Iatro

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Currently I am waiting for post interview decisions at 2 schools with one more to go. I don't think my interviews went spectacularly, so I want to plan for my reapp for next cycle EARLY, just in case.

This cycle, I submitted my primary 2nd week of August which I think is the source of most of my problems. Also, I think I am a relatively cookie cutter applicant, which does not help.

What I am hoping is for some of the more established members on SDN (in medical school or those who have served on an adcom) to look at my application and tell me how it can be improved. It would totally SUCK not to get in this cycle, but looking at it glass half full, reapplying would give me the opportunity to go to a top school potentially. Of my three invites, I was able to get two schools in the top 20. I'm hoping to have an app for next cycle that gets me multiple top 10 school interviews.

To give some details, I have a 36P, 3.9/3.9 from a top UC school. I am a california resident. I have basic science research, worked in a clinic for a year where I had she exposure to clinical research, tutoring ,teaching as well as some global health experience. To round out my apps, I am a pianist and was an athlete in HS at the state level, albeit I didn't continue this sport in college.

If someone who knows med school admissions processes would take the time to quickly look at my app and give insight into my chances for a top school, as well as suggest activities to be engaged in for this upcoming year to best round out my application for a top 20 (hopefully top 10 school) it would be GREATLY appreciated. I would owe you for life.

And if it is easier, please feel free to PM.
 

sinombre

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Currently I am waiting for post interview decisions at 2 schools with one more to go. I don't think my interviews went spectacularly, so I want to plan for my reapp for next cycle EARLY, just in case.

This cycle, I submitted my primary 2nd week of August which I think is the source of most of my problems. Also, I think I am a relatively cookie cutter applicant, which does not help.

What I am hoping is for some of the more established members on SDN (in medical school or those who have served on an adcom) to look at my application and tell me how it can be improved. It would totally SUCK not to get in this cycle, but looking at it glass half full, reapplying would give me the opportunity to go to a top school potentially. Of my three invites, I was able to get two schools in the top 20. I'm hoping to have an app for next cycle that gets me multiple top 10 school interviews.

To give some details, I have a 36P, 3.9/3.9 from a top UC school. I am a california resident. I have basic science research, worked in a clinic for a year where I had she exposure to clinical research, tutoring ,teaching as well as some global health experience. To round out my apps, I am a pianist and was an athlete in HS at the state level, albeit I didn't continue this sport in college.

If someone who knows med school admissions processes would take the time to quickly look at my app and give insight into my chances for a top school, as well as suggest activities to be engaged in for this upcoming year to best round out my application for a top 20 (hopefully top 10 school) it would be GREATLY appreciated. I would owe you for life.

And if it is easier, please feel free to PM.
There's your problem. And I'm assuming you didn't apply broadly. There's nothing inherently wrong with being "cookie cutter," but when schools can fill their classes with literally anyone they want, why should they choose you over a more unique applicant with an interesting non-cookie cutter background and similar stats?
 
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Iatro

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There's your problem. And I'm assuming you didn't apply broadly. There's nothing inherently wrong with being "cookie cutter," but when schools can fill their classes with literally anyone they want, why should they choose you over a more unique applicant with an interesting non-cookie cutter background and similar stats?
I understand that I am a cookie cutter applicant. Restating what I have already stated does not really assist me. What I am hoping is for someone to look at my app and give insight into ways to make it more well rounded/unique. For instance, I may start a nonprofit organization this year. How common is this? How about working as an EMT? How about an MCAT instructor? Working at the NIH? Learning a language?

And while I may be a cookie cutter, I do have pretty beastly stats which I feel does separate me from the pack to some extent. I think my app in its current state is modestly strong (validated by some top 20s) but I'm going for an app that get top 10/20s across the board. I often see on SDN people with comparable stats, yet they have invites from top schools. What I am hoping is for someone with a larger perspective of apps as a whole to tell me what I have to do to get to that level. I feel like I'm only missing a few pieces.

Thank you in advance.
 

