lgher

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Spoken as a resident a few years from finishing residency....

One site chief has told me that what they are looking for in the community with regards to hiring a new anesthesiologist are the three A's

Amiable,
Able,
Available.....

There are some things you can do during residency to become a desirable asset to hospital's you are looking for work...I'm asking..what are they?

What do you think you can as a resident to maximize your desirability as a future staff anesthesiologist?
 

BLADEMDA

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Spoken as a resident a few years from finishing residency....

One site chief has told me that what they are looking for in the community with regards to hiring a new anesthesiologist are the three A's

Amiable,
Able,
Available.....

There are some things you can do during residency to become a desirable asset to hospital's you are looking for work...I'm asking..what are they?

What do you think you can as a resident to maximize your desirability as a future staff anesthesiologist?

Sounds like you are ready for that AMC job when you finish. But, do you really think the best groups only want those characteristics? How about adding these 3 to your list then discuss your "desirability" quotient.

Skill
Knowledge
Expertise

What are you bringing to the table to enhance the practice?
 

BLADEMDA

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Spoken as a resident a few years from finishing residency....

One site chief has told me that what they are looking for in the community with regards to hiring a new anesthesiologist are the three A's

Amiable,
Able,
Available.....

There are some things you can do during residency to become a desirable asset to hospital's you are looking for work...I'm asking..what are they?

What do you think you can as a resident to maximize your desirability as a future staff anesthesiologist?


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Amiable
Available
Able:D


You know those are the three things an AMC want in a prostitute.. I mean an Anesthesiologist.
 
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pgg

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Sounds like you are ready for that AMC job when you finish. But, do you really think the best groups only want those characteristics? How about adding these 3 to your list then discuss your "desirability" quotient.

Skill
Knowledge
Expertise

What are you bringing to the table to enhance the practice?

Quite a while ago, Jet started this excellent thread in which he wrote (among other good stuff)
jetproppilot said:
Most successful private groups are successful for a cuppla reasons: they are deft at anesthesia, and they know how to keep people happy. Successful anesthesia groups are able, amicable, and available.

I think skill/knowledge/expertise are implied by the able bit.
 

BLADEMDA

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Quite a while ago, Jet started this excellent thread in which he wrote (among other good stuff)

I think skill/knowledge/expertise are implied by the able bit.

This is a tough job market. While you may think skill/knowledge/expertise are implied I beg to differ. Again, what unique skill set do you bring to the practice?

In other words, why hire you over the other guy? Is it because the location is in the middle of BFE? A long partnership track with low starting salary? You know someone in the practice?

Sometimes it simply is getting a person to vouch for you. Other times the practice wants a Peds or TEE Certified Anesthesiologist.
 

cleansocks

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I'm wondering what path I should take (finishing up CA2 year in a couple months currently). I read through Jet's thread about how to be successful in PP and I think I satisfy some but no all criteria. I'm super easy to work with, laid back, non confrontational unless itll make a difference for the patient and even then calm and polite about it, and I'd like to think im fast and competent for my level. But I tend to be quieter and have different interests than most people (love jiu jitsu, delicious food, foreign cultures but know nothing about sports, could care less about local hospital gossip, things like that). So I dont participate much in conversations in the OR. The other major weakness for me is that I do not want to take lots of call. I just really dislike working in the middle of the night. Working hard during the day is fine with me but I'd rather be sleeping at night for the most part! Im not planning to do a fellowship until / unless the job market demands it. I have an MBA which isn't very marketable to anesthesia groups but if anything I might branch into something business related like venture capital if politics makes working in anesthesia unbearable.

But for now, my goal is private practice or non-big house academia (ie regional center that residents rotate through). I just don't know if Ill be able to find what I'm looking for in the competitive area I'll be moving to! I read about the "independent practice model" that someone in Jet's thread mentioned but I don't quite understand what that is - is it PP at one place without partnership track or is it more like locums? Anyway, thanks for any advice!
 

DrBeaker

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Just a CA 1 here so take this as you will.

Not wanting to take call is bogus. I don't think anyone loves being on call and working at 3 am. But crap happens, and we have to take care of our patients no matter the hour. As many others have said, this is not a lifestyle field. We all work hard and take call.

Not sure what my future holds as far as fellowship vs PP but when I get out I plan on working hard. I'll prove myself with my work ethic and taking call no one else wants.

I imagine finding a job with the traits you desire is going to be difficult. And you don't like sports so you are blacklisted in my OR. (now being serious, talk about your interests sometime. I wouldn't mind learning about some of the stuff you mentioned. I don't know anything about that stuff so I don't talk about it but would enjoy hearing from someone who does.)
 

TrustMe

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A briefcase with many small, unmarked bills is probably also a great way to secure a good PP job. Or a giftbag with some 18yr scotch and a box of cuban cigars (if you're into those things).
 

cchoukal

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Im not planning to do a fellowship until / unless the job market demands it. I have an MBA which isn't very marketable to anesthesia groups but if anything I might branch into something business related like venture capital if politics makes working in anesthesia unbearable.

Whether or not the market demands a fellowship is very relative. I know lots of groups that have peds and cardiac cover to call, and covering their call is a lot easier if everyone in their group has a fellowship in one or the other. Blade has also commented vociferously on the importance of fellowship training and its effect on marketability in the future days of limited physician anesthesia practice.

And if you can get a job in VC without carrying your own C, congrats (and tell me how!).
 

