J29622

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2013
152
170
Status
Podiatry Student
I was looking over the entrance stats of my current class and it seems that they're going up significantly.

At least for my program, the stats minus the MCAT seem to be approaching some of the DO schools. I know DMU has had stats rivaling some of the DO programs for a while.

The stats at my school, which is one of the larger ones, is cGPA of 3.43 and sGPA of 3.30. The MCAT avg is still a bit low at 23, or 496-497, but the applicant pool seems to be improving.

Is this something that's becoming a trend?
 

JPS398

5+ Year Member
Dec 10, 2013
370
192
Status
Pre-Podiatry
Hopefully after this year.. my GPA's are lower than that significantly.

Without grade forgiveness it's difficult. Remember DO's offer grade forgiveness. I'd say DPM is right there with them on the GPA's or very close.

With grade forgiveness my sci gpa is 3.2 instead of 2.93. Big difference one mess up makes..
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: dr.phoot

dr.phoot

2+ Year Member
Mar 5, 2016
558
382
Status
Pre-Podiatry
Hopefully after this year.. my GPA's are lower than that significantly.

Without grade forgiveness it's difficult. Remember DO's offer grade forgiveness. I'd say DPM is right there with them on the GPA's or very close.

With grade forgiveness my sci gpa is 3.2 instead of 2.93. Big difference one mess up makes..
A bit of a similar situation myself. I'm hoping I can get in for Fall '17 despite lower stats
 

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,076
2,499
Status
Podiatry Student
Ditto with the dr.phoot and JPS398

A lot of friends I personally know who went DO had way higher stats even without forgiveness.

I'm talking 3.6-3.8 at honors level + research + ECs.

Always thought the stats for DO schools were much higher than DPM schools?

Not knocking on them, just an anecdote.
 
OP
J29622

J29622

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2013
152
170
Status
Podiatry Student
Ditto with the dr.phoot and JPS398

A lot of friends I personally know who went DO had way higher stats even without forgiveness.

I'm talking 3.6-3.8 at honors level + research + ECs.

Always thought the stats for DO schools were much higher than DPM schools?

Not knocking on them, just an anecdote.
DO schools are certainly more competitive than podiatry schools overall. That being said, I also know of quite a few of high GPA + MCAT students that are in my class. One of the guys I study with had a 3.8 GPA and a 30 MCAT and turned down an MD acceptance because he preferred podiatry.

Not everyone who goes into podiatry was a medical school reject. I, for one, had the stats to go to medical school. I chose podiatry.
 

heybrother

7+ Year Member
Oct 17, 2011
748
558
Status
Podiatrist
There are so many more "degrees" of competitiveness that are not being captured by just a comparison of numbers and even comparing numbers doesn't necessarily mean anything.

Most of my classmates went to schools no one has heard of.
The podiatry GPA software imo is not strict in how it asks you to assign your classes to categories. You could fudge it to boost your science GPA.
The ideal application only has 1 try at the MCAT on it.
The ideal medical school application is EARLY.

I'm not claiming every DO/MD applicant has all these things going on. I'm just saying there's a spectrum of quality and the imperfections aren't captured in the reported stats.

This isn't directed at anyone in particular, but you could get into podiatry school at the last minute before school starts with "decent stats" and spend the rest of your life saying "yeah, I had medical school stats." Part of getting to go to medical school is having the maturity or planning to have your ducks in a row to apply for medical school the day the application opens. My state's application cycle closes in September and you're probably already late at that point. Podiatry schools are still finalizing their classes 2 weeks before the semester starts.
 
OP
J29622

J29622

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2013
152
170
Status
Podiatry Student
There are so many more "degrees" of competitiveness that are not being captured by just a comparison of numbers and even comparing numbers doesn't necessarily mean anything.

Most of my classmates went to schools no one has heard of.
The podiatry GPA software imo is not strict in how it asks you to assign your classes to categories. You could fudge it to boost your science GPA.
The ideal application only has 1 try at the MCAT on it.
The ideal medical school application is EARLY.

I'm not claiming every DO/MD applicant has all these things going on. I'm just saying there's a spectrum of quality and the imperfections aren't captured in the reported stats.

