kmonte95

2+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2015
105
14
Jacksonville, Fl
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I feel like this may be a stupid question but please don't hate me for it! I'm pre-vet and I was just looking ahead into internships and residency's and I was just curious how they work? Would I be able to stay in my state which is Florida or would I be accepted into a certain program in any of the 50 states?
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
I feel like this may be a stupid question but please don't hate me for it! I'm pre-vet and I was just looking ahead into internships and residency's and I was just curious how they work? Would I be able to stay in my state which is Florida or would I be accepted into a certain program in any of the 50 states?
There's a system called the Veterinary Internship and Residency Matching Program (VIRMP). It's pretty confusing for me to understand the ranking/matching process, so hopefully someone who has gone through it can shed some light on it!

http://virmp.org/Home/VIRMPInfo?page=1
 

pirateyoho

Mizzou c/o 2019
7+ Year Member
Nov 23, 2010
216
95
Status
Veterinary Student
It's a matching program. So you'll rank your top choices (which I guess in your case would be ones in FL), and then cross your fingers that one of your top choices also ranked you as an applicant pretty high. It's supposed to help match up mutual interests. It reminds me a lot of the sorority recruitment process, actually, if that analogy helps at all haha.

Here's the example the VIRMP website gives:

By way of example, Metropolis University (MU) has four residencies available in surgery. MU received 22 applications, out of which it chose to rank 12 applicants. In effect, MU has offered jobs to applicants 1, 2, 3 and 4 on its list. Applicant 1 has Metropolis U ranked fourth, #2 has it ranked first, #3 ranked it second and #4 ranked it first. Metropolis would be matched with applicants #2 and #4 and nothing else would happen until applicants #1 and #3 are matched elsewhere, or the programs ranked higher than Metropolis on the applicant's lists were filled.
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
It's a matching program. So you'll rank your top choices (which I guess in your case would be ones in FL), and then cross your fingers that one of your top choices also ranked you as an applicant pretty high. It's supposed to help match up mutual interests. It reminds me a lot of the sorority recruitment process, actually, if that analogy helps at all haha.

Here's the example the VIRMP website gives:

By way of example, Metropolis University (MU) has four residencies available in surgery. MU received 22 applications, out of which it chose to rank 12 applicants. In effect, MU has offered jobs to applicants 1, 2, 3 and 4 on its list. Applicant 1 has Metropolis U ranked fourth, #2 has it ranked first, #3 ranked it second and #4 ranked it first. Metropolis would be matched with applicants #2 and #4 and nothing else would happen until applicants #1 and #3 are matched elsewhere, or the programs ranked higher than Metropolis on the applicant's lists were filled.
How exactly is rank determined? Experience, essays, CV, interviews?
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
Interviews are determined by who you know where, experience and CV. Rank has a lot more to do with how well you "fit" - how you mesh with the people, alignment of goals/interests.
How do they know how you "mesh?" Are you expected to visit during the application process?
 

that redhead

7+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2010
10,477
8,674
How do they know how you "mesh?" Are you expected to visit during the application process?
If they interview, you'll either be there in person or over Skype. If there are no interviews, they'll lean more heavily on things like letters/connections and goals/interests.
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
If they interview, you'll either be there in person or over Skype. If there are no interviews, they'll lean more heavily on things like letters/connections and goals/interests.
Gotcha, thanks! I'm trying not to get ahead of myself but sometimes thinking ahead can be good motivation.
 

Okimo

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2012
1,382
838
Status
Resident [Any Field]
You should 100% visit a place that you really want to go to before you rank it. It shows determination, forethought, and interest. At least, that's what I've been told for the area I hope to specialize in.
 

