Falconclaw

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It's a little crazy that I can write a thread title like that after only two days in med school, but that's just how I feel. Orientation was a blast, and I really like my classmates and I've made some great friends here. Our first class is anatomy. I actually more or less enjoy dissecting cadavers and find learning about the various parts interesting during the lab, but I'm already starting to feel like I'm falling behind and people know their stuff a lot better than I do. I was really nervous before starting med school because I've long known that I'm the "intelligent but lazy" type and med school is all about memorization. But I guess I'm really awful at making decisions, I had already changed my mind in regards to my career too many times, and parental pressure led me to going down this path anyway. I always found humanities stuff more interesting than science but I picked medicine over law because healing people is a lot more compelling than me than boring document review all day.

I'm just bad at studying. I guess it's something that I can get better at, but it's hard. It's crazy that I got this far with my bad study habits. I did only get into one MD school, albeit a relatively strong one. But it's really hard for me to just sit down and memorize where everything in the body is.

In terms of other career options, I really don't know what else I would do. If I didn't get into med school this past cycle I probably would've applied to law school. That material seems more up my alley but obviously requires a lot of studying too. I feel like I'd rather just go get a job and start working rather than study, but I don't really have a great plan B. It's literally only been two days (right now we're just doing anatomy for two weeks) so I obviously haven't failed anything yet so maybe this panic is premature, but you guys can let me know.
 

joker2400

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If you truly want out, now is the time. Having said that had similar feelings early in anatomy and I was similarly bad at studying and my early preclinical grades reflect that, but it is a learning process. You have to not only learn the new material, but learn how to learn it as well. It's unlikely that if you work hard and make the adjustments needed you won't be successful.
 

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Also lucky for you is the fact that the bits of medicine where humanistic reasoning is more prevalent and valued also tend to be waaaaay less competitive, so if you are trying to go that way, you do not need to be nearly as pressed about aceing every exam. You are simply playing a different game if you are not trying to be a surgical subspecialist.
 
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Anatomy rewards those who put in the time studying every day - both inside and outside the lab. It is also prudent to find people who you can effectively group study with. That's my view on it as an M1 who took my first anatomy exam 2 days ago.
 

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Don't sweat it I think everyone has that feeling of inadequacy early on in medical school. Put in as much work as you can handle and in a couple exams you're going to see that regardless of people with Post-baccs, phds, and people with masters degrees, the playing field will be even. Even those that have seen information before wont remember any of the details necessary for success on a typical exam.
 

DocWinter

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Give it a semester. If you can pass and still have the stones to continue, go for it. If you're still feeling this way, cut and walk. Most everyone is walking around feeling like a bad student or struggling in some way.
1st semester was the toughest for myself and most of my classmates. Nothing afterwards is easier, but you just know what to expect and how to study better.
 

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You'll find a study method that works for you.
 
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Also, don't gauge your level of understanding based on what your peers are saying. I find that the people who tend to talk the loudest have no clue what they're talking about and are oblivious to the fact.
 
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Falconclaw

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Thanks for the encouragement guys, I've calmed down and am just gonna try patiently studying and see where that gets me. Everyone says that doing old exams is helpful and we have a day off on Monday to study for the rest on Tuesday so hopefully I'll be able to do okay. Sometimes I just have these existential crises. I'm sure I'll have plenty more as things go forward but it's definitely too early to quit now.
It's just hard at first to learn how to learn - in undergrad it was always very clear what we had to read, while this is more, "you have all these resources in your Dropbox, do what you like with them." Hell, in anatomy today, we had electric bone saws at our disposal to cut through the rib cage, and we didn't even get a warning from anyone about how to use them or to be careful! Hopefully I'll just be able to adjust to this very different learning environment. And besides I don't really have any great fall back career options right now, I don't want to go to law school just cuz I thought med school was too hard lol.
I guess the thing is I knew it'd be hard, I just didn't know that I'd be feeling lost and behind on day two!
 
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It's a little crazy that I can write a thread title like that after only two days in med school, but that's just how I feel. Orientation was a blast, and I really like my classmates and I've made some great friends here. Our first class is anatomy. I actually more or less enjoy dissecting cadavers and find learning about the various parts interesting during the lab, but I'm already starting to feel like I'm falling behind and people know their stuff a lot better than I do. I was really nervous before starting med school because I've long known that I'm the "intelligent but lazy" type and med school is all about memorization. But I guess I'm really awful at making decisions, I had already changed my mind in regards to my career too many times, and parental pressure led me to going down this path anyway. I always found humanities stuff more interesting than science but I picked medicine over law because healing people is a lot more compelling than me than boring document review all day.

