? What do you do with specialties?
 
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http://www.acvcp.org/

This may strike your fancy in terms of specialties.

Here is an example of a veterinary clinical pharmacology residency: http://www.cvm.ncsu.edu/ed/res_pharma.html

A veterinary clinical pharmacology taught one of my pharm classes - quite a great guy, very knowledgeable, seemed to enjoy his job a lot. I believe it tends to me more research based with limited consulting.
 

Electrophile

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What other opportunities are there? Could you run a veterinary pharmacy? What do you do with specialties?
One of our pharmacists with a PharmD degree in our teaching hospital is also a DVM. She mostly works in the pharmacy, but she was working in community practice the other day when I brought two of my dogs in.
 

Kane2000

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vets are one of the least paid health professions. I'm a vet student but im not in it for the money. However in case all you want is money, well there is equine practice. If you work with really good thoroughbreds you could potentially earn up to half a million per annum. Otherwise most vets max out at about 100k. So please don't choose it for the money.

What you're perhaps referring to is "small animal surgery" or "small animal medicine". These are specialties that require 3-5 years of extra study not to mention it is extremely competitive to get into these programs. Something like over 60% of all vets are general practitioners. Only a handful are good enough to get into specialist schools.

If you do become a specialist you could earn a bit more but it won't be a whole lot different because overhead costs at specialist practices are extremely high.

And vets have massive student debts. Considering we have the same level of debt as MD's and we get paid a lot less than them, if you're smart you won't pick to become a vet for the money. You would be smart to become a vet for the passion.

Oh also don't forget that there is massive risk involved. If you work with large animals such as horses, the job is extremely dangerous. I work with relatively small animals at an animal shelter as a tech. Within 1 month I have got 2 needle stick injuries and got bitten really badly by a cat. Lots of injuries happen to our vets as well.

My suggestion: Do as MUCH work experience as possible. Try to get experience working with all kinds of animals. If you still enjoy the smell, danger, pissed off customers, low pay and most of all love animals you'll make a great vet.

All the best with your choice of career
 

chris03333

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vets are one of the least paid health professions. I'm a vet student but im not in it for the money. However in case all you want is money, well there is equine practice. If you work with really good thoroughbreds you could potentially earn up to half a million per annum. Otherwise most vets max out at about 100k. So please don't choose it for the money.

What you're perhaps referring to is "small animal surgery" or "small animal medicine". These are specialties that require 3-5 years of extra study not to mention it is extremely competitive to get into these programs. Something like over 60% of all vets are general practitioners. Only a handful are good enough to get into specialist schools.

If you do become a specialist you could earn a bit more but it won't be a whole lot different because overhead costs at specialist practices are extremely high.

And vets have massive student debts. Considering we have the same level of debt as MD's and we get paid a lot less than them, if you're smart you won't pick to become a vet for the money. You would be smart to become a vet for the passion.

Oh also don't forget that there is massive risk involved. If you work with large animals such as horses, the job is extremely dangerous. I work with relatively small animals at an animal shelter as a tech. Within 1 month I have got 2 needle stick injuries and got bitten really badly by a cat. Lots of injuries happen to our vets as well.

My suggestion: Do as MUCH work experience as possible. Try to get experience working with all kinds of animals. If you still enjoy the smell, danger, pissed off customers, low pay and most of all love animals you'll make a great vet.

All the best with your choice of career
Equine practice has some of the lowest paid vets there is. You have to make a name for yourself while earning less than crap wages in order to make money in equine practice
 

JosephKnechtDVM

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Veterinarians do not make enough money to justify the cost of veterinary school and now the post DVM residencies that almost seem necessary since school do not teach you how to do anything so you can make a living. Better off getting a master's in physician assistant (2.5 yrs) at less cost and with better starting salaries ($90,000) and prospects in the future. Veterinary medicine is heading for the iceberg with morons at the helm.
 