JaynaAli

Need it STAT or want it STAT? They're different.
5+ Year Member
Apr 22, 2013
1,988
3,671
Status
Veterinarian
Would I be able to stay in my state which is Florida or would I be accepted into a certain program in any of the 50 states?
You can not match to a program you don't rank (except for the scramble after match day but that's a different discussion). If you only want to do internships/residencies in Florida, you'd only rank Florida places. However, you aren't guaranteed to get a position through the match. Some people do not match anywhere, which is why some people apply to many programs. When applying, you'd have to decide if matching somewhere period was more important than staying in Florida. When I did the match last year, I ranked lots of places all over the country because even though I wanted to stay in the southern US, I wanted to match somewhere more because I needed an internship to do a future residency.
 

Okimo

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2012
1,382
838
Status
Resident [Any Field]
You can not match to a program you don't rank (except for the scramble after match day but that's a different discussion). If you only want to do internships/residencies in Florida, you'd only rank Florida places. However, you aren't guaranteed to get a position through the match. Some people do not match anywhere, which is why some people apply to many programs. When applying, you'd have to decide if matching somewhere period was more important than staying in Florida. When I did the match last year, I ranked lots of places all over the country because even though I wanted to stay in the southern US, I wanted to match somewhere more because I needed an internship to do a future residency.
I'm kind of in the same boat (or will be next year). Really desperately want to stay in Florida but would consider Texas if the boyfriend gets a job there as he's trying to do. Also, would highly prefer to match period rather than stay in Florida. How did you organize your list? Are there any small animal places you'd highly recommend in Florida?
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
While we're on the topic of matching: I think this has been briefly discussed before, but is it true that you are less likely to match at the school you got your DVM at?
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
Yes, yes, a thousand times yes If at all possible.
How early would you suggest we start scoping out places? My first year is obviously too soon, but I also don't want to miss the rush and wait too long. If it matters, I really only have 3 locations in mind as of now, so it's not like I'd be hitting all the schools in the country.
 

JaynaAli

Need it STAT or want it STAT? They're different.
5+ Year Member
Apr 22, 2013
1,988
3,671
Status
Veterinarian
How did you organize your list? Are there any small animal places you'd highly recommend in Florida?
I'm not from Florida, so no help there. Maybe Dy has better recommendations. I ranked 20 programs, which was way more than my intern mates did. (They ranked 8, 3, and 5 places). I had eight I really wanted and 12 I was okay with but didn't prefer. I ranked the top 8 by reputation of their clin path programs with places I'd visited ranked highest. The 12 I wasn't as interested I just ranked by location and average temperature because I really didn't have a strong opinion about them. I also know someone who ranked their less desired places based on their proximity to a Target and Trader Joes.
 

jmo1012

SGU (NCSU) c/o 2015!
7+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2011
3,453
1,330
Under the Sea
Status
Veterinarian
I'm kind of in the same boat (or will be next year). Really desperately want to stay in Florida but would consider Texas if the boyfriend gets a job there as he's trying to do. Also, would highly prefer to match period rather than stay in Florida. How did you organize your list? Are there any small animal places you'd highly recommend in Florida?
i am at a large private practice specialty referral in FL, message me if you want more info about the program. i also know a couple of SA people at other places in FL that may fit with what you're interested in.
While we're on the topic of matching: I think this has been briefly discussed before, but is it true that you are less likely to match at the school you got your DVM at?
varies greatly depending on the school (or even private institution). some schools are happy to have students become interns or residents. some people want all new people for their internship so that a broad array of mentorship is gained. some places like to keep interns for residents. it has been suggested to me to go to different places to train, simply because you will get a broader range of teaching and experience. i cant imagine staying at the same school for an internship, it would seem awkward to me! however, there is at least one person on here who is doing LA at their school as an intern now, and one of my classmates stayed on at her 4th year school to do a LA internship as weel and they are happy.
How early would you suggest we start scoping out places? My first year is obviously too soon, but I also don't want to miss the rush and wait too long. If it matters, I really only have 3 locations in mind as of now, so it's not like I'd be hitting all the schools in the country.
probably wouldnt start thinking about visiting until at least 3rd year, if not 4th year. remember, so many people come and go at many of these places, so unless you are just over the top amazing or terrible, visiting younger likely isn't going to get you any brownie points other than that you went. also, you'll be surprised how what you want and like changes over the years, so i wouldnt get to set on one thing or another for awhile. programs also change over the years. when i went to vet school, a local specialty clinic had an amazing internship. now? no way would i ever want to train there. its slow, they've cut the program way back, many of the clinicians have left, etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pinkpuppy9

JaynaAli

Need it STAT or want it STAT? They're different.
5+ Year Member
Apr 22, 2013
1,988
3,671
Status
Veterinarian
How early would you suggest we start scoping out places? My first year is obviously too soon, but I also don't want to miss the rush and wait too long. If it matters, I really only have 3 locations in mind as of now, so it's not like I'd be hitting all the schools in the country.
I visited one school's clin path department during spring break of 2nd year because I was already in the area for something else, but only for a single day. I feel like that was too early to really be beneficial and way too short of a trip to be meaningful. I loved it the single day I was there, but when I spent 2 weeks there during 4th year, I realized the program was not a good fit for me. I visited the clinic I am currently an intern at for a week during spring break of 3rd year. Obviously that worked out well for me, but I also visited with the intern director at another meeting 6 months later, which I think helped keep my name and face in the back of his mind. Sure, you make an impression when you first visit if you visit early (when I visited 2nd year they said things like my 1st yr friend and I were the youngest visitors they'd had), but there's so much time to be forgotten between an early visit and the match.

I also agree that visiting is vital if you are truly interested in a program. I think it's even more critical when you are an average to below average applicant. I don't think I would have matched where I did if I hadn't visited.
 
Last edited:

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
I visited one school's clin path department during spring break of 2nd year because I was already in the area for something else, but only for a single day. I feel like that was too early to really be beneficial and way too short of a trip to be meaningful. I loved it the single day I was there, but when I spent 2 weeks there during 4th year, I realized the program was not a good fit for me. I visited the clinic I am currently an intern at for a week during spring break of 3rd year. Obviously that worked out well for me, but I also visited with the intern director at another meeting 6 months later, which I think helped keep my name and face in the back of his mind. Sure, you make an impression when you first visit if you visit early (when I was at CSU they said things like my 1st yr friend and I were the youngest visitors they'd had), but there's so much time to be forgotten between an early visit and the match.

I also agree that visiting is vital if you are truly interested in a program. I think it's even more critical when you are an average to below average applicant. I don't think I would have matched where I did if I hadn't visited.
Do they typically allow visitors to shadow, then? Do they do working interviews to test your skill level?
 

JaynaAli

Need it STAT or want it STAT? They're different.
5+ Year Member
Apr 22, 2013
1,988
3,671
Status
Veterinarian
At the clinic I'm at now it was mostly shadowing/observation. I was expected to participate in rounds and got quizzed quite a bit when we were seeing patients, but other than restraint I didn't get to do much hands on. I did get to scrub into surgeries, but my view of the actual surgery was limited. The interns did all of the procedures and stuff.

For the clin path externships, I was treated like a mini-resident and got lots more hands-on. I was allowed to look at slides myself and write my own reports because I had quite a bit of cytology experience. The pathologist would then look at the slide with me and edit my report to give me feedback. One school even put my name on reports underneath theirs like gets done with records and discharge instructions, which was cool.
 

Minnerbelle

Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2009
5,263
3,063
Status
Veterinary Student
How early would you suggest we start scoping out places? My first year is obviously too soon, but I also don't want to miss the rush and wait too long. If it matters, I really only have 3 locations in mind as of now, so it's not like I'd be hitting all the schools in the country.
The later the better cause the earlier you go, the dumber you will be. And the more you'll know what you're looking for. Unless you are either standout or you develop a meaningful relationship with the attendings, no one is going to want to vouch for you on their end years later. If you go during your clinical year, they pay attention to you as someone to evaluate as a potential candidate for the year.
 
  • Like
Reactions: scb44f

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
The later the better cause the earlier you go, the dumber you will be. And the more you'll know what you're looking for. Unless you are either standout or you develop a meaningful relationship with the attendings, no one is going to want to vouch for you on their end years later. If you go during your clinical year, they pay attention to you as someone to evaluate as a potential candidate for the year.
Yeah, that's a good point. If they asked me any questions now, I'd reply with "Uhh.....I'm just a first year."
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
At the clinic I'm at now it was mostly shadowing/observation. I was expected to participate in rounds and got quizzed quite a bit when we were seeing patients, but other than restraint I didn't get to do much hands on. I did get to scrub into surgeries, but my view of the actual surgery was limited. The interns did all of the procedures and stuff.

For the clin path externships, I was treated like a mini-resident and got lots more hands-on. I was allowed to look at slides myself and write my own reports because I had quite a bit of cytology experience. The pathologist would then look at the slide with me and edit my report to give me feedback. One school even put my name on reports underneath theirs like gets done with records and discharge instructions, which was cool.
I'm thinking about my externships now, actually. Do you think doing an externship somewhere is a good way to get your foot in the door for a residency?
 

JaynaAli

Need it STAT or want it STAT? They're different.
5+ Year Member
Apr 22, 2013
1,988
3,671
Status
Veterinarian
I'm thinking about my externships now, actually. Do you think doing an externship somewhere is a good way to get your foot in the door for a residency?
It's just my opinion, but I think it's probably even more important to visit/extern somewhere for residencies than an internship, mainly because of the difference in time spent in each program. If I'm going to spend three years preparing for boards somewhere, it better be a place where I fit in well and the program fits with my needs/wants. Sure, you can read the VIRMP or website posting, but that just isn't the same as experiencing it. On the institution side, I imagine they'd rather take the person they at least have met before over an unknown, but that's why LORs are so important.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pinkpuppy9

scb44f

Llamas and cattle and sheep, oh my!
7+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2009
2,027
496
MO
Status
Veterinarian
however, there is at least one person on here who is doing LA at their school as an intern now, and one of my classmates stayed on at her 4th year school to do a LA internship as weel and they are happy.
The former would be me. I think the field you're interested in somewhat dictates whether or not you'll be ranked highly [at all] if you try to match at your own school (aside from the previously mentioned things that programs look for in house officers). For food animal specifically, there are so few people in the department that knowing the personality of the applicant goes a long way, and I probably wouldn't have been ranked if I'd wanted to do small animal here.

That said, one of the equine interns this year went away for a year to do her first surgery internship and is now back. The new equine resident graduated last year and went off site for a year too. And we have two first year onco residents, one of whom graduated here 2 years ago, while the other did an onco internship here 2 years ago. One of the SA surgery residents is also back after graduating and doing an internship elsewhere. The cardio resident graduated from here, did an internship at another school, and then came back for a Cardio internship before his residency started. I'm sure other programs have similar situations as well.

I'm not sure what you guys are interested in, but if anyone wants elaboration on food animal, I can tell you how one of my classmates and I approached the match.
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
I'm very interested in zoo as of now, but I'm not sure that we have any current/past zoo residents on here. Maybe we have some that are soon approaching the VIRMP?
 

cheathac

Purdue c/o 2021!!!
2+ Year Member
Apr 19, 2015
1,073
915
Status
Veterinary Student
Which specialties require an internship and which ones just require a 3 year residency?
 

pirateyoho

Mizzou c/o 2019
7+ Year Member
Nov 23, 2010
216
95
Status
Veterinary Student
I'm very interested in zoo as of now, but I'm not sure that we have any current/past zoo residents on here. Maybe we have some that are soon approaching the VIRMP?
Reading the bios of current ACZM diplomates can help give you an idea of some of the experiences/internships they did before getting matched for a residency: http://www.aczm.org/content.aspx?page_id=5&club_id=366916&item_id=18349

The zoo resident and ACZM diplomate I met during an undergrad internship were heavily involved in research prior to and during their residency, so that's a helpful tip to keep in mind. :) You need at least 5 publications to sit for boards, so (as you can tell from just the examples linked above) it's not unusual for aspiring zoo vets to obtain an advanced degree like a Master's or a PhD before trying to get matched for a zoo medicine residency. At the very least, try to find post-DVM internships that integrate plenty of research prior to applying to residency programs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pinkpuppy9

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
Reading the bios of current ACZM diplomates can help give you an idea of some of the experiences/internships they did before getting matched for a residency: http://www.aczm.org/content.aspx?page_id=5&club_id=366916&item_id=18349

The zoo resident and ACZM diplomate I met during an undergrad internship were heavily involved in research prior to and during their residency, so that's a helpful tip to keep in mind. :) You need at least 5 publications to sit for boards, so (as you can tell from just the examples linked above) it's not unusual for aspiring zoo vets to obtain an advanced degree like a Master's or a PhD before trying to get matched for a zoo medicine residency. At the very least, try to find post-DVM internships that integrate plenty of research prior to applying to residency programs.
I've gotten similar advice before! It was worded more like the institution you're at likes to see that they only have to find 2-3 projects for you to work on. Do published case write-ups count?
 

pirateyoho

Mizzou c/o 2019
7+ Year Member
Nov 23, 2010
216
95
Status
Veterinary Student
I've gotten similar advice before! It was worded more like the institution you're at likes to see that they only have to find 2-3 projects for you to work on. Do published case write-ups count?
4/5 can be case reports. 1 has to be an original investigation. All have to be published with the applicant as first author, and all have to have some relevance to zoo medicine.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/ClubExpressClubFiles/366916/documents/aczm_publication_requirements.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAIB6I23VLJX7E4J7Q&Expires=1441258349&response-content-disposition=inline; filename=aczm_publication_requirements.pdf&Signature=EeMVifjZmLtFfS7+gIsxYmSuzlk=
 
  • Like
Reactions: pinkpuppy9

Squeaksmom

3rd class semi-aquatic mammal
5+ Year Member
Mar 11, 2013
737
1,030
Status
Veterinary Student
I realize that I'm in second year and my interests may change. With that said, there's a speciality internship I really like the sound of at UC Davis, and I'd like to learn more about the program and see if it would be a good fit for me. Is there a way I can go about visiting? I may be mistaken, but I can't find anywhere saying they accept externs or anything like that.
 

Gwenevre

Pre-Nursing
5+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2014
5,584
5,994
Status
Non-Student
Which specialties require an internship and which ones just require a 3 year residency?
Typically, if you're going to specialize, you do the traditional 1 year internship and then the 3 year residency.
The only exception I know of is if you want to do Therio, you can go traditional or go straight into doing therio work for 6 years, then take boards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: cheathac

Okimo

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2012
1,382
838
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Typically, if you're going to specialize, you do the traditional 1 year internship and then the 3 year residency.
The only exception I know of is if you want to do Therio, you can go traditional or go straight into doing therio work for 6 years, then take boards.
There's a lot of exceptions. Lab animal, I think pathology is an exception, sports medicine and rehab... For most specialties you can do X amount of work in private practice and then take boards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gwenevre

Okimo

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2012
1,382
838
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I'm thinking about my externships now, actually. Do you think doing an externship somewhere is a good way to get your foot in the door for a residency?
Yes. That is how I have gotten to know places I want to be an intern or resident at. I don't think first year is too early but I think it's imperative that you keep those relationships open and current -- people are right in saying that you'll be forgotten otherwise. I did an externship after my first year of vet school that I think was helpful although I definitely felt a little dumb. For whatever it may count, they said I seemed to know a lot for a first year but I spent any down time reading up on the diseases they were seeing or surgeries they were performing. I'm in the progress of setting up another externship at that hospital.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pinkpuppy9

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
Thanks everyone! Appreciate you all. I'm really bad about maintaining connections, so that's probably going to be my first step. I'd like to extern where I worked like summer, so hopefully having already worked there will do me favors.
 
Jan 18, 2006
16,877
14,951
Status
Veterinarian
There's a lot of exceptions. Lab animal, I think pathology is an exception, sports medicine and rehab... For most specialties you can do X amount of work in private practice and then take boards.
Yeah, lab animal and path definitely are, because most of the stuff you would get experience in during a rotating internship isn't really applicable to what you would be doing in said residencies, so they don't require it. Instead there is more of a soft/unspoken requirement of other experience in the field (via externships and stuff), etc in order to be solidly competitive.
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
Typically, if you're going to specialize, you do the traditional 1 year internship and then the 3 year residency.
The only exception I know of is if you want to do Therio, you can go traditional or go straight into doing therio work for 6 years, then take boards.
Zoo is the same. I'm still unsure as to whether or not being boarding will start becoming an unspoken 'requirement' in order to be hired. It seems like it's shifting that way.
 

cheathac

Purdue c/o 2021!!!
2+ Year Member
Apr 19, 2015
1,073
915
Status
Veterinary Student
Thanks! I know I would like to specialize, just not sure what in. I have experience in pathology and just got hired as a lab animal caretaker so I'll get some experience on that side of it. Surgery interests me a lot though. I know that has to be a one year plus three year residency.
 

cheathac

Purdue c/o 2021!!!
2+ Year Member
Apr 19, 2015
1,073
915
Status
Veterinary Student
@DVMDream Oh wow, I didn't know the possible two years.. that's a long ways off but I love exploring the options.
 

orca2011

PennWe c/o 2016!!!
7+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2011
6,344
2,212
Rhode Island
Status
Veterinarian
There's a lot of exceptions. Lab animal, I think pathology is an exception, sports medicine and rehab... For most specialties you can do X amount of work in private practice and then take boards.
This process is a bit more than just x amount of work in private practice. You have to do like 2 peer reviewed papers and have a mentor in the same speciality you want to go into. I think the minimum amount of time for this whole process is like 5 years. I don't remember all the specifics, but I've talked to some clinicians who have chosen this route briefly as it may be something I consider down the road since I don't think I can afford a residency. Possibly an internship, but beyond that would realistically be a horrible financial decision for me. And the bf pretty much sounds like he might have a surgery residency lined up, which means I can't count on his income to support us.
 

Okimo

SDN Bronze Donor
Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2012
1,382
838
Status
Resident [Any Field]
This process is a bit more than just x amount of work in private practice. You have to do like 2 peer reviewed papers and have a mentor in the same speciality you want to go into. I think the minimum amount of time for this whole process is like 5 years. I don't remember all the specifics, but I've talked to some clinicians who have chosen this route briefly as it may be something I consider down the road since I don't think I can afford a residency. Possibly an internship, but beyond that would realistically be a horrible financial decision for me. And the bf pretty much sounds like he might have a surgery residency lined up, which means I can't count on his income to support us.
You're right. Sorry, I was oversimplifying. Most of these specialties that allow you to skip the intern years still require a substantial amount of work -- not just a certain number of years in practice. For anyone who wants to look it up, you can usually go to the college's website and find the details :) I haven't looked into it much because surgery didn't offer that option last time I checked and I'm not interested in it.
 

shortnsweet

Just Keep Swimming
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2008
5,200
1,181
Resident-Land
Status
Veterinarian
The former would be me. I think the field you're interested in somewhat dictates whether or not you'll be ranked highly [at all] if you try to match at your own school (aside from the previously mentioned things that programs look for in house officers). For food animal specifically, there are so few people in the department that knowing the personality of the applicant goes a long way, and I probably wouldn't have been ranked if I'd wanted to do small animal here.

