HS student needs help to make a pathway to become a PT!!!!

Discussion in 'Pre-Physical Therapy' started by Messi2199, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. Messi2199

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, I'm a sophomore in HS and need some advice to create steps to become a PT

    1.) what classes should I take in HS to create a better chance to get into good colleges?

    2.) what can I do outside of school to gain experience?

    3.) are there different types of PT's

    4.) is there any scholarships I should look for?


    5.) I really want to get into northeastern, can I do anything to get a better chance of getting accepted?

    6.) any advice you can give me to create a pathway to get a successful career is really appreciate!!! Can you guys can give me like a guideline/ outline of things I can and should do
     
    #1 Messi2199, Aug 4, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
  2. OP
    OP
    Messi2199

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can anyone please help?? Any answer is appreciated!!
     
  3. twsurfsnow

    twsurfsnow B.A. Biology, MPH
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    22
    Status:
    Physical Therapy Student
    Dual enrollment or AP sciences is the best bet, however , even the PTCAS application says do not include high school extra curriculum.


    Posted using SDN Mobile
     
    Messi2199 likes this.
  4. NMSK89

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2013
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status:
    Physical Therapy Student
    I'm starting the graduate phase of Northeastern's DPT program in Jan, so I could answer questions about applying with a BS. I am assuming though, that you are interested in the freshman entry which I'm not too familiar with. The best advice I think would be to take core science and math classes that will prepare you for the college level a&p, bio, chem, and physics that you will take in the undergrad portion while keeping your GPA 3.7+. If you want to pm me with some specific questions I'll do my best to help you out later today when I'm out of work.
     
    #4 NMSK89, Aug 5, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
    Messi2199 likes this.
  5. southernswimmer

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    44
    1.) Take the most advanced-level classes you can handle. Honors/AP for sure.

    2.) Try doing a bit of shadowing. Some places limit the number of hours HS students can observe though.

    3.) I'm sure you're able to do your own research one this. The Interweb is a wonderful place.

    4.) Specifically for PT? The only ones I've found are for minorities/people from underprivileged homes. Most are handled by the schools themselves. For outside scholarships fastweb.com is the best source.

    5.) The only thing I know about Northeastern is that it's in Boston. Heh :). Do your research on their freshmen entry program and don't be afraid to contact them with questions.

    6.) My advice? Enjoy high school! College is HARD. PT school is HARDER. You're WAY ahead of the ballgame here; I hadn't even discovered PT when I was a sophomore in HS :p. Do things that you enjoy and don't just do them because they "look good on paper." Do well in school, have fun in your ECs, do research on/shadow some PT, and enjoy your free rent and home cooked meals ;).
     
    Messi2199 likes this.
  6. a7rcana

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    43
    Status:
    Physical Therapy Student
    You're going to have to complete a 4 year undergraduate degree before you can matriculate into PT school. So that gives you 2 years left of high school, 4 years of college to get through. Don't get ahead of yourself. Focus on getting good grades in AP science classes like biology, chemistry, and physics as a high school student.

    Find an undergraduate program and degree you would be interested in - there is no pre-PT degree. You will have to major in something and most people on this forum recommend against majoring in exercise science as you would not be able to do much with that degree if you don't get in to PT school or don't end up wanting to be a PT. In order to find the best fit for you, you will need to do your own research. Does your high school have college advisors? Make sure as a junior you get a meeting with a college advisor to help you select the best fit - they will be able to tell you about available scholarships as well. PT school is a lot of money and time, I would definitely consider the additional cost of undergrad before choosing a college. Do you want to be applying to PT school already with student loans on your back?

    When you do attend college focus on excelling in your science and pre-req courses. I finished my pre-reqs (after getting my college degree in art) in about a year and a half worth of semesters. You don't have to only take science courses. Be a well-rounded person and take classes you enjoy and develop other aspects of your personality. Maybe try a course in education, music, poetry, philosophy, art. Perhaps you want to be in the athletic training program and help the college athletes. There are many options available, but don't get too obsessed and one-track minded with PT. Do other things with your time: find research assistant opportunities, try intramural sports, be a part of a club or two, volunteer with underprivileged kids, develop real relationships with a couple of professors who will be able to give you great recommendations.

    You have a long way to go before attending PT school. Set yourself up with good grades in your pre-reqs so that you can apply if you end up wanting to do so, but things could very well change for you in 6 years and you don't want to end up a 1 dimensional person who has only thought about a career in PT his/her whole life. You're still developing as a person. Be responsible and take action - don't look to your parents, teachers, etc to do the work for you. Research the program you want to get into (northwestern?) and create a step-by-step plan of what you will need to complete to get there. Good luck.
     