JosephKnechtDVM

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To all who think the money is not important:

Is being a vet so important that you would actually work for free? Is it like a religious calling that is worth being impoverished for the remainder of your life?

I became a vet because enjoyed animals and science but also because I wanted to make a good living at it. Was I wrong to want to make a living comparable to a dentist with similar level of education and training?
 
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While I'm hesitant to agree with someone who seems like they are trying to dissuade people from their chosen path 9my next post will address that ridiculousness)....he has a point.

All of this 'Oh, i didn't get into this for the money' and 'Money isn't important' - utter cr*p.

When you have to choose between food and gas, walk 4 miles to work to pick up your work check because your gas tank is empty, dig for change in order to buy a packet of ramen noodles...then talk about money not mattering, Anyone who says money doesn't matter has never been truly poor. Like it or not, money DOES matter in this society.

Of course we deserve more than we get. but fact of the matter is, we don't get it, and won't because let's face it: human life is valued >>>> animal life and that's where the money is, like it or not. But I'd rather do a job that I love getting paid moderately than a job I hate getting paid a lot. Do I sometimes think I should have gone into human pathology? Of course, I look at my debt and go WTF were you thinking. But then I remember that it is the variety and science particualr to veterinary medicine that put me down this path. And that's better than a huge salary. But again, I sure as hell am not going to accept pittance for the rest of my life. The money arguement is a 2 way street.
 
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However, as an addendum to my money comments, I can't let your repetitious posts about slamming vetmed go.

We are all aware of the financial difficulties of this particular profession, and we don't need bitter, petty people coming on here to whine and moan about how horrible things turned out for them, how the profession is headed down the toilet, and how we had better do something else.

Instead of making the situation worse, drop out and go do something else if you feel so undercompensated. Quit it with the sour grapes business - you know damn well all of us struggle with it. The only things posts like yours do is make people feel like crap about the field they are drawn to and want to dedicate their lives to.
 

Nexx

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To all who think the money is not important:

Is being a vet so important that you would actually work for free? Is it like a religious calling that is worth being impoverished for the remainder of your life?

I became a vet because enjoyed animals and science but also because I wanted to make a good living at it. Was I wrong to want to make a living comparable to a dentist with similar level of education and training?

Impoverished for the rest of your life? really? Sorry that you made poor financial choices, perhaps you didn't educate yourself on career path you chose and should have gone into another one (as you've stated you wished you had done)

Most of us go into the career with eyes wide open, planning for the initial debt and adjusting life choices based on that.

I plan to have my debt paid off in 15 years (10 is doable) -- assuming I do this as a sole earner/without income from gf/wife. The longer you leave the debt, the more you pay. Yeah it may require still living meagerly (still above how I'm living now), but yeah not a life long sentence.

Sorry, I think $60k/year (after 10 years, 80-90k is even better) is a perfectly high salary to live on quite comfortably. Especially in a dual income household. Maybe I buy an older house, have used cars, and only have one kid. Choices Joseph, choices (..and a bit of education in your path to making them)
 

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Off topic: WhtsThFrequency, I have this image of pathologist getting around, looking just like your avatar. I sincerely hope you are that cool in real life. Our histo/path lecturer IS that cool in real life... hence why histo is one of vet students fave subjects here at murdoch. Probably the ONLY vet school in the world where students love histo lectures...

On topic: Yeah, you'll probably never make bank as a vet. Yeah, the hours are long and stressful. But I actually can't imagine doing anything else with my life. If you're so disillusioned, leave the profession. There are plenty of people who want to fill your shoes, who will take the crappy pay.

You wouldnt get me to go be a human doctor for anything in the world (except maybe my dog, or my fertility. But those two things aside...)