Midifelder10

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You are an excellent candidate. If the schools don't select you this cycle it is their loss ( and yours too). The whole process of Med school admission has run amuck and is out of control if students like you cannot gain entrance. In feedback they wont be even able to tell you what was wrong in your application because the whole stuff is absurd. Keep the faith and hopefully you will get in. If not next year apply to at leat 10-15 schools. Good luck and you deserve to be in.
 
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You are an excellent candidate. If the schools don't select you this cycle it is their loss ( and yours too). The whole process of Med school admission has run amuck and is out of control if students like you cannot gain entrance. In feedback they wont be even able to tell you what was wrong in your application because the whole stuff is absurd. Keep the faith and hopefully you will get in. If not next year apply to at leat 10-15 schools. Good luck and you deserve to be in.
As a > 3.9 GPA > 35 MCAT candidate with a pretty unique app, who applied early to a smart spread of 25 schools, got less than 5 interviews (ranging from Top 10 to Bottom 10), and has been wait-listed or rejected at all of them, remaining faithful in a process as big of a crapshoot as medical school admissions is a poor choice. Sorry, I'm a little bitter. :mad:

Good luck, OP! You might want to lower your standards to a realistic level, or you might be seriously let down and end up with a big chip on your shoulder.
 

Irish Football

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OP I feel for you. I agree with the above posters, you do deserve to get in, it's a shame if you don't get in this year. I would be shocked if you applied broadly June 1st next year and didn't get accepted anywhere. Good luck. Man, this process sucks.
 

Midifelder10

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As a > 3.9 GPA > 35 MCAT candidate with a pretty unique app, who applied early to a smart spread of 25 schools, got less than 5 interviews (ranging from Top 10 to Bottom 10), and has been wait-listed or rejected at all of them, remaining faithful in a process as big of a crapshoot as medical school admissions is a poor choice. Sorry, I'm a little bitter. :mad:

Good luck, OP! You might want to lower your standards to a realistic level, or you might be seriously let down and end up with a big chip on your shoulder.
You too deserve to be in but the process is flawed and trust me it is not you. They are the problem you have done everything the system asks for.
 
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OP I feel for you. I agree with the above posters, you do deserve to get in, it's a shame if you don't get in this year. I would be shocked if you applied broadly June 1st next year and didn't get accepted anywhere. Good luck. Man, this process sucks.
As someone who did apply early (near the date specified), and have had AdComs reply "Your application is everything we expect, but we have more qualified applicants than seats" to every rejection with no suggestions for improvements, that is not a source of positivity. And yes, that wasn't just the automated rejection response, that was a Dean of Admissions. :oops:
 

Midifelder10

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As someone who did apply early (near the date specified), and have had AdComs reply "Your application is everything we expect, but we have more qualified applicants than seats" to every rejection with no suggestions for improvements, that is not a source of positivity. And yes, that wasn't just the automated rejection response, that was a Dean of Admissions. :oops:
That Dean was blowing the proverbial smoke. Ask him to prove that there were better candidates than 35 and 3.9 and he will fall short. Bottom line is they have their favorite candidates and you were not. These are public institutions and they should have an open door policy but unfortunately they don't.
 
Jan 9, 2013
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Since you say that you're "cookie cutter,"I think your strategy should be:

Immediately start shadowing some primary care physicians (family, geriatrics, etc), so you'll be more attractive to the SOMs that really like that.

Try to figure out if your LORs were very supportive or not. You attend a UC, did you use a prof who barely knows you? If you think one or two weren't, get others to write them.

Create a school list that includes the Calif SOMs (maybe leaving off the toughest ones) and Midwest and NE mid-tier private SOMs (like Creighton, SLU, MCW, Loyola, Temple, etc), maybe a couple of NY publics, and a few reaches. (Do you have any ties to other states?)

Submit primary the first day.

Have your secondary essays ready to submit when those come in.
 
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As a > 3.9 GPA > 35 MCAT candidate with a pretty unique app, who applied early to a smart spread of 25 schools, got less than 5 interviews (ranging from Top 10 to Bottom 10), and has been wait-listed or rejected at all of them, remaining faithful in a process as big of a crapshoot as medical school admissions is a poor choice. Sorry, I'm a little bitter

Sometimes I think that those with high stats have it harder than others. The top schools are too hard to get into and the lower ranked schools think you're using them as safeties. When someone with OK stats applies to a lower ranked school, the SOM thinks, "Well, he's not going to get accepted to the Ivies or WashU, so let's consider him."

