Other OT-Related Information How stressed are you about applications and OT in general?

Dec 23, 2013
22
5
27
San Jose, California
Status
Pre-Occupational Therapy
We're all going through it. We've all been there. Here's your chance to let loose a bit.

Personally, there's so much to keep an eye on. Applications taking their sweet time coming through. Evaluators procrastinating just as hard as a college student on letters of recommendation. A bit overwhelming sometimes. A long walk usually helps clear the mind.

Also, where the hell is the OT at the clinic I'm volunteering at? I've seen her, what, a total of three times so far.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3DtoOT
Jul 18, 2015
142
37
So many details to keep track of, no consistency among pre-req requirements, hours, etc. Intimidating hearing/reading how competitive it is. Potential amount of debt keeps me awake at night fearing it could ruin my life. And acceptances seem so random from the outside looking in. So yeah, stressful.
 
About the Ads

thebiggestsky

2+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2015
96
38
Status
Occupational Therapy Student
My biggest concern is probably just the time and money that goes into the whole process. I had already earned my BA seven years ago before I started taking pre-reqs last summer for OT. So I feel like I'm all in, but if I don't get into a program, then I have to wait a whole year. So yeah, the $$$. And the intimidation factor from other candidates who may have more OT or clinical experience. My academic abilities, I'm less worried about (although I should probably be more concerned about this, tbh, because grad school is grueling. And I was not the best undergrad student.)
 
Apr 30, 2015
30
28
Status
Occupational Therapy Student
My biggest concern is probably just the time and money that goes into the whole process. I had already earned my BA seven years ago before I started taking pre-reqs last summer for OT. So I feel like I'm all in, but if I don't get into a program, then I have to wait a whole year. So yeah, the $$$. And the intimidation factor from other candidates who may have more OT or clinical experience. My academic abilities, I'm less worried about (although I should probably be more concerned about this, tbh, because grad school is grueling. And I was not the best undergrad student.)
Ugh, I feel you, graduated with bachelor's in 2007.
 

Bokonomy

2+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2015
401
116
Status
Occupational Therapy Student
Very much so. I totaled my car in February without collision, had to pay for 2 summer classes (commuted and hour and back...the gas added up), got screwed over on hours this summer (had some weeks where I wasn't even doing a shift, have to pay for books for the fall, the MAT, and my apps. I really should have taken a year off I think, but I figured hours were always available before and I'd be fine. So yeah, money is the biggest issue. Interviews and my personal statement give me anxiety, but I took a practice MAT test and it said I should be between the 75 and 95 percentile. So I feel good about that, at least. Sorry for the vent, but I figured this would be the post for it.
 
Jun 2, 2015
137
38
Status
Pre-Occupational Therapy
I was super stressed earlier this summer. I could not sleep one night because of anxiety. Here are some things that have helped me keep the anxiety at bay and focus on applications, shadowing, and school (on top of work, and being a mom and wife):

1. Exercise and eat healthy
2. Spreadsheets to organize admissions info
*This makes it easier to compare the programs you are applying to, and you can list only the important info in your spreadsheet, which makes everything a little more consumable.
3. Start your applications early
*I do a little bit each night, which adds up to a lot over the course of a month or two or three.
*I set my own deadlines for references and submitting my applications. I want everything done early.
4. Stop reading and comparing yourself to others
*It's really hard, and I was guilty of doing this, but I made myself stop. Everyone has their own opinion. Put your energy in writing a better essay, reading OT books so you can discuss the field during interviews, obtaining more observation hours, etc.
5. Don't ignore the other things in your life that are important
*This was hard for me when I was younger. I feel that I am better equipped to juggle many things, now that I am older. For example, it's important for me to have quality time with daughter (playing a game, taking a bike ride, etc), so I always fit that in. If I don't, I feel horrible. If I feel horrible, I certainly won't be in the position to do quality work on my applications.
6. Make a to do list with time frames for completing each task
*You can't do everything at once. Keep a running list of outstanding items, and mark when you should be doing each item, and then focus on the items you should be doing now and getting ready for the next items on the list (register on time for classes, set up volunteer work if you need to do more in the fall, etc).

I hope you find this helpful!
 
Jun 30, 2015
39
6
Status
Pre-Occupational Therapy
I was super stressed earlier this summer. I could not sleep one night because of anxiety. Here are some things that have helped me keep the anxiety at bay and focus on applications, shadowing, and school (on top of work, and being a mom and wife):

1. Exercise and eat healthy
2. Spreadsheets to organize admissions info
*This makes it easier to compare the programs you are applying to, and you can list only the important info in your spreadsheet, which makes everything a little more consumable.
3. Start your applications early
*I do a little bit each night, which adds up to a lot over the course of a month or two or three.
*I set my own deadlines for references and submitting my applications. I want everything done early.
4. Stop reading and comparing yourself to others
*It's really hard, and I was guilty of doing this, but I made myself stop. Everyone has their own opinion. Put your energy in writing a better essay, reading OT books so you can discuss the field during interviews, obtaining more observation hours, etc.
5. Don't ignore the other things in your life that are important
*This was hard for me when I was younger. I feel that I am better equipped to juggle many things, now that I am older. For example, it's important for me to have quality time with daughter (playing a game, taking a bike ride, etc), so I always fit that in. If I don't, I feel horrible. If I feel horrible, I certainly won't be in the position to do quality work on my applications.
6. Make a to do list with time frames for completing each task
*You can't do everything at once. Keep a running list of outstanding items, and mark when you should be doing each item, and then focus on the items you should be doing now and getting ready for the next items on the list (register on time for classes, set up volunteer work if you need to do more in the fall, etc).

I hope you find this helpful!
The spreadsheet I made on google sheets help me out SO much.. I'm applying to 10 or 11 schools this fall and remembering deadlines and certain forms I need to mail in for each school would be impossible without some kind of organization. I would definitely recommend everyone do this!
 
Apr 9, 2015
17
11
I applied last year and thankfully got into a school that I am happy to be attending in a couple weeks. Last year during the app process was pretty stressful and filled with anxiety but it seems you guys are on the right track to lessening the anxiety wherever you can. Be organized. I made an excel spread sheet, like many of you stated. I had schools listed down the side and at the top I had things like Do they use OTCAS, log in info for each school's application (I started getting so confused and forgetting which log in I used for each school or sometimes they even assign you a log in), do they need the GRE?, I also listed my LORs and checked off when each letter was submitted to a program, I listed the supplemental info (essay, extra essays, pre-req forms, extra fees, CPR certs....etc) for each and checked off when I submitted them. Doing this made a world of difference.

One thing that also helped was never actually calculating my stats. Stats are big on this forum but I honestly didn't see the point in stressing myself out more. At that point, my stats were as they were and if I calculated them and started comparing myself to others Id go insane- more than I already was. I knew my grades could have been better, but I also knew I was a solid candidate who is so much more than just numbers on paper. Best of luck to everyone on here!! Everything will be ok :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: CAOT and kgprospot

thebiggestsky

2+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2015
96
38
Status
Occupational Therapy Student
I've got stats obsession!
You guys are right though, I need to just worry about myself and not anyone else!
 
About the Ads