This isn't directed at anyone in particular, but you could get into podiatry school at the last minute before school starts with "decent stats" and spend the rest of your life saying "yeah, I had medical school stats." Part of getting to go to medical school is having the maturity or planning to have your ducks in a row to apply for medical school the day the application opens. My state's application cycle closes in September and you're probably already late at that point. Podiatry schools are still finalizing their classes 2 weeks before the semester starts.
I agree. There is no quesetion that DO and MD schools are more competitive. My only point is the stats seem to be improving year by year. A slow but progressive change.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weirdy

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,076
2,499
Status
Podiatry Student
There are so many more "degrees" of competitiveness that are not being captured by just a comparison of numbers and even comparing numbers doesn't necessarily mean anything.

Most of my classmates went to schools no one has heard of.
The podiatry GPA software imo is not strict in how it asks you to assign your classes to categories. You could fudge it to boost your science GPA.
The ideal application only has 1 try at the MCAT on it.
The ideal medical school application is EARLY.

I'm not claiming every DO/MD applicant has all these things going on. I'm just saying there's a spectrum of quality and the imperfections aren't captured in the reported stats.

This isn't directed at anyone in particular, but you could get into podiatry school at the last minute before school starts with "decent stats" and spend the rest of your life saying "yeah, I had medical school stats." Part of getting to go to medical school is having the maturity or planning to have your ducks in a row to apply for medical school the day the application opens. My state's application cycle closes in September and you're probably already late at that point. Podiatry schools are still finalizing their classes 2 weeks before the semester starts.
Agree.

Little bro is applying MD.

Even the process is a lot more selective than pod schools and takes much longer.

Secondaries especially. While most pods around this time are already getting their first ii, some MD/DO applicants are still finishing up secondaries sent to them by the schools after they've already been screened once.
 

dr.phoot

2+ Year Member
Mar 5, 2016
558
382
Status
Pre-Podiatry
DO schools are certainly more competitive than podiatry schools overall. That being said, I also know of quite a few of high GPA + MCAT students that are in my class. One of the guys I study with had a 3.8 GPA and a 30 MCAT and turned down an MD acceptance because he preferred podiatry.

Not everyone who goes into podiatry was a medical school reject. I, for one, had the stats to go to medical school. I chose podiatry.
This, for me, is where the problem really stems from. I feel as if some in pod feel the need to defend their decision for going pod. Like a point to prove, or something along those lines. (Not saying that's the case with you).

When I first told my parents I was going pod they countered that I was only choosing that route because it's easier to get into. When I tell some friends I'm going pod, it's as if I'm only going pod becuase I didn't have the stats for M.D./D.O. (it's how they make it seem).


End of the day, I think it's about inner peace and acceptance. If admission stats will stay low and allow 2.3s to get a chance, hey that's good news for people--like me--who screwed up at some point and are willing to put in the hard work when they get into pod school. Getting in, staying in, and finishing are three different things, no?

Looking at the recent booklet that was released, the stats are definitely going up though. Threads from '06ish had 2.5s, etc. Last year's class were mostly in the 3.3+; including people getting graduate degrees to compensate for lower undergrad performances.

I just want to get in. Approximately zero "effs" will be given about everything and everyone else.

end rant.
 
OP
J29622

J29622

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2013
152
170
Status
Podiatry Student
This, for me, is where the problem really stems from. I feel as if some in pod feel the need to defend their decision for going pod. Like a point to prove, or something along those lines. (Not saying that's the case with you).

When I first told my parents I was going pod they countered that I was only choosing that route because it's easier to get into. When I tell some friends I'm going pod, it's as if I'm only going pod becuase I didn't have the stats for M.D./D.O. (it's how they make it seem).


End of the day, I think it's about inner peace and acceptance. If admission stats will stay low and allow 2.3s to get a chance, hey that's good news for people--like me--who screwed up at some point and are willing to put in the hard work when they get into pod school. Getting in, staying in, and finishing are three different things, no?

Looking at the recent booklet that was released, the stats are definitely going up though. Threads from '06ish had 2.5s, etc. Last year's class were mostly in the 3.3+; including people getting graduate degrees to compensate for lower undergrad performances.

I just want to get in. Approximately zero "effs" will be given about everything and everyone else.

end rant.
This is because historically it has been the case that podiatry schools were backup schools for people who couldn't get into MD / DO schools or whatever reason. I was responding to the point made that there were people with higher stats that went to DO school. My point was that while DO schools are presently more competitive than DPM schools, there were still highly qualified applicants in DPM schools. Equating lower entrance stats with inferior doctors is a gross simplification. I know of a lot of people who weren't amazing in undergrad that got their act together in their post-graduate training. People mature up at different stages of their lives.