Have you sent updates to your lower ranked schools diplomatically indicating that you're still available? They may think you already have a date to the prom.
 

Lysilegluleu

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You are an excellent candidate. If the schools don't select you this cycle it is their loss ( and yours too). The whole process of Med school admission has run amuck and is out of control if students like you cannot gain entrance. In feedback they wont be even able to tell you what was wrong in your application because the whole stuff is absurd. Keep the faith and hopefully you will get in. If not next year apply to at leat 10-15 schools. Good luck and you deserve to be in.
How can one assume that another deserves to be in medical school based on such limited information (e.g., metrics)? Numbers and ECs tell but a fraction of the story. Even a sociopath and pathological liar can qualify in those regards. Do they "deserve" admission to medical school based on those things alone..?

OP - I'm not saying you don't deserve it, for the record. In fact, I admire what your hard work has yielded. Just saying that numbers and ECs tell only a limited part of the story. In any case, good luck! And yes, maybe practice interviewing and apply more broadly.

I don't know why, but today seems like it's gonna be a great daaaaaaaayyyy...
 
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Things that I've heard are very positive are stipend volunteer positions like Teach for America (2 year commitment), Americorps(usually 1 year) or the Peace Corps (~2.5 year commitment).
 

yehhhboiii

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The replies here are ridiculous. You don't deserve anything. Medical schools owe you nothing. You're obsessed with prestige. Schools at the top of the rankings are full of people with better stats from more higher ranked schools with really unique experiences like starting an NGO or volunteering in Africa to help AIDS victims. Do you really think that the person looking at your application thinks "Oh my, his scores are much too high for our class. We don't want any of our students to do well and be successful. Reject."?

The real question is if you showed that you understand the realities of medicine and conveyed it through your words and deeds. Even schools that don't make it to the top 20 in the US News Research Ranking fill many of their interview slots with people that are just as smart as you. But they don't want students who can only do well on standardized tests and spend countless hours in the library. They want people who can relate to others and show compassion. They're looking for people who can be leaders of the healthcare team and can work together towards a common goal. Are you one of those people?
 
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Do you really think that the person looking at your application thinks "Oh my, his scores are much too high for our class. We don't want any of our students to do well and be successful. Reject."?
Guess you don't understand a school's concern about yield. They use a strategy. They often wait to see if an app gets withdrawn which happens after a high stats student gets accepted to one of their preferred schools.

It's not a question about whether they want their students to do well. It's just that they know that this hottie is going to blow off their school as soon as the star quarterback asks them to the prom.
 

yehhhboiii

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It's not all about stats. It's more about fit and who is the most interested in taking advantage of what the institution has to offer. I seriously doubt that concerns about yield will prevent a school from offering an interview slot to a desirable applicant. OP's concern is about getting more interviews from top schools. Schools can easily interview candidates and waitlist the ones that aren't serious about their school if they want to protect their yield. I doubt that Harvard and Johns Hopkins have trouble getting dates to the prom.
 
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It's not all about stats. It's more about fit and who is the most interest in attending their school. OP's concern is about getting more interviews from top schools. I doubt that Harvard and Johns Hopkins have trouble getting dates to the prom.

Of course not. That response was in regards to lower ranked schools' hesitancy...not top schools. The top schools are the star quarterbacks.
 
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Iatro

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This thread has digressed from my OP...

I don't believe the medical schools owe me anything. It is a competitive process, even with my stats and ECs (although I must admit, I sometimes wonder who is getting interviews/acceptances).

Again, if someone with knowledge of the admissions process, someone who has seen many personal statements, would take the time to look mine over, it would be GREATLY GREATLY appreciated. It's been a dream of mine to attend medical school for the entirety of college, and while there is a chance I still get in this cycle, I don't want to be caught with my pants down at the start of next cycle.

