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Prostate Stimulator

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Hello,

My situation is as follows. I recently interviewed in TX and it went very well. I believe that I will likely be admitted pretty soon after the date that TX schools can notify out of state applicants of their acceptances (mid-October).

I have another interview invite for a different school that is closer to home. For several reasons, I believe that this school is recruiting me relatively heavily (I'm not a URM or LGBT or anything, just related to the school's vision)

This school has a good deal of money. They have given full scholarships before. I am wondering if I should delay my interview with them until after I hopefully hold an acceptance to TX. Then I was wondering if during the interview I can mention that cost is a huge factor for me and perhaps this would give them the hint that $$ could draw me in. Do you guys think I should hold off and rather mention money to them after I have an acceptance to them as well as TX school?

Thanks
 
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Prostate Stimulator

Prostate Stimulator

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For clarification, TX schools are the cheapest in the country even for OOS
 
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I would appreciate responses from people who have actually been through it, and not sycophantic premeds who spout extrapolated responses from the adcoms.
 

nverqrui

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I would appreciate responses from people who have actually been through it, and not sycophantic premeds who spout extrapolated responses from the adcoms.
This is SDN, you really shouldn't come here looking for real answers. This place is mainly for premeds to artificially inflate their own ego by talking about things they know nothing about.
 
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It isn't a job interview...
 

Flashfan

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Interviews are not the time to ask about that, not even if you are interviewing with the dean. Those decisions are made after acceptance. What good would it do to talk to someone about it if the interviewer has no decision-making authority. After you have been accepted to both schools and your financial documentation has been submitted is the time that you can try to get aid.
 
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22031 Alum

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Not a good idea, OP. Med school admissions just don't work that way.

And I've actually been through it, since that's a requirement for you to believe this (and not, y'know, common sense). I had an interviewer ask me where I had already interviewed, and then flat-out asked me if I'd been accepted with any scholarships. I had a full-tuition scholarship offer and said so. I never would have brought it up myself. And it didn't make any difference- no scholarship offer from that school (though I was accepted and got several "love notes.")
 

AlfonsTheGuru

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That would be ridiculous.
 

Mad Jack

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You'd probably have better results getting a scholarship by bringing a prostate stimulator to an interview, wielding it threateningly, staring at them all wild-eyed, and being like "come at me bro!"

You bargain for scholarships after acceptances, not before. It's as much a common sense proposition as it is one of basic etiquette.
 

sovereign0

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Sycophantic premed here. I haven't actually been in your situation, but I am a sycophantic premed who has bought a used car before, so I have advice that I think can help.

I'd wager that your medical school will want proof that you actually interviewed at the first school. It's common practice for applicants to negotiate terms of acceptance at their interview, and schools might be wary of people trying to dupe them with hollow threats. Be sure that you wield a solid threat. Speak loudly and carry a big stick. The best course of action is to bring everything from your first interview including your II (printed and framed e-mail or recording of the phone call) as well as any receipts from expenses accrued during the trip. This is your leverage. Also bring a blank check - this will be useful later.

Once you are actually in the door you need to be as threatening as possible to assert your dominance over the interviewer. Demand that you are interviewed by the Dean of the medical school, a lowly faculty member is unworthy of an applicant of your magnitude. After all, you just had a great interview at a different school and are likely to be getting accepted very soon. You need to emphasize this as much as possible. Make it known that you are better than them, you don't need them. They need you.

Be sure to begin the negotiations by demanding a full ride. When they try to whittle you down, break out the blank check and slam it on the table. Tell them, in a menacing voice, that this blank check is what the first school handed you, and remind them that they'll need to do better than that to win you over. Also, don't hesitate to show them that you are willing to walk away. This is crucial during any negotiation, just like buying a pre-owned car.

If you follow these instructions carefully, you are pretty much guaranteed a scholarship.
 

wholeheartedly

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As noted, you need leverage to negotiate something. You have none at this point.
 
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doctorleospaceman

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You have no leverage at the interview.
We're done here. They wont try to "draw you in." They don't need you, you need them. Furthermore, striding up with demands makes an acceptance unlikely, let alone any scholarship.
 
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narvik2016

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There is probably another candidate out there who they want just as much who won't be asking for money. If I was an adcom, I would accept this student instead.
 
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Goro

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I'm getting a strong whiff of one of these:



with hints of one of these:



and some essence of one of these;

 
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Sifting through the typical and maybe deserved (maybe) responses, you (the OP) actually got some solid advice. Your interest in a scholarship is reasonable. The question is when to optimally try to gently push for it, and clearly the interview is not the time. You might rephrase your inquiry to something like "how do applicants get awarded scholarship money and what are the factors in gaining such awards?"

