Dec 3, 2009
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Tallahassee
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This may sound like a really unnecessary question but it just doesn't make very much sense to me. It is widely known that a fairly comprehensive anatomy/physio knowledge is necessary for mcat and medschool. so I am curious how everyone gets the anatomy/physio knowledge they need. I mean, the closest thing to anatomy that I'll be taking is vertebrate physiology but that's obviously not focused on humans. Now, naturally, through exposure and personal interest and volunteer and shadowing etc. a basic understanding will be acquired but that basic understanding seems to be insufficient for what ive been seeing on practice mcat's. Do you all buy a cheap used A/P text from half.com or somethng and try to teach yourself or get a deck of A/P flashcards?? whats the secret here because ive always been told not to take the actual A/P I + II sequence since it will be so heavily ingrained during our first year or so of medschool. comments thoughts ideas?
 

Morsetlis

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This may sound like a really unnecessary question but it just doesn't make very much sense to me. It is widely known that a fairly comprehensive anatomy/physio knowledge is necessary for mcat and medschool. so I am curious how everyone gets the anatomy/physio knowledge they need. I mean, the closest thing to anatomy that I'll be taking is vertebrate physiology but that's obviously not focused on humans. Now, naturally, through exposure and personal interest and volunteer and shadowing etc. a basic understanding will be acquired but that basic understanding seems to be insufficient for what ive been seeing on practice mcat's. Do you all buy a cheap used A/P text from half.com or somethng and try to teach yourself or get a deck of A/P flashcards?? whats the secret here because ive always been told not to take the actual A/P I + II sequence since it will be so heavily ingrained during our first year or so of medschool. comments thoughts ideas?
Incorrect. A&P isn't on the MCAT. You learn A&P in medical school... as you learn it. And not before.

You need to know, for the MCAT:

-gen chem
-ochem
-physics
-biochemistry
-cell bio and genetics
-how to read/write
 
Dec 3, 2009
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Tallahassee
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interesting... here are the chapters in the TPR hyperlearning Bio review...
-Nervous System
-Endocrine System
-Circulatory
-Lymphatic
-Immune Systems
-Digestive System
-Excretory System
-Muscle Systems
-Skeletal System
-etc etc etc

its funny that ive taken my bio sequence and we didnt go into any of this. I mean, some of this was mentioned at a cellular or molecular level and most of the time relating to other organisms, not humans. SO, why are they forceffeding this in the review material for MCAT?
 

Morsetlis

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As far as I'm concerned that stuff is on a "nice to know" basis. For example, there might be a question about blood type, or there might be a question about the RAAS or a/b agonists. Whatever the question is, if it's an A&P question, you will have all the info you need to answer it. You'd only have to apply logic to solve it.

All the stuff I listed in bullet points are vastly more important than knowing all the sphincters of the gastrointestinal tract.
 

tremulousNeedle

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Incorrect. A&P isn't on the MCAT. You learn A&P in medical school... as you learn it. And not before.

You need to know, for the MCAT:

-gen chem
-ochem
-physics
-biochemistry
-cell bio and genetics
-how to read/write

Your peer is correct. The A&P on the MCAT only goes as far as what you have learned in the courses mentioned above (maybe a little extra, but MCAT study books usually cover what's necessary).

Furthermore, it would be wise to not think of the MCAT as a content exam, but rather a critical thinking skills exam. The MCAT is testing your ability to gather information from the passages, process it, and use this processed information to answer questions. Everyone knows that physics and ochem are not necessary to succeed in medical school. These subjects are just subject matter that the AAMC uses to test your thinking abilities (under time constraints).

-senior medical student / admissions committee interviewer
 
Dec 3, 2009
181
1
0
Tallahassee
Status
Pre-Medical
Your peer is correct. The A&P on the MCAT only goes as far as what you have learned in the courses mentioned above (maybe a little extra, but MCAT study books usually cover what's necessary).

Furthermore, it would be wise to not think of the MCAT as a content exam, but rather a critical thinking skills exam. The MCAT is testing your ability to gather information from the passages, process it, and use this processed information to answer questions. Everyone knows that physics and ochem are not necessary to succeed in medical school. These subjects are just subject matter that the AAMC uses to test your thinking abilities (under time constraints).

-senior medical student / admissions committee interviewer
thanks everyone for the clarification; much appreciated
best,
michael rw
 
2

245399

interesting... here are the chapters in the TPR hyperlearning Bio review...
-Nervous System
-Endocrine System
-Circulatory
-Lymphatic
-Immune Systems
-Digestive System
-Excretory System
-Muscle Systems
-Skeletal System
-etc etc etc

its funny that ive taken my bio sequence and we didnt go into any of this. I mean, some of this was mentioned at a cellular or molecular level and most of the time relating to other organisms, not humans. SO, why are they forceffeding this in the review material for MCAT?

If you do not know these topics well, you will have a very difficult time with the bio section. In my experience, the physiology knowledge tested went beyond the scope of the prerequisites but not beyond what was covered in the standard review books.
Good luck.