Califo Cat

2+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2015
9
6
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Hey all,
I have an upcoming med school interview where I think they might ask me something like, "why don't you go to graduate school since you have so much research experience?" So, what do you think is the strongest explanation for wanting to do clinical medicine instead of pursuing research?
Thanks
 

gyngyn

Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2011
24,925
42,730
Status
Attending Physician
So, what do you think is the strongest explanation for wanting to do clinical medicine instead of pursuing research?
Your actual reasons.
Nothing is better than authenticity.

There are no "trick" questions. There are only poorly thought-out answers.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
About the Ads

MrLogan13

5+ Year Member
May 16, 2014
1,397
1,516
Status
Medical Student
What is your actual reason for wanting to do clinical medicine over research?
 
  • Like
Reactions: gyngyn
Mar 1, 2015
101
57
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I talk about how great of an opportunity it was to be able to participate in bench research and learn how it works and that I learned a lot of skills that will help me in medical school and ultimately my practice of medicine
 
  • Like
Reactions: Califo Cat

Goro

Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
59,036
88,776
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
We could tell the the best answers, but then we'd have to reject you.

Seriously, just answer from the heart. Stop thinking about what you think we want to hear.

Hey all,
I have an upcoming med school interview where I think they might ask me something like, "why don't you go to graduate school since you have so much research experience?" So, what do you think is the strongest explanation for wanting to do clinical medicine instead of pursuing research?
Thanks
 

Califo Cat

2+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2015
9
6
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I talk about how great of an opportunity it was to be able to participate in bench research and learn how it works and that I learned a lot of skills that will help me in medical school and ultimately my practice of medicine
For sure. Research is the best job ever you're so free to do whatever the hell you want to find the answer and you can work in lab all day and night, or whenever you like. So I'm definitely going to talk about how I developed skills like resilience and curiosity that will help me be a good doctor. I also want to say something like, "I want to do medicine to have a fulfilling career, because I know it will feel good to design treatments that have a huge impact on each patient and alleviate their suffering." The main points I can think of to support that statement are my shadowing and clinical volunteering
 
  • Like
Reactions: lomm
Apr 2, 2015
364
391
30
Topeka, Kansas
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
1. I'd prefer to apply my trade. Something hands-on.
2. Working with Pts is meaningful to me.
3. Publish or Perish is scary.
4. An M.D. doesn't preclude me from research as a profession, but getting an MD/P.Hd would be wasteful if I opt not to go into research and would steal a spot from someone absolutely certain.

If you can think of any other points, they would be really helpful for me. I think this is the outline i'll go with for the answer to this question though.
 

hoihaie

Membership Revoked
Removed
Mar 6, 2014
1,815
1,783
Status
Medical Student
For sure. Research is the best job ever you're so free to do whatever the hell you want to find the answer and you can work in lab all day and night, or whenever you like. So I'm definitely going to talk about how I developed skills like resilience and curiosity that will help me be a good doctor. I also want to say something like, "I want to do medicine to have a fulfilling career, because I know it will feel good to design treatments that have a huge impact on each patient and alleviate their suffering." The main points I can think of to support that statement are my shadowing and clinical volunteering
but you can't do whatever you want tho.. when you're a postdoc, you do what the PI wants even if you think a diff way is better or faster. when you're a young PI you do what gets you the most funding in the least expensive and fastest way. When you're a tenured PI all you do is write grants, attend meetings, and figure out academia politics, everythign except benchwork
 
  • Like
Reactions: Califo Cat

Califo Cat

2+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2015
9
6
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
but you can't do whatever you want tho.. when you're a postdoc, you do what the PI wants even if you think a diff way is better or faster. when you're a young PI you do what gets you the most funding in the least expensive and fastest way. When you're a tenured PI all you do is write grants, attend meetings, and figure out academia politics, everythign except benchwork
like you said, the PI is off writing grants and attending meetings. That gives the postdocs and everyone else a lot of freedom
 

Spector1

Orbis non Sufficit
5+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2011
1,785
1,888
Status
Pre-Medical
that's not really a trap question. That's a pretty legitimate question to ask a medical school candidate.
 
About the Ads