I have struggled with the pre-med advice at times (and even had the exact words you used in my head but refrained), and I have been duly chastised. There is something there, though, that I knows rubs many the wrong way. I think in large part your (and my) reactions would be eradicated if we actually had more background on the ones giving the advice (which, yes, often does seem to play off and be reinforced by the adcoms in a teacher's pettish kind of way). I know my own visceral reactions would be tamed if I knew where these pre-meds are in the process, what they are doing now, how they determined they are equipped for the task beyond the "atta-boys" from adcoms and fellow students, whether they experience any anxiety at all about their own "chances," and maybe most importantly, how they have the time to devote to being SDN experts. Of course the best advice is probably just letting the moments of cringing go because a tidal wave of sharp and surgical criticism will be unleashed when the bear is poked (sorry for the pathetic and sloppy mixing of metaphors).
 
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I know my own visceral reactions would be tamed if I knew where these pre-meds are in the process, what they are doing now, how they determined they are equipped for the task beyond the "atta-boys" from adcoms and fellow students, whether they experience any anxiety at all about their own "chances," and maybe most importantly, how they have the time to devote to being SDN experts.
I'm sure this will get an "Oh, of course I didn't mean you" response, but this isn't the first thread I've posted in only to later see you expressing displeasure with non-sunshine/rainbows advice. So:

Where I am in the process: Applied. Interviewed. Accepted. Matriculated. Participated in the process. Applied. Interviewed. Matched. Graduated. Trained. Participated in the next level of the process. Graduated again. Now teaching residents and students who are in the place "these pre-meds" someday hope to be.

How I determined I am equipped for the task: See #1.

Whether I experience any anxiety about my own chances: See #1.

How I have time to devote to SDN: See #1. Attending life is busy, but the amount of "free" time is astronomical compared to training. I choose to spend some of it (actually a fairly small amount!) trying to drop knowledge-- even when that knowledge isn't what people want to hear.
 

UNMedGa

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Sycophantic premed here. I haven't actually been in your situation, but I am a sycophantic premed who has bought a used car before, so I have advice that I think can help.

I'd wager that your medical school will want proof that you actually interviewed at the first school. It's common practice for applicants to negotiate terms of acceptance at their interview, and schools might be wary of people trying to dupe them with hollow threats. Be sure that you wield a solid threat. Speak loudly and carry a big stick. The best course of action is to bring everything from your first interview including your II (printed and framed e-mail or recording of the phone call) as well as any receipts from expenses accrued during the trip. This is your leverage. Also bring a blank check - this will be useful later.

Once you are actually in the door you need to be as threatening as possible to assert your dominance over the interviewer. Demand that you are interviewed by the Dean of the medical school, a lowly faculty member is unworthy of an applicant of your magnitude. After all, you just had a great interview at a different school and are likely to be getting accepted very soon. You need to emphasize this as much as possible. Make it known that you are better than them, you don't need them. They need you.

Be sure to begin the negotiations by demanding a full ride. When they try to whittle you down, break out the blank check and slam it on the table. Tell them, in a menacing voice, that this blank check is what the first school handed you, and remind them that they'll need to do better than that to win you over. Also, don't hesitate to show them that you are willing to walk away. This is crucial during any negotiation, just like buying a pre-owned car.

If you follow these instructions carefully, you are pretty much guaranteed a scholarship.
Man I wish I had the creativity to write this kind of post. Well done. :laugh:

OP, you can't really negotiate for scholarships during the interview. You need to get accepted before there's any talk of scholarships.
 

DrMedix

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I have struggled with the pre-med advice at times (and even had the exact words you used in my head but refrained), and I have been duly chastised. There is something there, though, that I knows rubs many the wrong way. I think in large part your (and my) reactions would be eradicated if we actually had more background on the ones giving the advice (which, yes, often does seem to play off and be reinforced by the adcoms in a teacher's pettish kind of way). I know my own visceral reactions would be tamed if I knew where these pre-meds are in the process, what they are doing now, how they determined they are equipped for the task beyond the "atta-boys" from adcoms and fellow students, whether they experience any anxiety at all about their own "chances," and maybe most importantly, how they have the time to devote to being SDN experts. Of course the best advice is probably just letting the moments of cringing go because a tidal wave of sharp and surgical criticism will be unleashed when the bear is poked (sorry for the pathetic and sloppy mixing of metaphors).
I'm sorry, I really try not to post too often on here and read some interesting stuff all the time, but I have seen you everywhere--and you sir are an absolute piece of work.