Does anyone know if LizzyM or someone similar to her provides such a service?
 

mcloaf

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It's been a dream of mine to attend medical school
The best route to reach that will be to stop focusing so hard to top X schools. You haven't posted the list of schools to which you applied, but judging by your earlier posts it was likely pretty top-heavy.
 
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Iatro

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The best route to reach that will be to stop focusing so hard to top X schools. You haven't posted the list of schools to which you applied, but judging by your earlier posts it was likely pretty top-heavy.
It was definitely top heavy this cycle. But I don't feel your advice and that mindset of thinking is the way to go. I've always strived (read:gunned) to be the best I can be. Looking at your mdapps, I am sure you approach what you are passionate about the same way.

Next cycle, I will definitely apply to more safety schools (if indeed I don't get into any of these three schools). However, I definitely want to find the ways to have a stronger application for next cycle. Again, I feel I am only a few steps away from having my pick of the top X schools. You look like you have done an incredibly good job this cycle, so if you would be willing to read my PS, I would appreciate it...!!
 
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Where did you apply?

Do you have any shadowing experience?

If you include some reasonable mid tiers and apply EARLY, you probably will have some success.
 

yehhhboiii

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That's not what gunning is. Can you explain why you want to go to a top school?
 

gyngyn

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That Dean was blowing the proverbial smoke. Ask him to prove that there were better candidates than 35 and 3.9 and he will fall short. Bottom line is they have their favorite candidates and you were not. These are public institutions and they should have an open door policy but unfortunately they don't.
It is a privilege to be a physician, not a right. Nor is it a reward for being smart or getting good grades. It is a field of service. A physician's training is paid for largely by the public (even at private schools). A school's responsibility is to those who will ultimately be the recipients of care, not to the applicants.
 
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Iatro

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That's not what gunning is. Can you explain why you want to go to a top school?
I want to go to a top school because of incredible quantity and quality of basic science and clinical research opportunities. Also, the fact they tend to be in large cities, which is the type of environment I see myself living my entire life. Also, I am interested in placing into a competitive speciality. Also, I am interested in academic medicine and working as a physician at a large medical center that teaches future students.

And trust me, I know what gunning is :p
 
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Latro, I'm going through a similar predicament. Although you do have a higher MCAT score than I do. Some schools don't tell you anything about your application if you call, ie: Pitt, Boston, NYU, or Cornell. Some are very open about it though. You pretty much have to cold email every school that has rejected you and see if the dean is willing to go over your application. There are some that do this. Some schools aren't just interested in your secondary fee, they want to actually help you as a student. Without knowing where you applied, all I can tell you is try everyone. It does show determination and if you have to reapply, you can mention that "so and so" at "Medical school X" told me that I was weak in "y" here and so I improved on it. That holds clout.

That's really the only advise I can give you. Going by numbers you really do "deserve" a seat (I don't care what these other peope on here say). The top schools are just ridicously hard to get into these days. A dean of admissions told me that they received a 30% increase in applications in a peroid of the past two years. More applications = more kids taking the MCAT = more high scores. A lot more Ivy undergrads are moving to medicine from the typical routes and anyone who tells you prestige doesn't hold weight in this process is in denial (I guess I'm in denial right now, but not about that).
 

txMed7

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Yeah I feel you. My stats are (3.86/3.91; 33R Edit: Actually, 3.91 is my non-science GPA. Science GPA is 3.85. cumulative = 3.86.) but I applied to mid-tier (50-70) a couple of non-ranked low tiers and one upper mid tier (22 or so) and received one interview at a mid tier and one interview at the upper mid tier (UTSW) and 0 interviews at the low tiers.

More applications = more kids taking the MCAT = more high scores
The distributions are still the same. A 36 is still in the 97th percentile of all test-takers. So how many people take the MCAT every year? I know there are 50,000 applicants per year (roughly).

Roughly 70,000 people take the MCAT per year (I just looked this up). So a 36 puts you among the top (.03)(70000) = 2100 applicants by MCAT score alone.

There are 25,000 seats, and he's among the top 2100 applicants by MCAT (and likely by GPA, 3.9+ from a UC school is nothing to sneeze at).
 