And yes, a lot of the marginal students fail out for one reason or another. Staying in is definitely not easy nor is landing a high quality residency program. If someone can graduate with good grades and end up a great doctor, then that person is certainly deserving of respect.
 

dr.phoot

2+ Year Member
Mar 5, 2016
558
382
Status
Pre-Podiatry
Agree.

Little bro is applying MD.

Even the process is a lot more selective than pod schools and takes much longer.

Secondaries especially. While most pods around this time are already getting their first ii, some MD/DO applicants are still finishing up secondaries sent to them by the schools after they've already been screened once.
That's nuts. Sounds like we won the lottery with our system then.
 
OP
J29622

J29622

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2013
152
170
Status
Podiatry Student
That's nuts. Sounds like we won the lottery with our system then.
Depends on how you look at it. It's certainly nice if you're applying and want to get in. I definitely don't envy MD / DO applicants and the hell their application process is. My cousin did it and was stressed out the entire year. That being said, podiatry does need to eventually improve its overall applicant pool. So long as it's seen as merely a backup option to MD / DO / DDS, it will always have a stigma associated with it.

It's good to see that the stats are improving, and I hope that it will continue to do so.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weirdy

dr.phoot

2+ Year Member
Mar 5, 2016
558
382
Status
Pre-Podiatry
This is because historically it has been the case that podiatry schools were backup schools for people who couldn't get into MD / DO schools or whatever reason. I was responding to the point made that there were people with higher stats that went to DO school. My point was that while DO schools are presently more competitive than DPM schools, there were still highly qualified applicants. Equating lower entrance stats with inferior doctors is a gross simplification. I know of a lot of people who weren't amazing in undergrad that got their act together in their post-graduate training. People mature up at different stages of their lives.

And yes, a lot of the marginal students fail out for one reason or another. Staying in is definitely not easy nor is landing a high quality residency program. If someone can graduate with good grades and end up great doctors, then that person is certainly deserving of respect.
I agree with you. I think it's even been pointed out on this thread that the D.O.s have their grade replacement system where the most recent grade is the one counted. That can shift the numbers in their favor a bit.

You're spot on
 

dr.phoot

2+ Year Member
Mar 5, 2016
558
382
Status
Pre-Podiatry
Depends on how you look at it. It's certainly nice if you're applying and want to get in. I definitely don't envy MD / DO applicants and the hell their application process is. My cousin did it and was stressed out the entire year. That being said, podiatry does need to eventually improve its overall applicant pool. So long as it's seen as merely a backup option to MD / DO / DDS, it will always have a stigma associated with it.

It's good to see that the stats are improving, and I hope that it will continue to do so.
If 3.7+ was what was required to get in, would pod still be worth it for you, in your opinion? I feel the stigma will always be there unless pod is swallowed up into traditional medical school and gets an MD/DO title.

2.8 - 3.4 should be good enough; with the occasional exceptions for the 2.5s+. Even if they allowed people with lower stats in, I think students will weed themselves out once they're in school. If deep down you wanted to be an MD/DO you're only hurting yourself.

I feel money spent on advertisement and marketing will do the field a huge favor! People who aren't in medicine and the sciences rarely know what pod is, that pod has its own school, they perform surgeries etc. Can't they get a pod into a couple of episodes of House, Scrubs, Grey's Anatomy?

Just an aside, what is it that killed law school and pharmacy? I'm hearing that those fields are getting too crowded. Is it because they accepted just anybody?
 
OP
J29622

J29622

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2013
152
170
Status
Podiatry Student
I'm not sure what you mean by "pod being worth it to me." My decision to pursue podiatry had nothing to do with the entrance stats. Medicine is full of egos and elitism so I doubt we would ever be 100% accepted by the MD community. Even DOs, which are functionally equivalent, face the occasional discrimination. That being said, as more and more highly trained DPMs enter practice, their value and training will be recognized by the medical community more and more. From my understanding, DPMs are already highly respected in many places in the country. This trend will continue so long as podiatry continues to evolve as it has.

