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joti

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I would like the experts in this panel to reply.

What are the strategies to accelerate the process of publications in Cardiology journals?
Many articles take 8-12 months from drafting-submission-acceptance-publication.
 

BlueJayBill

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from submission, 8 to 12 months seems on the long side... most investigators i know usually can get it within 2-6 months. naturally the rate of publications more so depends on the quality of the work and the journal you submit to..

the more prestigious the journal the more demanding they are in terms of impact of the work, orginality, mechanism, etc. some people get bogged down in terms of running additional experiments for months after the revisions come back.. i think sometimes it's easier to withdraw from one journal and submit to a lesser one depending on what they ask for.

hope this helps,

Bill
 

TransFatsRgood

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My experience is that in 8-12 months is flying for a publication acceptance. I had three first-author publications last year and the fastest one from submission to publication (when it should up on PubMed, as an in-press article) was just over 8 months and this was accepted at the first journal submitted. My two others took between 12-18 months.

On the other end of the spectrum, I have a research study that was rejected at 5 journals and I am in the process of submitting it to MSSE. This study is going on 12+ months of submission. The study itself was conducted in 2005.

The previous post stated 2-4 months, however, this is not feasible for a resident because, what you are doing is not a ground-breaking, multicenter, multinational, major clinical trial with funding that covers people who do the writing, editing and submission for you.

Strategies to accelarate the process include, adding a big name to the paper as an author and submitting it to the journal that he or she is an editor of. Second, simple non obtrusive inquiry to the editors and editorial staff. Third suggestion of peer reviewers that are really going to do this for you (however, this is dangerous because it crosses into people that know you and may pose conflicts of interest into the review) Next, many journals post stats on how fast they are to decision on submissions. and Finally, there are these questionable journals that if you pay a priority processing fee, they promise to have either an acceptance/rejection decision within 2-4 weeks.
 
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joti

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My experience is that in 8-12 months is flying for a publication acceptance. I had three first-author publications last year and the fastest one from submission to publication (when it should up on PubMed, as an in-press article) was just over 8 months and this was accepted at the first journal submitted. My two others took between 12-18 months.

On the other end of the spectrum, I have a research study that was rejected at 5 journals and I am in the process of submitting it to MSSE. This study is going on 12+ months of submission. The study itself was conducted in 2005.

The previous post stated 2-4 months, however, this is not feasible for a resident because, what you are doing is not a ground-breaking, multicenter, multinational, major clinical trial with funding that covers people who do the writing, editing and submission for you.

Strategies to accelarate the process include, adding a big name to the paper as an author and submitting it to the journal that he or she is an editor of. Second, simple non obtrusive inquiry to the editors and editorial staff. Third suggestion of peer reviewers that are really going to do this for you (however, this is dangerous because it crosses into people that know you and may pose conflicts of interest into the review) Next, many journals post stats on how fast they are to decision on submissions. and Finally, there are these questionable journals that if you pay a priority processing fee, they promise to have either an acceptance/rejection decision within 2-4 weeks.

First of all congrats for 3 first authored pubs as a resident. That is pretty impressive. Thank you very much for the advice.

Is there any body does professional editing? How long it takes? How much is the cost? One of the experienced guys told me we can email the editors and pressurize to let us know the rejection/acceptance status. Is this true?

Anyway I am starting the process pretty soon with the hope of having few publs before next fellowship application?
Hey trans fat good Good luck for your interview.
 

joti

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from submission, 8 to 12 months seems on the long side... most investigators i know usually can get it within 2-6 months. naturally the rate of publications more so depends on the quality of the work and the journal you submit to..

the more prestigious the journal the more demanding they are in terms of impact of the work, orginality, mechanism, etc. some people get bogged down in terms of running additional experiments for months after the revisions come back.. i think sometimes it's easier to withdraw from one journal and submit to a lesser one depending on what they ask for.

hope this helps,

Bill


It took almost almost 6 months for my case report to get published. I suppose original research studies will be more than that.

Thanks for the input
 

TransFatsRgood

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Not sure about the professional editing part or where to go for this. But I think it probably would be best to do the process yourself, it is invaluable experience.

As for pressuring the editors, I found the only that really sped this up was suggestion of peer reviewers (which can be tedious and difficult not really knowing any colleagues that don't have conflicts of interest that would jump on doing this)

Oh yea, I would also suggest going to a few journal websites and signing up to become a peer reviewer for them. It doesn't pay off in the beginning but after doing this for 2 years, I finally have become pretty close to the editorial staff of a prominent medical journal. Plus it is invaluable experience in how to submit a very polished manuscript when it comes time. Third, I list each "peer review" I have completed in a section on my CV.

Send me an email directly, I have some ideas for you and I can show you more of what I have done.

[email protected]
 
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