I'm just bad at studying. I guess it's something that I can get better at, but it's hard. It's crazy that I got this far with my bad study habits. I did only get into one MD school, albeit a relatively strong one. But it's really hard for me to just sit down and memorize where everything in the body is.

In terms of other career options, I really don't know what else I would do. If I didn't get into med school this past cycle I probably would've applied to law school. That material seems more up my alley but obviously requires a lot of studying too. I feel like I'd rather just go get a job and start working rather than study, but I don't really have a great plan B. It's literally only been two days (right now we're just doing anatomy for two weeks) so I obviously haven't failed anything yet so maybe this panic is premature, but you guys can let me know.
I don't wanna persuade you in any direction because you might just be stressed from encountering the workload for the first time. But I know a guy who dropped out after his first year, went back to do the necessary pre-reqs and applied to law school. He's in law now and he loves what he's doing, pretty sure he's making a lot of money too. You can succeed in medical school if you made it past admission, but it's more important to pursue something you love and are interested in.

Then again, I know people who were unsure about medicine, started med school and ended up loving it. I'd give it a year.
 
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Falconclaw

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I don't wanna persuade you in any direction because you might just be stressed from encountering the workload for the first time. But I know a guy who dropped out after his first year, went back to do the necessary pre-reqs and applied to law school. He's in law now and he loves what he's doing, pretty sure he's making a lot of money too. You can succeed in medical school if you made it past admission, but it's more important to pursue something you love and are interested in.

Then again, I know people who were unsure about medicine, started med school and ended up loving it. I'd give it a year.
Haha I don't think law school has pre reqs but I know what you mean. Yeah I'll see how it goes.
 

operaman

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The reality is that what you do in the first 2 years is very unlike what the practice of medicine really is. I would imagine the world of law school is similarly divorced from reality in the first year -- you simply have to learn the language of any profession before you can start learning to practice it. If the primary reason you're having second thoughts is that you feel like you're behind and not at the level of your peers, then I would tell you to give it time.

Your perception that your peers know more than you is seriously misguided and for good reason. The reality is that we all study different material at different times. Even if you have a subject-based curriculum, everyone in the class will be studying something slightly different each day. Maybe you were just reviewing muscle origin/insertion for the back and chest while the loudmouth dude was just studying nerves and vasculature which you had only glanced at briefly and were planning to study more in depth that night. If the people showing off their knowledge studied something different right before lab, you'll feel like you're behind when the truth is you just haven't spent time on that particular topic yet. If you started rattling off factoids from what you had just looked at, chances are they would be similarly lost. All that matters is the exam; so long as you learn all the material by then, you'll be fine.

Beware of any class mythology that develops. These are typically the stories about savants who never go to class and never study until the day before the exam and still manage to ace it. Complete and utter horses--t. Of all the people I heard this about in my own class, none of them ended up AOA or turning out incredible step 1 scores. I'm sure they did fine, but my guess is that stories about them got seriously overblown. The lesson is to ignore everyone else and focus on what you need to do. It really doesn't matter how much studying it takes someone else. If they can ace tests with only two hours of study, well whoopty freakin do for them. Just do what you need to do.
 
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It's a little crazy that I can write a thread title like that after only two days in med school, but that's just how I feel. Orientation was a blast, and I really like my classmates and I've made some great friends here. Our first class is anatomy. I actually more or less enjoy dissecting cadavers and find learning about the various parts interesting during the lab, but I'm already starting to feel like I'm falling behind and people know their stuff a lot better than I do. I was really nervous before starting med school because I've long known that I'm the "intelligent but lazy" type and med school is all about memorization. But I guess I'm really awful at making decisions, I had already changed my mind in regards to my career too many times, and parental pressure led me to going down this path anyway. I always found humanities stuff more interesting than science but I picked medicine over law because healing people is a lot more compelling than me than boring document review all day.

I'm just bad at studying. I guess it's something that I can get better at, but it's hard. It's crazy that I got this far with my bad study habits. I did only get into one MD school, albeit a relatively strong one. But it's really hard for me to just sit down and memorize where everything in the body is.