I'm not too familiar with law and pharmacy (although I had considered pharmacy at one point), but my understanding is they simply opened up too many schools relative to the demand. Dentistry is apparently moving more and more in this direction as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Weirdy
T

torontopharm

Just an aside, what is it that killed law school and pharmacy? I'm hearing that those fields are getting too crowded. Is it because they accepted just anybody?
$$$.
Pharmacists make about ~120k/year at CVS based on a 40 hour work week. It's the path of least resistance to a decent salary and gives you the opportunity to start making $$$ early given you find full time hours. They generally make more than some other doctoral professions (OD's/DPT's/ Vets etc.). That's probably why you still have kids flocking to pharmacy schools and new schools keep popping up.
 

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,076
2,499
Status
Podiatry Student
$$$.
Pharmacists make about ~120k/year at CVS based on a 40 hour work week. It's the path of least resistance to a decent salary and gives you the opportunity to start making $$$ early given you find full time hours. They generally make more than some other doctoral professions (OD's/DPT's/ Vets etc.). That's probably why you still have kids flocking to pharmacy schools and new schools keep popping up.
The saturation is insane though.

Not knocking yalls profession or anything but unless you're getting a gig with big time retailers like Walmart and whatnot, isn't it pretty hard to find places that'll give you enough hours?

Have a few friends who have finished, and some who are currently in pharm school. The one who has been out for at least 5+ years now is still jumping place to place because they dont' have enough hours to spread around. Is this an accurate representation?
 

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,076
2,499
Status
Podiatry Student
If 3.7+ was what was required to get in, would pod still be worth it for you, in your opinion? I feel the stigma will always be there unless pod is swallowed up into traditional medical school and gets an MD/DO title.

2.8 - 3.4 should be good enough; with the occasional exceptions for the 2.5s+. Even if they allowed people with lower stats in, I think students will weed themselves out once they're in school. If deep down you wanted to be an MD/DO you're only hurting yourself.

I feel money spent on advertisement and marketing will do the field a huge favor! People who aren't in medicine and the sciences rarely know what pod is, that pod has its own school, they perform surgeries etc. Can't they get a pod into a couple of episodes of House, Scrubs, Grey's Anatomy?

Just an aside, what is it that killed law school and pharmacy? I'm hearing that those fields are getting too crowded. Is it because they accepted just anybody?
Personal opinion: anything below 2.9-3.0 shouldn't be allowed.

Students will always have the potential to do a complete turnaround (given the shot to prove so with a post-bac or Masters that's not grade inflated).

Its good that the stats are getting higher.
 
Apr 7, 2015
221
276
Status
Podiatry Student
It's not just podiatry that's getting more competitive--it's all of medicine. That being said, podiatry is not at the competitive level of the MD/DO degree. It's getting closer to typical DO class profiles in terms of GPA, but the MCAT scores are still lagging behind pretty significantly. Will podiatry eventually catch up to the DO's in terms of competitiveness? Maybe. Will that end up producing better doctors? I don't think so.
 

GypsyHummus

7+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
4,280
2,635
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I think in about 8 years, Podiatry schools are going to have DO like stats. There are too many people graduating with worthless biology degrees in the 3.0-3.2 GPA range who couldn't cut the MCAT for whatever reason (I can defiantly relate) who will flood applications, and podiatry school offering the big "Dr." title and six figures is too tempting for some people to pass up. I mean, who wouldn't want to say they are a foot and ankle surgeon operating in the OR? Sounds a lot better than "Random lab tech making 35k/year" at the local community hospital, if the current bio grads can even get that at all.

I have family in podiatry, and I can say with certainty, y'all work really hard for the amount of flack you get.
 

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,076
2,499
Status
Podiatry Student
I think in about 8 years, Podiatry schools are going to have DO like stats. There are too many people graduating with worthless biology degrees in the 3.0-3.2 GPA range who couldn't cut the MCAT for whatever reason (I can defiantly relate) who will flood applications, and podiatry school offering the big "Dr." title and six figures is too tempting for some people to pass up. I mean, who wouldn't want to say they are a foot and ankle surgeon operating in the OR? Sounds a lot better than "Random lab tech making 35k/year" at the local community hospital, if the current bio grads can even get that at all.

I have family in podiatry, and I can say with certainty, y'all work really hard for the amount of flack you get.
Decreasing wages though.

With the way insurance is going we'd be lucky enough to hit 6 figure in 8 years. Especially with shift towards salaried hospital/large groups.