Are you incapable of looking past the fact that pre-meds might have brains and be capable of giving advice? Seriously dude, get over yourself. Every. single. one. of. your. posts. is some whiney "I'm so morally superior" assertion of competence.
If this bothers you so much, why don't you grab your account, computer, and head, and shove it up where the sun don't shine? I seriously hope this account is a result of some multiple personality disorder because man, if you're this insufferable in real life good luck ever finding someone to be your friend.

You have a problem with people spending some time on SDN reading+posting about a career and field that they're interested in pursuing? Not nearly as disturbing as your need to repeatedly exhibit that worthless sense of self-righteousness through the degradation of pre-med members.
As for your need for credentials and background behind an anonymous internet forum: let's see some real credentials from you, you toolbox d'bag. As far as any of us know you're just some lonely pre-med at Roadside Community College who spends all his time reading Nietzsche and jacking off.

Yeah, I'm not an adcom, and yeah, I'm not done medical school but if you really want to compare dick sizes I'll bet my diplomas kick any ****ty podunk qualifications that you have out of the water, you asinine piece of human garbage.
GTFO before you realize you're never going to cut it as a human being in the long process called life.

Before you type out some highbrow reply espousing your unique ability to be a dick online, do everyone a favor and go get laid or something.

Mods: Ban me if you must.
 
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nverqrui

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I'm sorry, I really try not to post too often on here and read some interesting stuff all the time, but I have seen you everywhere--and you sir are an absolute piece of work.


Are you incapable of looking past the fact that pre-meds might have brains and be capable of giving advice? Seriously dude, get over yourself. Every. single. one. of. your. posts. is some whiney "I'm so morally superior" assertion of competence.
If this bothers you so much, why don't you grab your account, computer, and head, and shove it up where the sun don't shine? I seriously hope this account is a result of some multiple personality disorder because man, if you're this insufferable in real life good luck ever finding someone to be your friend.

You have a problem with people spending some time on SDN reading+posting about a career and field that they're interested in pursuing? Not nearly as disturbing as your need to repeatedly exhibit that worthless sense of self-righteousness through the degradation of pre-med members.
As for your need for credentials and background behind an anonymous internet forum: let's see some real credentials from you, you toolbox d'bag. As far as any of us know you're just some lonely pre-med at Roadside Community College who spends all his time reading Nietzsche and jacking off.

Yeah, I'm not an adcom, and yeah, I'm not done medical school but if you really want to compare dick sizes I'll bet my diplomas kick any ****ty podunk qualifications that you have out of the water, you asinine piece of human garbage.
GTFO before you realize you're never going to cut it as a human being in the long process called life.

Before you type out some highbrow reply espousing your unique ability to be a dick online, do everyone a favor and go get laid or something.

Mods: Ban me if you must.
O__O Is anyone else kinda scared right now? Somebody please hold me :nailbiting:

But in all seriousness, I think it's funny how bipolar SDN can be at times. At times, most of the members here seem ecstatic to point out the fact that someone is a potential troll. At other times, posts like this say that any random poster can give good advice. MAKE UP YOUR MIND ALREADY!!!11211

As a side note, what does getting laid have to do with being a good human being?:shrug:
 

SouthernSurgeon

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I'm sure this will get an "Oh, of course I didn't mean you" response, but this isn't the first thread I've posted in only to later see you expressing displeasure with non-sunshine/rainbows advice. So:

Where I am in the process: Applied. Interviewed. Accepted. Matriculated. Participated in the process. Applied. Interviewed. Matched. Graduated. Trained. Participated in the next level of the process. Graduated again. Now teaching residents and students who are in the place "these pre-meds" someday hope to be.

How I determined I am equipped for the task: See #1.

Whether I experience any anxiety about my own chances: See #1.

How I have time to devote to SDN: See #1. Attending life is busy, but the amount of "free" time is astronomical compared to training. I choose to spend some of it (actually a fairly small amount!) trying to drop knowledge-- even when that knowledge isn't what people want to hear.
The thing I like about SDN is that largely advice gets to stand on the quality of the advice, not the qualifications of the person giving it. People aren't shy on the inter webs so everyone calls out bad advice for what it is pretty quickly.