In terms of other career options, I really don't know what else I would do. If I didn't get into med school this past cycle I probably would've applied to law school. That material seems more up my alley but obviously requires a lot of studying too. I feel like I'd rather just go get a job and start working rather than study, but I don't really have a great plan B. It's literally only been two days (right now we're just doing anatomy for two weeks) so I obviously haven't failed anything yet so maybe this panic is premature, but you guys can let me know.
I am at an Osteopathic school and would easily trade places with you, getting into one MD school is a huge accomplishment, and you got to study like crazy just to pass in medical school. Med school is not like undergrad where you study a little bit to pass. You will get used to workload eventually.

Think of it like a workout for your mind, when you start lifting weights, its hard on your body initially and its painful and tiring but eventually you get used to it, you will eventually get used to medical school.

Also Law school is not worth it because there are no jobs for lawyers these days, the economy contrary to what you read on the news is not recovering and hence no jobs for lawyers, even people coming out of the good law schools are struggling to find jobs, at least medical school grads are finding work.
 
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Falconclaw

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Thanks for the encouragement guys, I've been feeling better. I just have to get used to the huge cultural difference - in undergrad, you studied when you had some free time unless it was the day before the test. Here it's the opposite - your default activity is studying, and you have to find a way to squeeze other stuff in. I was also spending a little too much panicking rather than just sitting down and learning the material, which as everyone says is not terribly conceptually difficult, the way say Gauss's Law in physics was, but just very voluminous.

Also what's great here is that even though our grading system is Honors/Pass/Fail, people are super collaborative and willing to share their knowledge and resources. I went to the anatomy lab tonight and one guy who knew the heart particularly well was walking us through all the relevant arteries in it, it was great.
 

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Thanks for the encouragement guys, I've been feeling better. I just have to get used to the huge cultural difference - in undergrad, you studied when you had some free time unless it was the day before the test. Here it's the opposite - your default activity is studying, and you have to find a way to squeeze other stuff in. I was also spending a little too much panicking rather than just sitting down and learning the material, which as everyone says is not terribly conceptually difficult, the way say Gauss's Law in physics was, but just very voluminous.

Also what's great here is that even though our grading system is Honors/Pass/Fail, people are super collaborative and willing to share their knowledge and resources. I went to the anatomy lab tonight and one guy who knew the heart particularly well was walking us through all the relevant arteries in it, it was great.
This one helped me in anatomy : http://www.thebodyonline.net/
 
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NickNaylor

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You will be fine. Yes, it's stressful. Yes, there's an adjustment period. But as @Psai said, you made it through a selective admissions process, and clearly at least one group of people thought you could handle the curriculum.

Many people - including the same people you think are ahead of you - are likely going through the exact same thing. The culture of a bunch of type A people in a competitive environment, though, makes it difficult to be candid about those feelings.

Do the best you can, don't be afraid to do new things, and most of all don't be afraid to learn from your peers. It took me a bit to get comfortable to ask help from my peers, but it was incredibly useful for both myself and for them, since they got the chance to teach the material and solidify it for themselves. I found that I often learned better from my peers than from some of the teaching staff.

You will be fine and you'll adjust to the pace. Don't worry about that. For now, you just have to push through until you get to that point.

And if you ultimately decide that it's not worth it or this isn't what you thought you were signing up for, dropping out is not a failure. However, I would encourage you to remember that you've only just begun, and in the big scheme of things this is nothing more than an extremely small portion of the overall process of becoming a doctor and practicing as a doctor. Practicing medicine is NOT the pre-clinical years.

Good luck.
 

razor

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I'm the "intelligent but lazy" .
It takes the opposite to do well in most career fields. The most intelligent friends of mine are driving UPS trucks or bartending at night and play video games all day. The most motivated, not necessarily smartest, are unhappily grinding away at very lucrative careers. Intelligence does not equal medical school success but it can make things a little easier.
 

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I felt just like you when I started. Plenty of people feel that way. No one stats and things, "oh, this is way easier than expected." Your brain adjusts, as do your strategies. Everyone is just as insecure as you are right now. Don't worry, it gets better.
 

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It's normal to feel these things. And remember, even if you are at Harvard Medical School, 50% of students are at the top of the class, and 50% are at the bottom. Medical students at one point were at the top of their class. Now they are all together. Things aren't awesome like they used to be in undergrad. That might make you feel crappy.