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txMed7

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Latro, I'm going through a similar predicament. Although you do have a higher MCAT score than I do. Some schools don't tell you anything about your application if you call, ie: Pitt, Boston, NYU, or Cornell. Some are very open about it though. You pretty much have to cold email every school that has rejected you and see if the dean is willing to go over your application. There are some that do this. Some schools aren't just interested in your secondary fee, they want to actually help you as a student. Without knowing where you applied, all I can tell you is try everyone. It does show determination and if you have to reapply, you can mention that "so and so" at "Medical school X" told me that I was weak in "y" here and so I improved on it. That holds clout.

That's really the only advise I can give you. Going by numbers you really do "deserve" a seat (I don't care what these other peope on here say). The top schools are just ridicously hard to get into these days. A dean of admissions told me that they received a 30% increase in applications in a peroid of the past two years. More applications = more kids taking the MCAT = more high scores. A lot more Ivy undergrads are moving to medicine from the typical routes and anyone who tells you prestige doesn't hold weight in this process is in denial (I guess I'm in denial right now, but not about that).
Damnit, I knew I should've gone to Cornell :laugh:.
 

nabilesmail

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The replies here are ridiculous. You don't deserve anything. Medical schools owe you nothing. You're obsessed with prestige. Schools at the top of the rankings are full of people with better stats from more higher ranked schools with really unique experiences like starting an NGO or volunteering in Africa to help AIDS victims. Do you really think that the person looking at your application thinks "Oh my, his scores are much too high for our class. We don't want any of our students to do well and be successful. Reject."?

The real question is if you showed that you understand the realities of medicine and conveyed it through your words and deeds. Even schools that don't make it to the top 20 in the US News Research Ranking fill many of their interview slots with people that are just as smart as you. But they don't want students who can only do well on standardized tests and spend countless hours in the library. They want people who can relate to others and show compassion. They're looking for people who can be leaders of the healthcare team and can work together towards a common goal. Are you one of those people?
You sound like a bitter person that didn't do as well. You have no idea what kind of person the op is other then the fact that he DOES have incredible stats. A 3.9/36 is a 76 LizzyM, pretty much on par with or higher than any medical school including the tops. I am tired of people getting pissed at other people who worked incredibly hard to be competitive for any school in the country. They DESERVE to be at a top school. Does that mean they will be? No, more people deserve to be there than can be admitted. But he is a top applicant, a 4.0 40 is not a top applicant, it's a Godly one.
 

yehhhboiii

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You guys should look up and read what the attending said.
 

mcloaf

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It is a privilege to be a physician, not a right. Nor is it a reward for being smart or getting good grades. It is a field of service. A physician's training is paid for largely by the public (even at private schools). A school's responsibility is to those who will ultimately be the recipients of care, not to the applicants.
Good point. I think this is often forgotten during the application process. Thank you for the timely reality-check. :)
 
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I want to go to a top school because of incredible quantity and quality of basic science and clinical research opportunities. Also, the fact they tend to be in large cities, which is the type of environment I see myself living my entire life. Also, I am interested in placing into a competitive speciality. Also, I am interested in academic medicine and working as a physician at a large medical center that teaches future students.

And trust me, I know what gunning is :p

The instruction at US MD med schools is rather flat. You're not going to get a better "basic science" education at the top schools. Research opps may be different, but many mid-tiers and unranked schools also have excellent research opps.

As far as the med schools being in "large cities," that may be true, but you won't be going from med school directly into private practice. And, who knows where your matched-residency will be.

As for academic medicince, are you applying to MD/PhD programs?

It's fine to apply to the reach SOMs, but what will you do if you're not accepted? What will you do if you're only accepted to lower ranked SOMs?
 

Lysilegluleu

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Somehow being deserving is derived exclusively from numbers? I understand the effort that goes into building that kinda application. I'm not discounting that, but if you think checking off boxes and getting good scores in everything will make OP a good physician, I shudder to imagine how far that one-dimensional thinking extends. When you work around doctors as much as I have, it becomes obvious why a brilliant mind and hard work are not enough. Feelings of entitlement will get you nowhere, so I hope you build a bit more depth and humility than that for your own sake and for the sake of anyone you encounter in the future. Take home message? Acceptance into this field is an honor and a privilege, not a right.

