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how to become nurses aide?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by jintonic5, Jun 19, 2002.

  1. jintonic5

    jintonic5 Senior Member

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    how long does it take ? is it reasonable to think that i can get trained and work as one during my year off in between graduation and med school? if anyone knows i'd really appreciate it!
     
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  3. BushBaby

    BushBaby Nipplelina

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by jintonic5:
    <strong>how long does it take ? is it reasonable to think that i can get trained and work as one during my year off in between graduation and med school? if anyone knows i'd really appreciate it!</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Training in the NYC area takes about 3-6 months and you can start working after you take the state exam and pass with your certificate. You can work with your license during your time off. I worked as an on-call NA during my first year of college.
     
  4. DancinDoc

    DancinDoc Junior Member

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    Jintonic,

    It is possible for you to work as a nurses aide during your year off. I did just that. Fortunately, my local community hospital trains its own nurses aides, and it takes less than a month to complete the training. However, I don't know of many hospitals that do that.
    Note: I noticed that you are from Boston. The hospital I work at is 25 north of Beantown.
    Good luck
     
  5. jintonic5

    jintonic5 Senior Member

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    DancinDoc,
    Which hospital did you work at? Cuz if it's part of a hospital group(like the way Faulkner hospital and Newton-Wellesley are together), i'm thinking that they may offer a similar program at a hospital closer to me...

    another question, How's the pay? I definitely want the experience more than the money, but it's another factor to consider...
     
  6. uncwalley

    uncwalley Member

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    The pay for NA's sucks. If you have to eat and pay rent solely on the money you make as an NA, either go on a crash diet and live in some old lady's garage or find a new job. I'm an NA now, but fortunately I have a wife that makes a good bit more than me. Together, we manage to feed ourselves and our dog. Beyond that, we live quite humbly. That said, the experience you will get as an NA will make you a much better doctor. I work on a neuro/med-surg unit, and most of the doctors I see really pee on the nurses. They are so cold all the time, it is as if they don't realize that they talk to these hard-working young ladies every day. I will never be that way now that I've seen the other side. Sure, time constraints and pressure are gonna be an issue, but I'd rather leave the hospital fifteen minutes later so that I can talk to each of my co-workers in a respectful, concerned manner.

    (Steps down from his soapbox)

    NA work is great. You'll learn to be a million times more sympathetic to patient needs and expectations. You'll feel the satisfaction of tending to someone's most basic needs when they can't do for themselves. If you can work past money issues, you should do it. I took the NA certification class through a community college at the hospital I work at. It took two months, going to class two or three times a week for six hours per day.
     
  7. seaturtle112

    seaturtle112 Member

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    At my hospital I took a class for two weeks, then followed different people around on our floor for maybe two weeks, then I was on my own. I worked 12 hour shifts on a cardiac tele unit. It was a great experience. I made like $8.30 to start, then after four months and a couple more training classes i was making $9.10/hr
     
  8. </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by seaturtle112:
    <strong>At my hospital I took a class for two weeks, then followed different people around on our floor for maybe two weeks, then I was on my own. I worked 12 hour shifts on a cardiac tele unit. It was a great experience. I made like $8.30 to start, then after four months and a couple more training classes i was making $9.10/hr</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">sounds like my experience exactly. also made $1 extra/hr on weekends and 10% extra after 5pm. good experience to have, but boy was i glad to quit.
     
  9. LeslieKay

    LeslieKay Member

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    Another option is a nursing home--They trained me for free and I worked as an aide while I was in training. Once you get certified you can find a job at a hospital. Not sure if laws in other states allow this though...
     

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