Also, anatomy was the worst ****ing experience of my life and a lot of people thought it was too. In fact, pre-clinical classes suck. They aren't fun. They are horrible. Always look for that light at the end of the tunnel. Medical school isn't forever, being a physician is. I'm a third year now and it's so much better. I worked before medical school and it sucked. Totally unfulfilling.

The grass isn't always greener on the other side. Medical school sucks and it's okay if you feel that way. SDN only represents a small portion of the population. So you're okay, you will be okay, keep on going!!!
 

sunealoneal

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people know their stuff a lot better than I do
don't compare don't compare don't compare don't compare don't compare.

Just work hard. This first semester is really about figuring out how you learn. My advice to 1st years is to really dedicate yourself for the first set of exams. Don't take nights off going out after the first week or watching Netflix. Just see how things go after this.

If things work out to your liking, excellent. You can turn it down a notch if you're comfortable. If you don't do well, just realize that there are so many styles of studying.

Just make sure you stay an active learner. One of the pitfalls I saw in the beginning was people staring at their PowerPoint slides, mindlessly copying material onto notes, or passively watching Acland. There are many ways to stay an active learner, and it will eventually become second nature to you. An example I can think off of the top of my head is a classmate of mine who goes through a recorded lecture once, then goes through the slides and sees if he can recall the information without looking. If he missed something he'd go over it again and again until he got it.

Oh that reminds me, repetition. Make sure you do several passes.

I really just wanted to say "don't compare", but I just kept typing until it ballooned into this. Sorry. A bit too much caffeine. Good luck, don't hesitate to PM me if you have more questions.

PS, I love my preclinical years. Honestly. Staying positive is such an important thing. As soon as you start grumbling about how things are clinically irrelevant or low yield, the sooner things turn sour. For me anyway. Many many many people grumble their way through and are much more successful than me. But that goes back to why you don't compare I suppose.
 
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Falconclaw

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don't compare don't compare don't compare don't compare don't compare.

Just work hard. This first semester is really about figuring out how you learn. My advice to 1st years is to really dedicate yourself for the first set of exams. Don't take nights off going out after the first week or watching Netflix. Just see how things go after this.

If things work out to your liking, excellent. You can turn it down a notch if you're comfortable. If you don't do well, just realize that there are so many styles of studying.

Just make sure you stay an active learner. One of the pitfalls I saw in the beginning was people staring at their PowerPoint slides, mindlessly copying material onto notes, or passively watching Acland. There are many ways to stay an active learner, and it will eventually become second nature to you. An example I can think off of the top of my head is a classmate of mine who goes through a recorded lecture once, then goes through the slides and sees if he can recall the information without looking. If he missed something he'd go over it again and again until he got it.

Oh that reminds me, repetition. Make sure you do several passes.

I really just wanted to say "don't compare", but I just kept typing until it ballooned into this. Sorry. A bit too much caffeine. Good luck, don't hesitate to PM me if you have more questions.

PS, I love my preclinical years. Honestly. Staying positive is such an important thing. As soon as you start grumbling about how things are clinically irrelevant or low yield, the sooner things turn sour. For me anyway. Many many many people grumble their way through and are much more successful than me. But that goes back to why you don't compare I suppose.
Actually I totally agree with you. If I just read a couple of pages of anatomy text, or just read through the dissector, I retain very little information. However, when I went into the lab today (the TA's were really nice to give us a practice pin exam), I learned so much more in three hours then I would've just passively reading. I walked in knowing about a third of the structures pinned and three hours later, with some help from fellow classmates and Netter's, I basically knew them all.

The tough thing is that it's not just devoting time to studying, it's making sure you're studying in an effective way.

I actually think anatomy is pretty interesting, and for basically the first time in a bio subject, I get to see what I learn up close. But hey, we'll see how I sound after our first test this Tuesday. It's just back and thorax, and they gave us Monday off to study, so as long as I use the time wisely I should be aight.
 

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It's a little crazy that I can write a thread title like that after only two days in med school, but that's just how I feel. Orientation was a blast, and I really like my classmates and I've made some great friends here. Our first class is anatomy. I actually more or less enjoy dissecting cadavers and find learning about the various parts interesting during the lab, but I'm already starting to feel like I'm falling behind and people know their stuff a lot better than I do. I was really nervous before starting med school because I've long known that I'm the "intelligent but lazy" type and med school is all about memorization. But I guess I'm really awful at making decisions, I had already changed my mind in regards to my career too many times, and parental pressure led me to going down this path anyway. I always found humanities stuff more interesting than science but I picked medicine over law because healing people is a lot more compelling than me than boring document review all day.