I don't know why, but today seems like it's gonna be a great daaaaaaaayyyy...
 

MedPR

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You are an excellent candidate. If the schools don't select you this cycle it is their loss ( and yours too). The whole process of Med school admission has run amuck and is out of control if students like you cannot gain entrance. In feedback they wont be even able to tell you what was wrong in your application because the whole stuff is absurd. Keep the faith and hopefully you will get in. If not next year apply to at leat 10-15 schools. Good luck and you deserve to be in.
High stats doesn't equate to deserving an acceptance.
 

Lysilegluleu

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High stats doesn't equate to deserving an acceptance.
:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup: Not sure why I always feel compelled to give long winded explanations to my views. Very well put.

I don't know why, but today seems like it's gonna be a great daaaaaaaayyyy...
 

perplexedpixel

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It’s foolish to “deserve” to be a physician strictly based on numbers, as some people have suggested. As a medical student, I have seen people with outstanding scores who have done poorly in medical school because of professionalism issues. Some people cheat, and others have extremely abrasive personalities and belittle faculty and classmates. Note: I am NOT implying that the OP is an unethical jerk, but just looking at numbers is the wrong way to think. Professionalism is becoming a huge thing in medicine.

There are so many non-quantitative factors (personal statement, letters of recommendation, perceived fit, extracurriculars, regionality) involved in a decision. Some schools are numbers-driven, but others look for something unique that sets people apart. For example, one of my classmates developed global health technology and tested it in Africa. Another one was strongly involved in children’s health advocacy organizations. Another one worked at the NIH. I think your approach is wrong. Perhaps I’m being too judgmental, but trying to dissect the application process into learning languages, working as an EMT, or starting a nonprofit organization just for the sake of a medical school application is wrong. They can tell that you’re faking your passion. Find your passion and excel at it. It seems to me that you’re very interested in research and academics. Be the best researcher that you can be. Publish papers and present posters at conferences. Medical schools don’t expect you to do everything, but they want something special – not “cookie cutter”.

Like applying to college, be sure to apply to back-up schools. I wouldn’t limit yourself to the top 10 or top 20 schools. There are plenty of non-top 20 schools that have great basic science opportunities. Either way, make sure that you’re happy where you end up. If you get rejected from your top school, maybe you can get feedback from them on why you were rejected.

Your numbers are solid, but be sure to evaluate the other non-quantitative factors. Your later application may also have played a role. Sorry if I was too preachy, but good luck!
 

PreMedOrDead

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High stats doesn't equate to deserving an acceptance.
I don't believe anyone but that one guy was trying to say that. For some reason everyone is focusing on him...
 
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Lysilegluleu

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Because it's a cancerous idea that should be squashed at every recognition. That as well as the implied sense of entitlement are notions I am almost invariably compelled to counter. I know it may have taken us quite off topic, so my apologies, OP!

I don't know why, but today seems like it's gonna be a great daaaaaaaayyyy...
 
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I want to go to a top school because of incredible quantity and quality of basic science and clinical research opportunities. Also, the fact they tend to be in large cities, which is the type of environment I see myself living my entire life. Also, I am interested in placing into a competitive speciality. Also, I am interested in academic medicine and working as a physician at a large medical center that teaches future students.

And trust me, I know what gunning is :p
Might want to reconsider your perspective. As a self-proclaimed "cookie-cutter", you might have a hard time getting accepted if you are limiting yourself only to the top schools. No matter what anyone tells you, you can certainly find plenty of quality research opportunities at almost any MD school, especially if you consider yourself a "gunner". It might be tougher, but you'll find these opportunities if you look hard enough. Whether you place into a competitive specialty is primarily up to you and not your medical school. To address your final concern, while yes it is preferred to go to a top school to do academic medicine, there are plenty of academic attendings out there that come from all types of schools (if you don't believe me, you can search physicians at academic centers and check their credentials).