TheSweetness

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I'm wondering what path I should take (finishing up CA2 year in a couple months currently). I read through Jet's thread about how to be successful in PP and I think I satisfy some but no all criteria. I'm super easy to work with, laid back, non confrontational unless itll make a difference for the patient and even then calm and polite about it, and I'd like to think im fast and competent for my level. But I tend to be quieter and have different interests than most people (love jiu jitsu, delicious food, foreign cultures but know nothing about sports, could care less about local hospital gossip, things like that). So I dont participate much in conversations in the OR. The other major weakness for me is that I do not want to take lots of call. I just really dislike working in the middle of the night. Working hard during the day is fine with me but I'd rather be sleeping at night for the most part! Im not planning to do a fellowship until / unless the job market demands it. I have an MBA which isn't very marketable to anesthesia groups but if anything I might branch into something business related like venture capital if politics makes working in anesthesia unbearable.

But for now, my goal is private practice or non-big house academia (ie regional center that residents rotate through). I just don't know if Ill be able to find what I'm looking for in the competitive area I'll be moving to! I read about the "independent practice model" that someone in Jet's thread mentioned but I don't quite understand what that is - is it PP at one place without partnership track or is it more like locums? Anyway, thanks for any advice!

Your MBA is way more valuable than you acknowledge. Your MBA will put you at the dinner table and not on the menu. With the growth of anesthesia groups such as Team Health, you could easily become a regional director or at the least CMO of a hospital. In my opinion, most physicians would prefer a doctor as the CEO/CMO...
 

jwk

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There are a lot of different practices out there and some will have very little work "out of hours" so it's not totally unreasonable.

It's not unreasonable to look for a practice that doesn't do that much after-hours work, but most hospital practices won't be like that. If doing the late hours and call isn't your thing, but that's the norm at the practice you're interested in, it may be a mark against you as far as that practice is concerned. Or, they may be perfectly willing to accept you on a 40hr work week basis, but your chances of advancing within the group (partnership, etc.) may then be limited or non-existent.
 

cleansocks

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Nice to hear some don't hate me for wanting to take call less often.

re: how to be in VC without having capital: VC managers don't need capital to be managers. They are compensated with salary and bonuses if their investments go well. Capital is received by institutional investors (funds, private equity, etc) and then invested by the VC managers. I worked for a very early stage "VC" group (angel investment group) dedicated to healthcare investment where I, as the lowest on the totem, evaluated business plans and performed due diligence research on a salaried basis. Also, members/managers of VC's are generally active participants in the companies in which they invest the funds they receive, potentially acting as CFO's, VP sales, etc.

re: MBA is valuable - I agree to an extent but getting to a position like CMO depends just as much on interest in hospital politics/ethics, schmoozing ability, and the ability to manage very intelligent, stubborn people (docs). If I go to a private group and tell them, "I have an MBA, I want to do administrative work" I'm telling them, "I want your job and want immediate partnership status." As far as I see it, most groups/docs feel they don't need the extra help or degree and may actually feel threatened by someone saying they're the most qualified to run the practice!
 

cchoukal

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re: how to be in VC without having capital: VC managers don't need capital to be managers. They are compensated with salary and bonuses if their investments go well. Capital is received by institutional investors (funds, private equity, etc) and then invested by the VC managers. I worked for a very early stage "VC" group (angel investment group) dedicated to healthcare investment where I, as the lowest on the totem, evaluated business plans and performed due diligence research on a salaried basis. Also, members/managers of VC's are generally active participants in the companies in which they invest the funds they receive, potentially acting as CFO's, VP sales, etc.

I wasn't trying to front, I just hear a lot of physicians cite "consulting" and "VC" as their back-up for when the sky falls, and I was curious how all of us can expect to get into that line of work without any experience or coming with our own money. Obviously, you've got some experience in the field and you'd certainly have an upper hand. I'll be calling on you for an inside track in a few years!
 

nycitygas

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I wasn't trying to front, I just hear a lot of physicians cite "consulting" and "VC" as their back-up for when the sky falls, and I was curious how all of us can expect to get into that line of work without any experience or coming with our own money. Obviously, you've got some experience in the field and you'd certainly have an upper hand. I'll be calling on you for an inside track in a few years!

I've heard when you go the consulting route, you pretty much start off again at the bottom. Your pay scale and rank will be the same as the 22 year old fresh from Harvard. Which is why so few do it in the end.
 

MRW

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I wasn't trying to front, I just hear a lot of physicians cite "consulting" and "VC" as their back-up for when the sky falls, and I was curious how all of us can expect to get into that line of work without any experience or coming with our own money. Obviously, you've got some experience in the field and you'd certainly have an upper hand. I'll be calling on you for an inside track in a few years!
Getting a VC job as an MD is going to take a lot of highly specialized knowledge (i.e. cutting edge research background), a super fat trust fund, or an MBA...
 

ASA6

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I've heard when you go the consulting route, you pretty much start off again at the bottom. Your pay scale and rank will be the same as the 22 year old fresh from Harvard. Which is why so few do it in the end.

Actually, Im not sure this is true. The reason I know this is during the 2nd consecutive month of being QOD call for cardiac my CA2 year, I did what most residents do. That is, complain to anyone and everyone who would listen how I wanted to quit. Anyways, I talked to a few people in consulting about job prospects and explained to them my concern of starting at the same rank and pay as that fresh grad. Basically what I was told was that having an advanced degree in anything (JD, MD, PhD) gave you a leg up, and generally started out in the associate or associate VP level (depending on the firm), and pay starting between 100-160k/year. Eventually I decided leaving anesthesia was a terrible idea. But, while the pay isnt great, if you cant get a consulting job, it wouldnt be terrible.
 
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