Completely agree with what you're saying though. Grade raise is crazy and not just in podiatry. Browsing the opto, pa, and pt threads some of these kids have amazing stats. Its only getting more competitive.
 

dr.phoot

2+ Year Member
Mar 5, 2016
558
382
Status
Pre-Podiatry
Decreasing wages though.

With the way insurance is going we'd be lucky enough to hit 6 figure in 8 years. Especially with shift towards salaried hospital/large groups.

Completely agree with what you're saying though. Grade raise is crazy and not just in podiatry. Browsing the opto, pa, and pt threads some of these kids have amazing stats. Its only getting more competitive.
The biggest thing for me with salary is, at the very least being able to pay off your loans and not live paycheck-to-paycheck. Not everyone wants to drive a Ferrari and live in millionaire zip codes, you know?

Even if such money was in your possession, some just prefer the subtle quiet life.

Whenever I had my doubts about going into pod, it was the money that made me have doubts. If I can't even pay off my loans, it's not worth it
 

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,076
2,499
Status
Podiatry Student
The biggest thing for me with salary is, at the very least being able to pay off your loans and not live paycheck-to-paycheck. Not everyone wants to drive a Ferrari and live in millionaire zip codes, you know?

Even if such money was in your possession, some just prefer the subtle quiet life.

Whenever I had my doubts about going into pod, it was the money that made me have doubts. If I can't even pay off my loans, it's not worth it
Totally get it. Had a talk with my gf about this an we both agreed that the salary is more than what we made before combined...ever.

But seeing some of these pods come out with families and kids to feed and put through school and hearing them emphasize how important it is to keep cost of living as low as possible....its scary.
 

GypsyHummus

7+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
4,280
2,635
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Decreasing wages though.

With the way insurance is going we'd be lucky enough to hit 6 figure in 8 years. Especially with shift towards salaried hospital/large groups.

Completely agree with what you're saying though. Grade raise is crazy and not just in podiatry. Browsing the opto, pa, and pt threads some of these kids have amazing stats. Its only getting more competitive.
Is it really that bad? I know Pods were always the lower compensated area on surgeons salaries, but not breaking six figures as a doctor, especially since Pods now have to do surgical residencies, doesn't seem too likely. If that is the case, I could see a lot of people not going into podiatry, despite the "Doctor" title and the aforementioned low GPA bio degree.

One nice thing is that Pods don't have to worry about the hostile takeover from Nurse Practitioners that the Family medicine and Gas docs are facing. I doubt that the government will let Nurses crack open an ankle and operate.

All in all, if someone can handle gross stuff and the smell of feet, Id say podiatry is a good path to go into. I don't see the saturation problem that ODs are facing, or even DDS.
 

GypsyHummus

7+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
4,280
2,635
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
The biggest thing for me with salary is, at the very least being able to pay off your loans and not live paycheck-to-paycheck. Not everyone wants to drive a Ferrari and live in millionaire zip codes, you know?

Even if such money was in your possession, some just prefer the subtle quiet life.

Whenever I had my doubts about going into pod, it was the money that made me have doubts. If I can't even pay off my loans, it's not worth it
Agreed. I just wanna make 150K (more like 100K after taxes, geeze), drive a nice new $20K chevy impala that I get a new one every 5 years, live in a studio apartment in an affordable state (preferably with no income tax), volunteer my time on Fridays to local health clinics, save 50K/year for retirement, and be able to afford a gym membership. I don't have to be on the cutting edge of medicine to find fulfillment in it.
 

GypsyHummus

7+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
4,280
2,635
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Totally get it. Had a talk with my gf about this an we both agreed that the salary is more than what we made before combined...ever.

But seeing some of these pods come out with families and kids to feed and put through school and hearing them emphasize how important it is to keep cost of living as low as possible....its scary.
Is your gf also going into podiatry? If so, you could make some serious dents in the student loans.
 

DexterMorganSK

Moderator
Gold Donor
2+ Year Member
Jul 16, 2016
1,524
1,885
NYC
Status
Podiatry Student
As we all know, the Pod salary depends on many factors such as location, years in the field, private vs. working for a hospital..etc.

For ex, Avg salary for a Pod in NYC, according to BLS is around 140K, whereas in Hawaii its over 230K. But for someone who just graduated from residency, in NYC, it's anywhere from 80-120K (according to the pod I shadowed), so it all depends.

Also, the salary would increase in the future if Podiatry schooling adds the USMLE exams in their curriculum, like the MD/DO schools.
 