If you want to increase your odds of getting into medical school, you need to apply more broadly. You will still be "the best you can be" or whatever - there is no such thing as a medical school that isn't prestigious. If you want to increase your odds of getting into a "top 20" school if you're super into the USnews report and buy into that garbage, then take 2-3 years off and work off on becoming unique. Not naive premed "unique," but actually unique - something not transparent, and something that won't just put adcoms to sleep with boredom
 

PreMedOrDead

I'm sure you'll get in...
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If you want to increase your odds of getting into a "top 20" school if you're super into the USnews report and buy into that garbage, then take 2-3 years off and work off on becoming unique. Not naive premed "unique," but actually unique - something not transparent, and something that won't just put adcoms to sleep with boredom
High-class stripper.
 

silleme

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I want to go to a top school because of incredible quantity and quality of basic science and clinical research opportunities. Also, the fact they tend to be in large cities, which is the type of environment I see myself living my entire life. Also, I am interested in placing into a competitive speciality. Also, I am interested in academic medicine and working as a physician at a large medical center that teaches future students.
Since you want to do clinical research, see if there are any more research opportunities around your school or in a lab that offer a chance to get published. This is a good opportunity to use your connections you made with your professors and see if they have any projects they know of anyone working on, or look for PhD students who need assistants in the lab, etc. Maybe look at applying to dual degree programs at the medical schools next year as those tend to be the more academic positions I would think.

As for your assertion that most research-heavy schools being in major metropolitan areas...I'd have you re-think that. I'm pretty sure Mayo is not, and I know there are others...it's a short time in your life. Look for what fits your mission, not what is says on a sheet of NIH funding stats. If you're truly interested in academic medicine, look at what schools churn out those doctors and not where they are located. If you score high enough on Step 1/2 you should be able to just about name your location for residency.
 
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Post the same thing in as many new threads as you want, you're still not going to find some "magic fix." Even people who are self-described as +/- cookie cutter get into great schools with great stats - you may just be unlucky, or you may need to rethink the entire tone of your essays and PS. If your sense of entitlement comes across there as much as it does in your posts, you can bet your app goes right in the trash in favor of someone with slightly lesser stats but at least a sense of humility.
 

txMed7

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Post the same thing in as many new threads as you want, you're still not going to find some "magic fix." Even people who are self-described as +/- cookie cutter get into great schools with great stats - you may just be unlucky, or you may need to rethink the entire tone of your essays and PS. If your sense of entitlement comes across there as much as it does in your posts, you can bet your app goes right in the trash in favor of someone with slightly lesser stats but at least a sense of humility.
He's politely asked for someone to look over his application and said that it would be "greatly appreciated."

To erroneously infer (or even worse, to outright presume) a sense of entitlement from his posts is rather presumptuous, don't you think?

He said he feels as though his stats "separate [him] from the pack a bit." Not once did he say that he deserves to go to medical school simply because of his stats. Others may have mentioned that in this thread, but not the OP.
 
Jun 5, 2012
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If you read his posts, you'll note that he repeatedly expresses such sentiments as:

"It is a competitive process, even with my stats and ECs (although I must admit, I sometimes wonder who is getting interviews/acceptances)"
and comparing himself to others with similar or "lesser" stats, as well as expressing discontent at being asked to interview at "only" 3 top-20 schools, when he thinks his stats automatically qualify him to be at a top 10 school.

it's med school, it's more than just a numbers game. like i said, there's no "magic fix" that's going to automatically get you into a bunch of top 10's, especially if you're a self-described cookie-cutter
 
OP
I

Iatro

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My final interview went pretty well, however it was at a school that I don't jump for joy over (lower UC) because I hope to enter a program that caters to students seeking hyper-competitive residencies.

At this point, I have come to terms with the idea of reapplying next cycle in a more timely manner. It pains me greatly to wade through the statistics of accepted students at top 20 schools and to see my stats are greater than almost all of them (and its not like my ECs or UG are a joke). If anyone is willing to offer advice/critique my application, I would greatly appreciate it.

What are your thoughts on such matters SDN? Say I am accepted to this school and none of the others. What do you think my course of action should be?