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how much does postdoc, phD in biomedical field earn per yr in US?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Smooth Operater, Mar 16, 2007.

  1. Smooth Operater

    Smooth Operater don't bug "operatEr"!
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    how much does postdocand phD in biomedical research field earn per yr in US? What's the estimated range. I am a Canadian who is wondering how researchers are paid in US. :)
     
  2. epidemic8675309

    epidemic8675309 Mission to Save the World
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    depends on the funding mechanism. if an NIH grant, postdocs with 0 yrs of prior training get $37k stipend plus extra $7k for research/health insurance. as you train more years, it goes up slightly like 1k a year. but this is for NIH only.

    other grants from private foundations vary a lot- anywhere from low 30s to mid 40s-- again, depends on the field, organization, etc.
     
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  3. Mr. Tee

    Mr. Tee Indentured servant
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    Postdoc like 30-40k.

    After that, 50k-100k depending on job title, experience, tenure, etc.
     
  4. sirus_virus

    sirus_virus nonsense poster
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    This is probably another job you should not get into for money.
     
  5. green453

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    Postdocs start at $39k (if I remember correctly) at my institute which is privately funded. Health insurance + other benefits are given for free in addition to this.
     
  6. move2west

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    NIH has the highest pay rate in the country for post-docs, and they make around 40k a year + very great medical insurance.
     
  7. opusthecat

    opusthecat Junior Member
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    Unless you're directly funded by an NIH training grant it's up to the discretion of the PI. Most (but not all) do go by the NIH payscale which starts in the high 30's and goes up about 1500 per year. Benefits depend on the institution. At U of Colorado my health insurance was free, but it was a high deductible policy and I counted on not getting sick. A decent policy would have cost me $100 a month, but I think places other than Colorado (poor state funding) are better than this. Also, at most institutions post-docs aren't counted as actually faculty and therefore don't get benefits like a 401k. I always found it ironic that lab techs got better benefits than post-docs. Anyway, I digress.
     
  8. DropkickMurphy

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    You're apparently not a native Canadian, because no Canadian could have that ****ty of a grasp on English (not even those flaky, wannabe cheese eating surrender monkeys in Quebec ;) ). Face it, your language skills- rather the lack thereof- is what will keep you out of any good paying medically related job in the US. May I suggest returning to whereever you came from and entering the family business of goat herding, suicide bombing or whatever it is people do there.
     
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  9. melast

    melast New Member
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    If you work in industry instead of academics its a **lot** more.
     
  10. Steve203

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    random comment
     
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  11. AtreyuRocks

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    :thumbup:
     
  12. GoLAClippers

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    Actually, this job is a lot easier than working 60+ hours/week in the hospital
     
  13. DropkickMurphy

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    Pardon me for pointing out the obvious: that you should have a proper command of the English language to be in health care. That doesn't make me racist because for all I know he's originally from eastern Europe. My problem with him has nothing to do with where he is from or the color of his skin (frankly I could care less), but rather his inability to function at an appropriate level. If that makes me a prick, then so be it.
     
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  14. Dr.Inviz

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    Dude, you sound like one of those telemarketers from a 3rd world nation!

    You: "Hello, I am speaking to request information on how researchers do get paid in US ..."

    Me:

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. DropkickMurphy

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    [YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_XpyW7MEBg[/YOUTUBE]
     
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  16. VCgirl

    VCgirl New Member
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    To honestly answer your question....

    I am a BA chemist working at a pharmaceutical company in Boston and I make over 70K (excluding bonus, stock, ect). I am Canadian, but graduated from a US college and have 5 years experience in industry. I believe that PhD chemists make around 85K to start at my company.

    How much you earn also depends a lot on the company because I know that PhD chemists (with a post doc) started around 65K at AstraZeneca a few years back. Unless you want to move up in the ranks and have people work for you, I'd suggest sticking with a BA. You can earn your MA as you work and your company will pay for this! Another trick to boosting your salary is to jump around every few years :). If you want to get your GC you have to stay at one company until you have your I-140 for six months though, which usually translates into 4-5 years...yikes!
     
  17. Xibye

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    So years of hard work in research for a Phd, making close to nothing as a grad student, boosts salary by only 15k a year? Good to know. Really doesn't seem worth it.
     
  18. VCgirl

    VCgirl New Member
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    It's worth it if you want people under you, more respect (at some companies) and Dr. in front of your name, ect. Financially, there is not much difference working vs getting your PhD. There is a marginal difference between BA and MA salary. I made more working two years as a BA than just-hired MA candidates. That's why I said work and get your MA simultaneously. You can also start investing in 401K and IRAs earlier, too!

    As an associate, you have a much easier time getting a job at other companies. I know a lot of PhD chemists who have had trouble finding a job after getting laid off whereas associates get hired almost immediately since they are more in demand. The downside is being told what to do all of the time until you work your way up in the ranks (maybe 10-15 yrs to get to scientist level). You have to decide what is more important for you. I knew that I didn't want to be a chemist forever so I never considered grad school. If chemistry were my passion, I would want the title.
     
  19. Misfit!

    Misfit! Ihate everything aboutyou
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    Um, are you JOKING? We're talking about POSTDOCS here. Out of all the postdocs I've known and worked with in my lab days (at Harvard, a place with high hiring standards for postdocs), let's see, about 100% of them barely spoke English. It's pretty much a pre-req for a postdoc...be foreign, incredibly smart, and have very poor grasp of the English language ("Canadian" in this case may not necessarily mean born and raised).

    And to the OP the typical pay for a postdoc is.....crap.
     
  20. Dr.Inviz

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    You might also want to consider where you live, COL, etc. when discussing pay. I don't think one would receive 70K with a BA in the south ...
     
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  21. Doctor Bagel

    Doctor Bagel so cheap and juicy
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    Dude, it's cool to be a prick, but if you're gonna be a grammar nazi you need to make sure your grammar is cool, too. "Could care less" -- totally meaningless statement. Think about it. :)
     
  22. number77

    number77 Junior Member
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    The top payer is the US EPA with an average ranging from 43,106-$85,037
    That is not a typo, it is for postdocs.

    The highest paying grad school stipend is $30,000.

    And of course these numbers can be higher if the school thinks you are worth the money.
    (I see some of you having second thoughts now :laugh: )
     

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