tracheatoedoc

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7+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2009
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I've been looking at the stats, and agree with many other posters that Carib grads are facing a challenge in about 2 or 3 years and beyond. The increase in DO positions is staggering and they generally prefer an allopathic residency.
The average Carib grad has always been a bottom feeder and after reviewing some things, I would not recommend anyone start a Caribbean MD program at this time. Maybe things will change in the next few years, i.e. more residency positions.
For the time being, beware.
I feel foolish to have so enthusiastically endorsed the idea of offshore education.
 

Phur

7+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2010
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It is looking more and more like a poor prognosis for those going to the Caribbean for school, but at the same time you can't predict what's going to happen in 4 years time. It could range from a huge boost in GME positions to laws banning non-LCME from practicing being the two extremes. As a current student, I think the key is continuing to give the same advice that has been given for years to those considering Carib med school.
1) Use it as an absolute last resort.
2) Do your homework and make sure you know what you're getting into.
3) When you get there, bust your butt because you are far from a sure thing and not guaranteed anything.
 

Taurus

Paul Revere of Medicine
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Jul 27, 2004
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The advice I give to people is go US MD and if you have to, DO. If you still can't get in after all that, consider another career. It's better to face the harsh reality now than be burdened with $250k in debt, wasting 4 years, and no future. I would never have considered Carib and it's even more true now.
 

dragonfly99

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May 15, 2008
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I don't know...I was totally going to go down there if I didn't get into a US school. But currently, if I were in that position I would definitely push hard for a DO school. They weren't as prominent when I was applying to school, and they all seemed to require a letter from a DO...and I didn't know any at the time.

I wouldn't be surprised if more residency positions opened up in a few years...but with the sucky economy in the US, perhaps not. It's basically a political decision, though, about whether the US wants to spend the money. If there are more residencies created, would think they will be primary care ones, and/or will be in currently underserved areas (i.e. not more residencies in New York or California, etc.).