I'm just bad at studying. I guess it's something that I can get better at, but it's hard. It's crazy that I got this far with my bad study habits. I did only get into one MD school, albeit a relatively strong one. But it's really hard for me to just sit down and memorize where everything in the body is.

In terms of other career options, I really don't know what else I would do. If I didn't get into med school this past cycle I probably would've applied to law school. That material seems more up my alley but obviously requires a lot of studying too. I feel like I'd rather just go get a job and start working rather than study, but I don't really have a great plan B. It's literally only been two days (right now we're just doing anatomy for two weeks) so I obviously haven't failed anything yet so maybe this panic is premature, but you guys can let me know.
If you are having issues staying focused or not excited about med school in the first week, then you are in for a long 4 yrs. My first week I couldn't wait for class to start and hit the books flying to get off to a good start...
 

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If you are having issues staying focused or not excited about med school in the first week, then you are in for a long 4 yrs. My first week I couldn't wait for class to start and hit the books flying to get off to a good start...
...
 
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I am at an Osteopathic school and would easily trade places with you, getting into one MD school is a huge accomplishment
Why don't you like your school? I'm loving OMS-1 so far (really love our OMM department!). Granted, it's only been 1 month. Still, I couldn't have picked better classmates myself. Everyone is so willing to collaborate and share study materials/methods.

OP, this adjustment period has been tough for me too. I have always been a slow, meticulous studier, so straight up memorization feels mind numbing. It's all a means to an end, though. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
 
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Why don't you like your school?

I'm loving OMM so far. Granted, it's only been 1 month. Still, I couldn't have picked better classmates myself. Everyone is so willing to collaborate and share study materials/methods.

This adjustment period has been tough for me too, OP. I have always been a slow, meticulous studier, so straight up memorization feels mind numbing. It's all a means to an end, though. There is light at the end of the tunnel.
I did not say I did not like my school, but if I had the opportunity to go to an MD school I would definitely take it, the opportunities you have as an MD are far superior to those as a DO, there is no comparison. In many parts of the country you face discrimination as a DO, in residency programs, from patients who just do not trust you, or just plain ignorance.

That being said if you accept your limitations I think DO school is okay, there are still good job opportunities for DOs in certain regions of the country, we cannot go to big academic medical centers in major US cities as easily as our MD peers, it is possible but its a more uphill battle as a DO.
 
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hmockingbird

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I was on this struggle bus at the start of med school as well. Add that to the fact that I was an English major in college - don't get me wrong, I found my humanities classes to be just as difficult as my science pre-reqs and had to work just as much. However, the way those classes are set up gives more of a schedule of shorter, more intense bursts of effort (reading, which is fun for me, and then writing papers occasionally) than med school where you have to study all the time to keep up. I was used to having a lot more free time/leeway.

That being said I adjusted. And you can too. Especially since you said you do like the class, I think you are likely just panicking, and I would stick it out for a semester before you decide whether this is just feelings of inadequacy and adjustment, vs an actual dislike of the career. There are opportunities for humanities in medical school as well.
 

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I was on this struggle bus at the start of med school as well. Add that to the fact that I was an English major in college - don't get me wrong, I found my humanities classes to be just as difficult as my science pre-reqs and had to work just as much. However, the way those classes are set up gives more of a schedule of shorter, more intense bursts of effort (reading, which is fun for me, and then writing papers occasionally) than med school where you have to study all the time to keep up. I was used to having a lot more free time/leeway.

That being said I adjusted. And you can too. Especially since you said you do like the class, I think you are likely just panicking, and I would stick it out for a semester before you decide whether this is just feelings of inadequacy and adjustment, vs an actual dislike of the career. There are opportunities for humanities in medical school as well.
Cmon dude. Let's be real here.
 
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ChiTownBHawks

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Yeah bio 101 is soon much harder than applying intricate literary theories written in lofty language you can barely understand. Gotcha.
Not to start a war here but I took 300 level English courses and yes they were a complete joke.
 

hmockingbird

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Not to start a war here but I took 300 level English courses and yes they were a complete joke.
Good for you, maybe either you are good at them, or it depends on the class/school/teacher. Some of my 300 level classes were easy and some were not, same with science (I also took upper level science classes beyond the pre-reqs).

ETA: If you did not want to start a flame war then don't insult me in the first place.
 

