Passion4Sci

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From personal experience, if you're on your FOB, or forward operating base, and are not on a watch shift, Ambien is perfectly fine, provided that after your sleep, you do not compromise mission integrity by being sluggish and groggy.

Benzodiazepines are a totally different story. It surprises me that, after the soldier in the article was prescribed clonazepam, he was able to return to mission readiness. When I was Rx'd clonazepam and quietiapine for post-traumatic stress in-country, I was put on a restriction that I couldn't participate in anything outside of the perimeter within 72h of taking the lorazepam. I was told by my CO that benzos were "not fit" for military use, and that as soon as we redeployed to Hood, I'd be drummed out of the army, issued a dishonorable, etc. I couldn't find any supporting Army documentation and of course, his threat went unrealized.

I am still on the fence about SSRIs for soldiers w/ PTSD. I don't like how all the research w/ SSRI fails to address combat trauma specifically, and it's possible that eliminating the reuptake of serotonin or norepinephrine in a pt or soldier who doesn't have a serotonin/norepi deficiency could be dangerous, as noted in the article. I was Rx'd Sertraline 50 and after 48 hours I had terrible suicidal ideation. Discontinued use and informed meddac.

It's a very nasty issue. For me as a squad leader, as long as mission readiness was never impacted, I had no problems with my soldiers taking sleeping aids or benzodiazepines. Being "less aware to noise" is the primary reason we take sleep medication in theater. Posts are busy, busy places at all hours of the day and night, and sleeping through the racket can be challenging no matter how tired one is, and base security is not compromised at all by sleeping aids (As long as everyone does the right thing). Thanks for the article, I hadn't seen that.
 

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http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1811858,00.html

Anyone else think it could be dangerous in a combat-type situation to have soldiers taking Ambien? Isn't it possible they would be less aware of noises, etc. if they're asleep because of the Ambien? Just curious.
This is a good topic.

I really like Gurnee, IL BTW. Six flags there is nice and I believe there's a restaurant called Saluto's that is awesome there.

Thread successfully hijacked :hijacked:
 

MountainPharmD

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I tell you, war is Hell! William Tecumseh Sherman addressing the graduating class of the Michigan Military Academy, 1879
Shell shock, battle fatigue, or the new term combat stress reaction have been around as long as men have warred against each other. It has been the last 90 or so years that it has been recognized officially and studied. The article is discussing the way the military is currently dealing with it.

I skimmed it real quick and did not see any mention of Ambien used in a combat zone. Psychiatric problems are nothing new for those serving in a war zone. I do not see why it would be a problem for those disorders to be treated the same as they would in the civilian world.
 
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Monalyce

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Benzodiazepines are a totally different story. It surprises me that, after the soldier in the article was prescribed clonazepam, he was able to return to mission readiness.
I was totally surprised by that too. My own experience with benzodiazepines, even just taken pre-MRI, etc, is such that I can't imagine being able to think as clearly or act as quickly. My foremost concern with the article is the safety of the soldiers.

I really like Gurnee, IL BTW. Six flags there is nice and I believe there's a restaurant called Saluto's that is awesome there.
Heh. If you lived in Gurnee you would loathe Six Flags. However, my family has been eating regularly at Saluto's for almost 20 years...you can't prefer Olive Garden after eating there :D
 

Passion4Sci

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I skimmed it real quick and did not see any mention of Ambien used in a combat zone. Psychiatric problems are nothing new for those serving in a war zone. I do not see why it would be a problem for those disorders to be treated the same as they would in the civilian world.
The Army estimates that authorized drug use splits roughly fifty-fifty between troops taking antidepressants — largely the class of drugs that includes Prozac and Zoloft — and those taking prescription sleeping pills like Ambien.
4th paragraph.

I do not see why it would be a problem for those disorders to be treated the same as they would in the civilian world.
In garrison, there's no problem with treating it just like it'd be treated in a "civilian world." But when deployed, you couldn't be further from a "civilian world." An entirely different ruleset applies when you take that convoy from Kuwait into Iraq. Or, for the lucky ones, the bird into Balad!