GypsyHummus

7+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2011
4,280
2,635
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
As we all know, the Pod salary depends on many factors such as location, years in the field, private vs. working for a hospital..etc.

For ex, Avg salary for a Pod in NYC, according to BLS is around 140K, whereas in Hawaii its over 230K. But for someone who just graduated from residency, in NYC, it's anywhere from 80-120K (according to the pod I shadowed), so it all depends.

Also, the salary would increase in the future if Podiatry schooling adds the USMLE exams in their curriculum, like the MD/DO schools.
Do you think that pod schools would include the usmle? Then, there would be little separating pod schools from MD schools.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bobtheweazel

DexterMorganSK

Moderator
Gold Donor
2+ Year Member
Jul 16, 2016
1,524
1,885
NYC
Status
Podiatry Student
Do you think that pod schools would include the usmle? Then, there would be little separating pod schools from MD schools.
If Pod grads want similar status, salary, and benefits as the MD/DO, then I'm sure the USMLE addition would be a part of a Podiatry curriculum. We won't know until it actually happens, but when it does, however, entrance stats would increase drastically.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bobtheweazel

bobtheweazel

2+ Year Member
Jun 24, 2015
1,254
1,486
Earth
Status
Podiatry Student
Do you think that pod schools would include the usmle?
If Pod grads want similar status, salary, and benefits as the MD/DO, then I'm sure the USMLE addition would be a part of a Podiatry curriculum.
For what it's worth, I like the way y'all think.

And y'all aren't alone in thinking what you're thinking. Supposedly the California schools are going to be attempting the USMLE soon, presumably playing along with the joint task force (California Podiatric Medical Association, California Medical Association, and California Orthopedic Association) that's looking into potentially submitting some joint legislation in the next few years that would give podiatrists in California the same medical/surgical license as MDs and DOs. But that's all still very much in the testing phase if it happens at all and I believe the schools are paying for the exams so that they own them and if they turn out poorly the scores won't be released.

So on the one hand, how well would podiatry students actually do on the USMLE? Some podiatry schools are integrated with DOs or MDs, but even then I doubt that every DO student could pass the USMLE, let alone a podiatry student who may or may not be taking all of the DO courses. And besides that, what about the schools that aren't even affiliated with an MD or DO school?

On the other hand, we would barely have to pass. I mean, a pass is a pass. Some DO students probably couldn't pass the USMLE, and yet the fact that a good number of them do is apparently good enough to grant them practical parity. We would really only need a decent number of podiatry students to pass it (with any score) to prove the point. MDs have set up that exam and said "anyone who passes this exam is fit to be a physician", plain and simple.

But beyond all of that, there are some pretty serious problems to still contend with. Podiatrists would still need to pass the APMLE to become licensed podiatrists and passing the USMLE wouldn't let a podiatrist do an MD residency so it's usefulness would really end after the score report. Furthermore, the APMLE and USMLE—although there is a good amount of overlap—are two entirely different animals. It would be like preparing for the MCAT and the GRE at the same time (except harder) while taking a medical school courseload. They're written in different styles and are composed of different content. One glaring thing I see is that the APMLE step 1 is highly anatomy oriented (13% general anatomy and 25% lower extremity anatomy). So really you would be asking for the students, on top of their medical school courseloads to study for not one big crazy exam, but rather two different big crazy exams. And lastly, probably the largest obstacle would be cost. Throughout the course of the APMLE we will be shelling out nearly $4,000 total to get through all four components of the exam. USMLE is also over $3,000 once you add all of its component exams together. That's more than I wanna pay. That's more than anyone would want to pay for an exam that would potentially have zero direct impact on their residency placement or job prospects—I'm not saying it couldn't potentially impact those things but I'm saying currently there is no framework for USMLE to be taken into consideration for podiatric residency placement. And if you tried to get the schools or the APMA to foot the bill for 550-600 (yearly class size) podiatry students to get through the full course of the USMLE then you're talking about sinking about $2,000,000 into this idea for each class, so once it gets goin we'd be talking a yearly investment of about $2,000,000 for some score reports that probably can't prove much more than a thorough review of our curricula and training would prove anyway.

USMLE sounds appealing at first glance because it seems like a quick fix to any perceived obstacles between us and parity, and it is being looked into, but the USMLE comes with it's own set of obstacles which could further complicate the situation.
 
Last edited: