How vital is understanding pathological mechanisms for MCAT? Can it provide an edge??

Socal_emt

ChowderPA-S
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I have been reviewing the major mechanisms involved in diabetes, pancreatitis, blood clotting, and all the other major disease pathology in the body. For all who have taken the MCAT, would this had helped your performance?

- I am planning on taking my MCAT the summer of 2017. So time is not a big contributing factor. I have been studying for the MCAT since mid March 2016. My time has been spent finishing my undergrad and working full time.
 

theonlytycrane

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How in depth are you talking?

In Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder results in the b-cells of the pancreas failing to make insulin. In Type 2, insulin receptors become unreceptive to insulin and b-cells can get tired of trying to make more insulin after awhile. Which type would be mediated with exogenous insulin injections?

Blood clots are important to prevent us from bleeding out, but can also be dangerous if unintended. Various clotting proteins, molecules, and vitamins (vitamin K) play a role in clotting. If some blood vessel is restricted in diameter, how will the blood flow be changed downstream from the clot?

That's about as detailed as you should be thinking about these things and most of that will be in the passage for reference. Any more details in terms of a mechanism will be lower yield. More details in terms of an experiment may be in a passage, but that's not really something we can prepare for until we encounter it.
 
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Aug 22, 2016
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I find knowing minutiae about illnesses helped me understand the underlying logic of physiology, and therefore, helped me answer questions.
 
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Socal_emt

Socal_emt

ChowderPA-S
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I have noticed on some passages that since I better understood the mechanism of action behind the question, or have actually seen a VERY similar study before in the past, that I didn't even have to read the passage at all.

I know it seems low yield, but I have a solid foundation in all the high yield questions so far. It would seem best now to focus even on the low yield right?
 

Hospitalized

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Make sure you know T1/T2 diabetes. These frequently show up in the bio section and psych/soc section (remember psych/soc is 25% biology based).
 
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Jan 20, 2016
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Well first off, psych/soc is 5 percent biology not 25. Second, there are very few illnesses that you specifically need to know for the mcat, and most of this knowledge is very basic. Third, studying for a year and a half for the mcat might be the most overkill thing I have ever heard. Regardless, good luck in a year
 
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