While it's certainly nice to have input from people who've been through it and there are times when their unique perspective is valuable, in 99% of threads the advice being given by pre-meds who've simply bothered to do some basic research is more than adequate. It's not uncommon to see a thread where someone has gotten good advice but the OP will bat-signal the adcom members asking specifically for their input, only for the adcom to come in and say "yup that all sounds about right"
 
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The thing I like about SDN is that largely advice gets to stand on the quality of the advice, not the qualifications of the person giving it.
You can't be serious. An ADCOM on here could literally make a post about the necessity of ritual sacrifice in the application process and it would get 10 pages of support; not to mention a nationwide streak of animal disappearances. I'm not even saying they give bad advice, but what forum are you posting on wherein this is true?
 

steelersfan1243

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You can't be serious. An ADCOM on here could literally make a post about the necessity of ritual sacrifice in the application process and it would get 10 pages of support; not to mention a nationwide streak of animal disappearances. I'm not even saying they give bad advice, but what forum are you posting on wherein this is true?
Can an ADCOM please go do this in the WAMC forum and report back with their results?
 
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SouthernSurgeon

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You can't be serious. An ADCOM on here could literally make a post about the necessity of ritual sacrifice in the application process and it would get 10 pages of support; not to mention a nationwide streak of animal disappearances. I'm not even saying they give bad advice, but what forum are you posting on wherein this is true?
I said "largely" ;)
 
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You can't be serious. An ADCOM on here could literally make a post about the necessity of ritual sacrifice...
I think there's a little confounding at work here. It may seem to you that anything adcoms post gets stupid amounts of support. Your "example" implies that it's simply their status that makes that happen. Now any online forum will have bandwagoning, but could it possibly be the fact that the adcom's experience makes the things they post more likely to be correct, and therefore worthy of support?
 

NickNaylor

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I'm sure this will get an "Oh, of course I didn't mean you" response, but this isn't the first thread I've posted in only to later see you expressing displeasure with non-sunshine/rainbows advice. So:

Where I am in the process: Applied. Interviewed. Accepted. Matriculated. Participated in the process. Applied. Interviewed. Matched. Graduated. Trained. Participated in the next level of the process. Graduated again. Now teaching residents and students who are in the place "these pre-meds" someday hope to be.

How I determined I am equipped for the task: See #1.

Whether I experience any anxiety about my own chances: See #1.

How I have time to devote to SDN: See #1. Attending life is busy, but the amount of "free" time is astronomical compared to training. I choose to spend some of it (actually a fairly small amount!) trying to drop knowledge-- even when that knowledge isn't what people want to hear.
I always get amused when people call out attendings/residents for "not having time" to post on SDN. It's not that much of a time commitment. I have my three forums I browse (pre-med, allopathic, specialty-specific forum), do a quick check on the school-specific thread of my medical school, and that's it.

Granted, I participate in a minimal number of threads in pre-allopathic because so much of them are garbage, but you can easily get your SDN browsing done in 10-15 minutes. I usually spend about 10 minutes in the morning when I wake up and 10 minutes in the evening after I get home. I'll browse more if I have free time.
 
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I always get amused when people call out attendings/residents for "not having time" to post on SDN. It's not that much of a time commitment. I have my three forums I browse (pre-med, allopathic, specialty-specific forum), do a quick check on the school-specific thread of my medical school, and that's it.

Granted, I participate in a minimal number of threads in pre-allopathic because so much of them are garbage, but you can easily get your SDN browsing done in 10-15 minutes. I usually spend about 10 minutes in the morning when I wake up and 10 minutes in the evening after I get home. I'll browse more if I have free time.
Except no one called out attendings/residents.
 
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@DrMedix, impressive rant. I got schooled...and by a rising college senior, no less.

I see you chose investment banking. Your wealth-creation differential showed savvy well beyond your years.

Also love a HYPSM man cracking on "Roadside Community College." Telling.

Finally, I don't believe there have been complaints about the content or accuracy of posts from pre-med advisors. It's the arrogance, silly. Sort of what the OP in this thread got bashed for, but apparently there is good arrogance and bad arrogance.
 

DrMedix

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@DrMedix, impressive rant. I got schooled...and by a rising college senior, no less.

I see you chose investment banking. Your wealth-creation differential showed savvy well beyond your years.

Also love a HYPSM man cracking on "Roadside Community College." Telling.

Finally, I don't believe there have been complaints about the content or accuracy of posts from pre-med advisors. It's the arrogance, silly. Sort of what the OP in this thread got bashed for, but apparently there is good arrogance and bad arrogance.
Ive actually decided to take up my ISMMS Flexmed spot, and have submitted my AMCAS to do so.

If you think I was bashing on CCs then you missed the entire point and are just in denial about your lack of a real personality.

Until you show some real credentials like a couple badges or something, myself and every other student you insult will just assume that you're in high school.

Good day and best of luck finding a date to prom.
 
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