    Messi2199 likes this.
  7. Watson27

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    167
    Status:
    Pre-Physical Therapy
    If you are truly interested in PT, look into high school admissions programs. Some schools offer a "3+3" degree, or guaranteed admittance to their DPT program as long as you keep your grades up in undergrad. I know PTs and friends who did these programs, and they only have positive things to say. If you are sure, then there's no reason not to.

    However, my main advice is to talk to your guidance counselor at school. It is their job to answer these same questions all day long. And I am sure the quality of answers from them is much better than those of internet strangers!

    Good luck with whatever you choose! :)
     
    Messi2199 likes this.
  8. NMSK89

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2013
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status:
    Physical Therapy Student
    Messi2199 and Watson27 like this.
  9. NMSK89

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2013
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status:
    Physical Therapy Student
    Now that I'm home I'll try to answer some of your questions.

    1. See above, whatever you do keep your GPA above 3.7 and shoot for an 1800+ SAT, 30+ ACT, with 45k applicants, Northeastern is extremely competitive, especially the DPT program.

    2. Participate in athletics, hobbies, and other interests outside of academics

    3. The APTA website has a lot of good info, start here;
    http://www.apta.org/PTCareers/Overview/

    4. Not too sure what's available for undergrad, do check this out;
    http://www.northeastern.edu/bouve/pt/add/pollyscholarship.html

    5. If you haven't already, shadow a PT, take the time to see what a day in their shoes is like to make sure this is something you really want to pursue. If you decide that it is, don't rush the process, yes it's long and arduous but if you really love science and PT, it is enjoyable. Your life will likely never again be as laid back as it is in high school so remember to live in the moment. If you spend all of your time stressing over becoming a PT you will likely get there, but at the cost of missing out on some of the best years of your life.
     
    #9 NMSK89, Aug 5, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
    Messi2199 likes this.
  10. OP
    OP
    Messi2199

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks to everyone that replied, you all gave me great advice. Also, I know I am young but I just wanna be ahead and don't worry I am enjoying life in high school before I grow up!! And if anyone could explain the 3+3 program that would be helpful
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Messi2199

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    To the link you attached is this the 3+3 program? And also in reference to the link, do I have to get my undergrad before I do this program or no? I'm not sure how to phrase the question I asked so sorry if you don't understand
     
  12. NMSK89

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2013
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status:
    Physical Therapy Student
    If you look through the programs tab to the left you will see that Northeastern has two options for the DPT, the entry-level and post baccalaureate DPT.

    For the entry-level you are admitted to the physical therapy program straight out of high school and would do 3 years of undergrad work followed by a 3 year graduate phase.

    The post bacc program is for those who are applying with a traditional 4 year degree.

    As you can see, there are two different routes you can take. If you are 100% certain PT is for you, the freshman entry is ideal as it saves you a year, and takes away the uncertainty of having to apply to PT school later on. Be warned though, the undergrad portion is rigorous and if you don't maintain the required GPA for the graduate phase you won't have much to fall back on.

    The post bacc program is ideal for someone who may not have been aware of PT in high school and/or wanted a degree to fall back on in case PT didn't work out. In the end, both paths lead to the DPT so do your research and take the time to decide what's best for you.
     
    #12 NMSK89, Aug 6, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2014
  13. OHIO PT

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    15
    Status:
    DPT / OTD
    I know this is an old thread but yes, this.

    If you are in high school and truly want to be a PT then pick a school that has a 3+3 program. Its crazy to even think of not doing that if you really want to be a PT.

    I went to one of these schools. Admitted right from high school, never had to reapply, or take the GRE, or stress about getting only A's in my science course etc. Just needed to keep the miniumum GPA and started PT school my senior year in college. Saved a year of school and a year of tuition. I applied to three of these schools out of high school and got into two of them.

    I only had probably a 3.0 or 3.2 HS GPA. I did got to a pretty well respected Jesuit High School in the Midwest and to a Jesuit University for college, so they knew my school was difficult. I never took one AP class. But I did take all the science courses (had to per school anyway), Physics, Bio, Chem, Anatomy, etc.

    It is so much easier to get in right out of high school then trying to in college. You are ahead of the game and competing with far less people as most don't know they want to do PT right out of high school.
     

Share This Page