And I know plenty of vets here in Australia who ARE making bank. Admittedly, I currently live in one of the wealthiest suburbs in Australia, and work in several vet clinics in the surrounding suburbs, so much of it was money they would have had anyway. But I also know a vet who came over from the US 30 years ago, paid off his student loans when the exchange rate was absolutely ****e, and owns his own extremely successful practice today, and manages to regularly update our equipment no worries, send his kids to one of the countries best private schools, and pay all his staff generously with huge bonuses. Yes, he is a good businessman, but mostly he is an EXCELLENT vet, who only hires excellent, passionate, compassionate staff. Because of that, they have one of the most loyal and trusting client bases I have ever experienced in the veterinary industry - and thats how you make money.
 
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To all who think the money is not important:

Is being a vet so important that you would actually work for free? Is it like a religious calling that is worth being impoverished for the remainder of your life?

I became a vet because enjoyed animals and science but also because I wanted to make a good living at it. Was I wrong to want to make a living comparable to a dentist with similar level of education and training?
Even $60k a year is hardly living off pocket change and ramen noodles. Nobody is asking anyone to work for free - you're offering a false choice.

There's nothing wrong with wanting to make a good living, but I'm in this for the work itself and its intrinsic rewards, not the cash. If I cared about money, I could easily have applied to medical school and done similar work for several times the pay.

Do vets probably deserve more than they get, considering the work they do? Certainly. Should that keep a dedicated person away? No way.
 

sumstorm

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I use to work longer hours than the majority of vets that I know and made $30k a year and lived comfortably. I loved my work, showed up at 6am, sometimes didn't go home at night, and poured myself into it. I am pretty sure life will be just as good as a vet....but maybe I just don't need that much. I expect to pay my debt off in 10 years if I never put extra money into it...but I forsee us folding tax returns and any other excess into that debt as well. We already own houses. It is all about choices. I think everyone should go in with eyes wide open, but doomsdaying isn't any more useful than playing pollyanna.
 
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Off topic: WhtsThFrequency, I have this image of pathologist getting around, looking just like your avatar. I sincerely hope you are that cool in real life.

Er....of course I am *quickly hides her textbooks and lab materials and strikes a badass pose* :whistle: If only I was as cool as The Lonely Island, I'd be set for life. Hey, THAT's what I shoulda done rather than end up impoverished! *sneaks off to transform her also super-cool bacteria and go to journal club/rounds*
 
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alliecat44

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I have to say that I think Dr. Knecht does have a point. Here is an excellent article that crunches some numbers and offers some perspective: http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=616838&pageID=1&sk=&date=

Veterinarians who graduated 30 years ago did NOT have the same debt:income ratio that we will have upon graduation. Comparing our situation to theirs is a folly.

If you are financing an out of state education entirely on loans (like I am)--making $60K/year as the sole breadwinner is NOT enough to hope to pay back your loans more quickly than 30 years--regardless of how frugally you live.

If you are paying in-state tuition or able to fund a significant portion out of pocket, then good for you. I've received almost $20K in scholarships, but that's still less than a single semester's worth of tuition alone--for an in-state student, that would be 125% of an entire year's tuition.

Keep in mind that debt levels vary highly on here...
 
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I think we can all agree to some degree (no rhyme intended) that he has a point in terms of lack of compensation for time and education given, and that veterinary medicine can definitely be a difficult field to be financially well-off in. Especially when you take into consideration the ridiculous blow-up in schooling costs that is definitely NOT linear with compensation increases....My issue was with the way he was going about making said point.

i like that the article mentioned government involvement, or lack thereof, in higher education. Everyone is all happy about funding etc to send kids to college...which is fine, don't get me wrong...but people pursuing higher education get *totally* shafted.
 

sumstorm

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A lot of it will depend. My max graduating debt is $119k...and that is if I have to take out additinal child care funds. So some of it will depend on individual.
 

david594

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Even $60k a year is hardly living off pocket change and ramen noodles. Nobody is asking anyone to work for free - you're offering a false choice.
With 200k in student loans that $60k a year is basically going to equate to pocket change and ramen.
 

alliecat44

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Well, I'm not taking out $200k in student loans. If you do that, you might have a problem, but that's where planning comes in.
Perhaps you are unaware, but the current average student loan debt for 2009 graduates is $129,000. That's including people with $0 in loans.

