Medical How should I list a research lab I only spent <15hrs helping out in?

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Goro

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    So to give context - I have 3 different research activities. One is my current gap year research (most meaningful). Another is my main undergrad research lab (~300hrs), which I began my sophomore year. However, during my freshman year mid-spring, I was in a different lab and only spent <15hrs there. I mainly just helped with running behavioral neuro tasks and organizing the resulting data. I was co-authored on a poster describing some of those results at a conference my PI went to. However, during the summer she developed an allergy to her animal model and ending up suspending her research for a couple of years. That's why I joined another lab and only had <15hrs in my first experience.

    How should I organize this in my activities? Would including that I only worked in my first lab for <15hrs look bad? Or would it be fine to just include just the poster co-author citation in the Posters/Presentations section and leave it at that?

    I definitely will make my gap year a separate activity. I also want sufficient space to describe my main undergrad research experience, which involved an independent research project that was presented at a regional conference.

    Any advice would be much appreciated? I have no idea what to do and don't want any potential "bad signs" on my application lol
    15 hrs is not worth mentioning.
     

    TheBoneDoctah

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      Should I still list the co-authored poster in my Posters/Presentation though? It was given at the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology

      I didn't attend the conference, but my PI did.
      Some people say don't list unless you presented the poster. My take (which worked well for residency) is to list it if you put in substantial work towards the poster. If you didn't really do anything and don't know what the research is, don't list it. You will need to explain your research and the role you played in getting the poster. As long as you are honest and don't say you presented the poster when you didn't, you will be fine.
       

      Goro

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        Should I still list the co-authored poster in my Posters/Presentation though? It was given at the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology

        I didn't attend the conference, but my PI did.
        Hmmm...getting a poster out of it has me advise keeping the hours in!
         
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