facetguy

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Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency still common:
http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20100322/cdc-babies-dont-get-enough-vitamin_d

From the article:

"In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics doubled its recommended daily intake of the vitamin for infants and children from 200 to 400 international units (IU) a day.
But according to the CDC estimate, only 5% to 13% of breastfed infants and 20% to 37% of formula-fed babies are getting enough vitamin D to meet the new guidelines."

Is this due to a fear of supplements? Or just a lack of education issue (which seems hard to believe at this point)?

Also from the article:
"Because breast milk contains very low levels of vitamin D, supplementation is recommended."

This is a common misconception. Breast milk contains very low levels of vitamin D because lactating women don't have high enough levels of vitamin D. Current thought is that supplementing the moms with 4000 -6000 IU/day of D allows for adequate vitamin D in breast milk. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17661558?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_SingleItemSupl.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=4&log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=pubmed)
and
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18290720

Hopefully things change soon.
 

oldbearprofessor

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But according to the CDC estimate, only 5% to 13% of breastfed infants

Is this due to a fear of supplements? Or just a lack of education issue (which seems hard to believe at this point)?
Vitamin drops are about $8-$10 for a 50 mL bottle that in theory would last 50 days, but of course doesn't due to spillage, etc. This is not covered by public assistance programs (WIC, medicaid) in almost any state (it is in a couple).
 

facetguy

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Vitamin drops are about $8-$10 for a 50 mL bottle that in theory would last 50 days, but of course doesn't due to spillage, etc. This is not covered by public assistance programs (WIC, medicaid) in almost any state (it is in a couple).
Relatively speaking, that is very inexpensive even at that price. Although there are D drops available at retail for less than that, so it's reasonable to assume that purchased in bulk (government scale) it would be even cheaper. Shouldn't thought be given toward making this a covered benefit? A few bucks a month? Sounds like a no-brainer to me.

Economic issues aside, are pediatricians recommending vitamin D supplementation?
 

oldbearprofessor

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Relatively speaking, that is very inexpensive even at that price. Although there are D drops available at retail for less than that, so it's reasonable to assume that purchased in bulk (government scale) it would be even cheaper. Shouldn't thought be given toward making this a covered benefit? A few bucks a month? Sounds like a no-brainer to me.
I think you should ask your elected representatives why they (government assistance programs) don't cover these drops. Let us know what they say.
 

facetguy

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I think you should ask your elected representatives why they (government assistance programs) don't cover these drops. Let us know what they say.
With you being a pediatrician, I thought perhaps you would be in a better position to make those phonecalls. Please keep us abreast of your progress.