Keep in mind that for most schools, out of state tuition is at least $35K a year and can go up to $50-60K/year.

Some people do not have the choice of going in-state.

Some schools (such as mine) have over 50% of their students as out of state students--which means that 50% of their graduates will have very considerable debt.

Just FYI, if you haven't yet done any research.

Also, tuition is considering to rise 8.5% a year on average--while salaries are rising at a 3-4x slower pace.

There's only so much "planning" you can do.
 
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I am aware, and 129k != 200k by a long shot. I'm going out of state and still will not be paying that much because of a deal I've made with the school. There is no need to get defensive, I'm merely pointing out that $200k is not the norm.

It sucks that you are paying that much, I agree, but even students with no in state school have the extreme option of moving to another state prior to applying in order to get IS tuition. I don't mean to say that people paying more failed to plan - rather, I am saying that extra planning can bring the cost down if one does not expect to be able to afford OOS tuition. You took a calculated risk and followed your dream in spite of high costs, expecting to pay it back. That's commendable, but others might not see taking out large loans as a viable option for them, you know what I mean?

Edit: Argh, I am trying to make this sound as conciliatory and inoffensive as possible, but I don't know if it's coming across. Suffice to say I'm not trying to fight about it, I get that vet school can be expensive, but I doubt that many people are willing to take out such impossible loans if they perceive such tiny returns. I'd rather decline and reapply next cycle than drive up that kind of debt.

Perhaps you are unaware, but the current average student loan debt for 2009 graduates is $129,000. That's including people with $0 in loans.

Keep in mind that for most schools, out of state tuition is at least $35K a year and can go up to $50-60K/year.

Some people do not have the choice of going in-state.

Some schools (such as mine) have over 50% of their students as out of state students--which means that 50% of their graduates will have very considerable debt.

Just FYI, if you haven't yet done any research.

Also, tuition is considering to rise 8.5% a year on average--while salaries are rising at a 3-4x slower pace.

There's only so much "planning" you can do.
 
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What sort of "deal" is this, if I may ask?
There is a recruiting incentive for DVM/PhD students that gives them a substantial discount on tuition for the last 2 years (after the PhD). Dual-degree students also automatically become Minnesota residents during the PhD component of their program (if they didn't already work to become a resident 1st year like I'm planning to try and do), so they basically get discounted In-state tuition for at least the last 2 years, even as OOS students. All in all, things should add up roughly the same as if I was in-state.

The trade-off is that I have to go to school for 7-8 years and finish my PhD on a tighter timetable than most people would. I also don't get summer breaks b/c I have to stuff my 1st year research rotations into the 1st 2 summers, and I'll be graduating with the vet class of, gosh, like 2017 or 2018? It's not the kind of thing you'd do just for the money, but since i wanted to do the dual degree program anyway, it was a nice perk.
 
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....then you do agree with Dr. Knecht after all......
I'm saying Dr. Knecht's "choice" is bull****. It's not real. It's a false dichotomy.

Sensible people aren't choosing to take out $200k loans for $60k lifetime salary. Nor does anyone really expect to make 120k+ DDS salaries starting out in vet med. The majority of people are like you and me - taking on significant but not unreasonable debt with the goal of making enough money to pay it back. And that's what we'll do. I never advocated driving yourself into debt to run free clinics - I simply said that the unfair pay : debt ratio shouldn't be a deterrent to a truly determined applicant.
 
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david594

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The majority of people are like you and me...
Nah, the majority of people are like us (DVM students), not DVM/PHD students.

You can't really compare the 2 on equal levels. Whats the average DVM/PHD students graduating debt?
 
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Nah, the majority of people are like us (DVM students), not DVM/PHD students.

You can't really compare the 2 on equal levels. Whats the average DVM/PHD students graduating debt?
Like I said above, about the same (maybe a smudge more) as an IS vet student at Minnesota, in my case. All the incentives an disadvantages kind of cancel out for me since I'm OOS.
 

david594

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Its apples to oranges. You can't compare the loans people are taking out for just a DVM with that of a DVM/PhD student, when the combined programs offer extra benefits like in-state tuition, reduced tuition, and stipends.

Well, I'm not taking out $200k in student loans. If you do that, you might have a problem, but that's where planning comes in.
Sure $200k in loans isn't the norm(yet), but neither are DVM/PhD combo programs the norm.
 

karmapple

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I find it funny you actually don't think that 200K is the norm. Here at OSU we get 40 out of state students per year, and I'm betting most of them will graduate with debt around that number. Add up all the out of state students around the country, and think about that. Add in students at private schools (Tufts, UPenn, Cornell, Western...) that have in-state tuition that can be just as expensive as out of state tuition at other schools. Think about how many people that is.

The fact is, those spots are available, and someone is going to take them. You can smugly feel superior to those people all you want, but what if that was your only choice? I very much doubt there will ever be a time when all the vet school applicants boycott the out of state spots and refuse to take them, so yes, we are graduating A LOT of veterinarians every year with A LOT of debt. Blaming them for it won't help anything.
 
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Perhaps you should take a closer look at some of the threads in the pre-vet forum...
So we're going to all be earning $60,000 a year for 30+ years? Is that really what you're arguing? From bls.gov: "Median annual wages of veterinarians were $79,050 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $61,370 and $104,110. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $46,610, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $143,660." The wages can and do go up. Big loans can be manageable if planned right.

I don't understand what point you are trying to make. If you really think Knecht is right, then anyone taking out loans to go to vet school is an idiot, because they'll never make the money back. Go back and look again at the argument you're agreeing with and defending - he's prophesying the doom of the vet profession and perpetual poverty for all vets. I'm saying that it's managable, and it certainly shouldn't stop people from becoming vets. Is that really so hard to agree with?

@david: Which is why I adjusted the tuition based on those factor to compare it to other schools. It comes out close to in-state tuition, because I have to pay OOS tuition for the first vet year. Stipends hardly enter into it, because I'm not going to be paying off any loans on 24k a year - grad school will basically be a frozen period where loans sit, and the unsubsidized ones accrue interest.

I'm not sliding into school on a tidal wave of free money. When I said "like you and me", I meant that we are making a choice that makes financial sense, even if it is unfair.

Edit: Okay, screw it, that's it. I'm not blaming anyone for their debt. I don't smugly feel superior to anyone. I'm under siege and trying to defend a statement that really shouldn't need defending. I'm saying if you really thought it was impossible to pay back your loans, you wouldn't be in vet school right now. Why don't you try reading what I'm writing instead of picking at every little foible.
 

david594

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I don't understand what point you are trying to make.
You seemed to imply that those of us taking out $200k in students loans have this "problem" as a result of poor planning on our part?

The reality is none of us are expecting to make 60k our entire career just like you pointed out. I expect to be able to manage my nearly 200k in debt, but it definitely takes planning. Were just going about it a different approach than you are.
 
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You seemed to imply that those of us taking out $200k in students loans have this "problem" as a result of poor planning on our part?

The reality is none of us are expecting to make 60k our entire career just like you said. I expect to be able to manage my nearly 200k in debt, definitely takes planning. Just a different approach than you are taking.
*Sigh.*

That is not what I meant. You guys have taken the word "planning" and run with it. I mean exactly what you just said in your edit, that if we plan our future, know what's coming up, and make an investment in vet school that we know we can pay back, Knecht is wrong and we should not avoid the vet profession and become a PA.

You guys just blew up and threw this tidal wave of criticism at me over misinterpretation of that one word. I couldn't understand what you were all so emphatically disagreeing with - it seemed impossible to me that a vet student could really think that vet school wasn't worth it and they'd never pay the loans back - but now I see it was the word "planning". Sorry if I came across as rude, it's hard to sound polite and nice when you're defending yourself against an out-of-the-blue criticism explosion, and I really had no idea what was going on.
 

david594

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:)

I think were all really on the same page with this one. Sensible people are not taking out $200k in loans expecting to make $60k a year for the rest of our lives. I think most of us(except the equine people and those seeking advanced training) are hoping to make more than that our first year out of school. And ideally make a fair bit more than that during our careers.

There is always going to be better money in other fields, but the money in veterinary medicine for the majority of people hasn't gotten so bad yet making it a horrible field to go into.

Oh, I am really hoping to not pay all of my loans back. My goal is Income Based Repayment + Public Service Loan Forgiveness! I'n some ideal world I hope to only pay back a fraction of my loans.
 
Jan 31, 2010
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:)
IThere is always going to be better money in other fields, but the money in veterinary medicine for the majority of people hasn't gotten so bad yet making it a horrible field to go into.
Tiktaalik said:
There's nothing wrong with wanting to make a good living, but I'm in this for the work itself and its intrinsic rewards, not the cash. If I cared about money, I could easily have applied to medical school and done similar work for several times the pay.

Do vets probably deserve more than they get, considering the work they do? Certainly. Should that keep a dedicated person away? No way.
See! We agreed all along :p

I hope that loan plan works out well for you - sounds like a good deal if you can pull it off.
 
Mar 29, 2010
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so now that the dusts has settled, does anyone have any sources for pay? I've looked all over google and can't find anything beyond vets make about $60k-70k+ a year. Most interesting in the speciality side of things too. Surgeons to be exact. I found one website that lists the average pay as $183,00ish/year but I can't really believe that when I see all the other numbers. Not that I'm complaining, I'm well aware the debt of school can be paid off and it's more about the love of animals. Just curious on if there are ways to get the best of both worlds (good living and helping animals).

First post too. This forum seems really informative so I think I'll stick around during my college years :D
 
Jan 31, 2010
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Minnesota
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so now that the dusts has settled, does anyone have any sources for pay? I've looked all over google and can't find anything beyond vets make about $60k-70k+ a year. Most interesting in the speciality side of things too. Surgeons to be exact. I found one website that lists the average pay as $183,00ish/year but I can't really believe that when I see all the other numbers. Not that I'm complaining, I'm well aware the debt of school can be paid off and it's more about the love of animals. Just curious on if there are ways to get the best of both worlds (good living and helping animals).

First post too. This forum seems really informative so I think I'll stick around during my college years :D
Welcome, sorry to scare you with a battle on your 1st thread :p

I got my copypasta up there from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. It has a lot of good info. I wonder what site gave that high number - $183k is almost certainly not the average pay for a general SA vet. Would be great if it was, though, eh?
 

david594

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$183k for a boarded surgeon sounds possible though.
 
Mar 29, 2010
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Welcome, sorry to scare you with a battle on your 1st thread :p

I got my copypasta up there from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. It has a lot of good info. I wonder what site gave that high number - $183k is almost certainly not the average pay for a general SA vet. Would be great if it was, though, eh?
I really can't remember where I found it. Just random google searches and it popped up somewhere. Listed about 10 specialities, with nutrition being at the top making something like $200kish. I'm gonna try to find it.

EDIT: no luck with it so far :\ Seems to be kind of hard to find salary information for vets on google. I just remember it was some yellowish chart with about 10-15 different specialities. Nutrition being #1 at like $200kish and surgeon at $183k. Can't remember the others but I think the next one under surgeon was at like $140kish, couple around $100k then the rest <$100k. I just wish I could find it. That way people can determine if it's a good source or one that should be black listed lol

EDIT2: After doing a google search I found a website that linked to a post on this website that sourced the exact table I looked at.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=526047

That's the link to the forum thread.

My memories of the numbers where off a bit..but the top two where spot on pretty much. They claim it's from AVMA.

EDIT3: Here is the URL with the chart itself.

http://www.valuemd.com/veterinarian_earnings.php
 
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