That said, one of the equine interns this year went away for a year to do her first surgery internship and is now back. The new equine resident graduated last year and went off site for a year too. And we have two first year onco residents, one of whom graduated here 2 years ago, while the other did an onco internship here 2 years ago. One of the SA surgery residents is also back after graduating and doing an internship elsewhere. The cardio resident graduated from here, did an internship at another school, and then came back for a Cardio internship before his residency started. I'm sure other programs have similar situations as well.

I'm not sure what you guys are interested in, but if anyone wants elaboration on food animal, I can tell you how one of my classmates and I approached the match.
Aw and I know everyone you're talking about.

They kicked me out of the nest, but it's worked out for the best ;)
 

shortnsweet

Just Keep Swimming
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2008
5,200
1,181
Resident-Land
Status
Veterinarian
Zoo is the same. I'm still unsure as to whether or not being boarding will start becoming an unspoken 'requirement' in order to be hired. It seems like it's shifting that way.
All of my friends who want to do zoo have done at least two internships, usually one large, one small. My internmate from last year did food animal last year and is doing a zoo internship this year. And all of the zoo vets I worked with when I had a job at a zoo were boarded...and that was when I was back in undergrad. I don't think it is "shifting" that way...it's been that way.
 

jmo1012

SGU (NCSU) c/o 2015!
7+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2011
3,453
1,330
Under the Sea
Status
Veterinarian
I realize that I'm in second year and my interests may change. With that said, there's a speciality internship I really like the sound of at UC Davis, and I'd like to learn more about the program and see if it would be a good fit for me. Is there a way I can go about visiting? I may be mistaken, but I can't find anywhere saying they accept externs or anything like that.
a specialty internship should be a back up plan because you dont match for a residency, not a goal. yes, specialty internships are becoming the norm, but what it gets you is an extra year of poor pay before having a "real" job.

Zoo is the same. I'm still unsure as to whether or not being boarding will start becoming an unspoken 'requirement' in order to be hired. It seems like it's shifting that way.
you need 5 publications to sit for zoo boards, and that is extremely challenging to do without a residency fyi (having talked to a couple of vets doing it that way - they have been working at it for years. its hard to get 5 publications during a residency, let alone on your own without institutional backing)

And sometimes it ends up being a 2 year internship and 3 year residency. It is a very competitive specialty to get into.
or 3+ years of internship :-/ i knew a neurologist that did 3 or 4 back several years ago when a specialty internship was uncommon, and our ophtho specialty intern is now doing a 2nd ophtho internship (for 3 years of internship) because she didnt match this year... :(
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rwwilliams

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
a specialty internship should be a back up plan because you dont match for a residency, not a goal. yes, specialty internships are becoming the norm, but what it gets you is an extra year of poor pay before having a "real" job.


you need 5 publications to sit for zoo boards, and that is extremely challenging to do without a residency fyi (having talked to a couple of vets doing it that way - they have been working at it for years. its hard to get 5 publications during a residency, let alone on your own without institutional backing)


or 3+ years of internship :-/ i knew a neurologist that did 3 or 4 back several years ago when a specialty internship was uncommon, and our ophtho specialty intern is now doing a 2nd ophtho internship (for 3 years of internship) because she didnt match this year... :(
Yeah I can definitely seeing it as being tough. However, I know a few unboarded zoo vets who have tons of publications from the zoos they're at now. I guess they sort of got grandfathered in if that makes sense. They entered the scene before being boarded was becoming more and more of an expectation for the bigger zoos. They could easily sit for boards at this point, but I know one said she knows she'd need to study for it (not that I assumed it'd be easy or anything, but it goes to show you that 20 years of experience won't guarantee test performance, lol).