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How to figure out the AAMC rationale in answering Verbal questions

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The Fuzz

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So I have been taking a bunch of verbals for my upcoming MCAT. I have been averaging about a 10 on the first 10 EK 101's, as well as AAMC 3-8. However, on probably 3-8 questions per test, I see why I got the answer wrong, and I don't agree with it. Like, given all the time I want, I still wouldn't have picked the given answer: I don't think it's as well supported in the passage, or I think that their assumption is too much of a leap, etc. Except it doesn't matter what I think, it matters that I figure out what the MCAT wants me to think. It's especially prevalent on the 101's, but i'm trying to tell myself that much of the logic that I find less-than-rational on the 101 won't be on the real exam (will it?).

I can't figure out a good way to predict the logic that the AAMC will follow, in order to get the "correct" answer. Does anyone have tips about how to overcome this? Maybe a rule that you follow that helps you decide in those iffy 50/50 situations?
 

INOHELP

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Rule 1: narrow down to 50/50.
Rule 2: What sounds most reasonable in your head.
Rule 3: pick the other answer.
 
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dudewheresmymd

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So I have been taking a bunch of verbals for my upcoming MCAT. I have been averaging about a 10 on the first 10 EK 101's, as well as AAMC 3-8. However, on probably 3-8 questions per test, I see why I got the answer wrong, and I don't agree with it. Like, given all the time I want, I still wouldn't have picked the given answer: I don't think it's as well supported in the passage, or I think that their assumption is too much of a leap, etc. Except it doesn't matter what I think, it matters that I figure out what the MCAT wants me to think. It's especially prevalent on the 101's, but i'm trying to tell myself that much of the logic that I find less-than-rational on the 101 won't be on the real exam (will it?).

I can't figure out a good way to predict the logic that the AAMC will follow, in order to get the "correct" answer. Does anyone have tips about how to overcome this? Maybe a rule that you follow that helps you decide in those iffy 50/50 situations?


No rules hard or strong. Verbal has the most variation. Just pick an answer choice that goes along with the thrust of the passage and hope that that's the one they're looking for. Score as close to 100% on easy/intermediate ones and let the hard ones go. I'm still trying to do this on my own and I know it's easier said than done, but that's basically all there is to it. You can retake a verbal section 5 times and still not get some of the questions right that's the whole point of the ambiguity of some of the questions. Anyone that says they can score 15/15 or 14/15 on verbal greater than 50% of the time is full of it. My friends who have gotten 13-14 on verbals all said they would not be able to do it again and walking out thought they had gotten a 9, 10, or 11. It all comes down to a bit of luck on test day.
 
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