ChiTownBHawks

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Good for you, maybe either you are good at them, or it depends on the class/school/teacher. Some of my 300 level classes were easy and some were not, same with science.

ETA: If you did not want to start a flame war then don't insult me in the first place.
? Who insulted you? Damn. U too serious, bro.
 

hmockingbird

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? Who insulted you? Damn. U too serious, bro.
Um, posting inflammatory remarks about how non-science majors have it easy is a) asking for a flame war and b) insulting to people who go into those fields.

Maybe it is a case of different types of intelligence/approaches but that doesn't make it any less valid or difficult and I'm tired of seeing comments like this on here so yes I call them out when they happen.
 

ChiTownBHawks

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Um, posting inflammatory remarks about how non-science majors have it easy is a) asking for a flame war and b) insulting to people who go into those fields.

Maybe it is a case of different types of intelligence/approaches but that doesn't make it any less valid or difficult and I'm tired of seeing comments like this on here so yes I call them out when they happen.
I said that? I don't see me saying that anywhere.

Who said anything about it being any less "valid"? Man, you assume a **** ton.

Regardless, lighten up hondo. It's the Internet.
 

cbrons

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It's a little crazy that I can write a thread title like that after only two days in med school, but that's just how I feel. Orientation was a blast, and I really like my classmates and I've made some great friends here. Our first class is anatomy. I actually more or less enjoy dissecting cadavers and find learning about the various parts interesting during the lab, but I'm already starting to feel like I'm falling behind and people know their stuff a lot better than I do. I was really nervous before starting med school because I've long known that I'm the "intelligent but lazy" type and med school is all about memorization. But I guess I'm really awful at making decisions, I had already changed my mind in regards to my career too many times, and parental pressure led me to going down this path anyway. I always found humanities stuff more interesting than science but I picked medicine over law because healing people is a lot more compelling than me than boring document review all day.
Just get your ass in gear son, you will be okay. A lot of these feelings are pretty normal.

Of course it's hard, if it was easy everyone would do it.


If you really don't like this career path though, then yes, now is the time to get out. But don't get out because you think you can't do it.
 
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circulus vitios

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Drop out now. I had similar feelings and waited until the end of first semester to pull the ripcord. $40k down the drain.
 

Roxas

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Drop out now. I had similar feelings and waited until the end of first semester to pull the ripcord. $40k down the drain.
Good to see you again man, how's life treating you these days?
 

circulus vitios

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Good to see you again man, how's life treating you these days?
Back at my soul-sucking, swing shift crap wage manual labor job and studying for the GMAT so I can enroll in a masters program for accounting.

It's better than med school.
 

Roxas

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Back at my soul-sucking, swing shift crap wage manual labor job and studying for the GMAT so I can enroll in a masters program for accounting.

It's better than med school.
I hope the best for you man
 

Bacchus

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If you are having issues staying focused or not excited about med school in the first week, then you are in for a long 4 yrs. My first week I couldn't wait for class to start and hit the books flying to get off to a good start...
Do you rain on all parades? Not helpful.
 

Bacchus

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I didn't see anyone state this.

If you feel you aren't studying effectively, talk with your Dean of Students who cam direct you where to go. Get help early. Even though you "got through the admissions process" not everyone does well. I was an AWFUL MS1/2. I should have asked for help. There's no foul in asking.
 
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I did not say I did not like my school, but if I had the opportunity to go to an MD school I would definitely take it, the opportunities you have as an MD are far superior to those as a DO, there is no comparison. In many parts of the country you face discrimination as a DO, in residency programs, from patients who just do not trust you, or just plain ignorance.

That being said if you accept your limitations I think DO school is okay, there are still good job opportunities for DOs in certain regions of the country, we cannot go to big academic medical centers in major US cities as easily as our MD peers, it is possible but its a more uphill battle as a DO.
I get where you're coming from.

Just so happy to be in medical school that it's hard to be objective right now.
 

Mad Jack

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Yeah bio 101 is soooooooooo much harder than applying intricate literary theories written in lofty, abstract language you can barely understand. Gotcha.

Critical thinking>memorization.
Intricate literary theories? I mostly just BSed my way to humanities As with papers I wrote the night before...
 
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I get where you're coming from.

Just so happy to be in medical school that it's hard to be objective right now.
True, I am glad to be in medical school and glad I am in a good DO program, there are some programs that are not so great, its usually the clinical part of the program that falls short, when you consider Medicine is a clinical science that is not a good thing.
 
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