Interview Advice from a Current Student

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Affiche

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Hey all!

It was about this time last year (give or take a week or two) that I received my first II. @Goro has posted an excellent amount of advice on this forum, which helped me tremendously last year, but I'd like to add on to that advice and give you some tips from a student's perspective. Here goes:

- Treat everyone with the utmost respect, regardless of who they are. I got lost at my first interview and had to ask a kind lady for directions near the entrance of the school. She told me she works in the med school library and had to go my direction anyway, so she could walk me to where I needed to be. She ended up being my interviewer, not the librarian I thought she was lol. Be polite and kind to everyone you meet!
- Culture yourself before you open your mouth. If you can't get cultured, get a filter. The URM kid in your interview group isn't less deserving to be there than you and he/she isn't stealing your seat. The disadvantaged kid isn't playing up a sob story to get a leg up on you. If you don't like the admissions process, keep quiet about it, because you don't know who is listening and you don't know who you're offending. I ended up hearing plenty of kids mention at interview day that they didn't have "some sob story" working for their application so they were the real disadvantaged ones. As someone who was disadvantaged, I mentally categorized this applicant as an dingus and watched as he proceeded to offend a number of other people throughout the day. Bad move! Don't be that person if you want an acceptance.
- Read the interview feedback comments on this forum. To prepare for my interviews, I browsed the commonly asked questions for the school about 4-5 days in advance. They're usually very accurate! I didn't rehearse answers, but I got a general idea of what I wanted to discuss. If you know what you want to talk about, you can come up with an appropriate response to each question that focuses on that subject. This allows you control over the conversation which means you have control over your interview. I ended up being able to tell my interviewers exactly what I wanted them to know about me without it seeming forced, and I was accepted to every school I interviewed at. Focus on your strengths and don't wing it, because you'll get nervous and blank if you aren't prepared.
- Stay with student hosts if you're able to. I was too broke to stay in hotels for almost all of my interviews, so I ended up emailing schools and asking for a host even if it wasn't advertised. It usually worked out in my favor. Hosts are great resources for dishing all the pros and cons to their program. Don't offer the hosts money, because that's weird, but a gift from home (if you're OOS) or a gift card to a local coffee shop/restaurant will be much appreciated.
- Be social! Your nerves will be going crazy until you sit down with your interview group and start chatting. Everyone is stressed, but you're all going through the same stress together. Ask about where other people are from and what their favorite part of the day has been. Whatever. Just chat and make friends, because it will calm your nerves and allow you to enjoy the day.
- Don't talk about numbers with other applicants. Ever. It's completely inappropriate to talk about your MCAT or gpa. Don't do it. If someone asks where else you've interviewed, it's fine to tell them, but don't announce to the whole room how many interviews you've had. There will be someone in the room who's interviewed more than you and someone who is currently sitting in their only interview offer for the season. Be sensitive and don't brag.
- Let your student tour guide eat his lunch! At every single one of my interviews, the tour guide was bombarded with so many questions throughout lunch that he/she barely got to eat. Definitely ask your questions, but if you notice his plate is still untouched feel free to say, "sorry! last question and then we'll let you eat your food!" so that people get the picture. There will be enough time for questions that you can afford the poor kid a few minutes to eat his free food, which is the whole reason he's there to begin with.
- Get your interviewer's name and write it down. I was terrible at this. I would be so focused on my interview that I would completely forget my interviewer's name, making thank you cards impossible. I even called one of the schools after my interview to get the name of my interviewer. Try not to forget, but if you do, it's not a big deal. It will definitely save you stress if you remember to write the name down, but the admissions office is used to getting calls requesting interviewer names from forgetful applicants. Further, if you forget to write a thank you card, don't sweat it. It plays no role in your admissions decision and most schools just toss them anyway. A nice gesture, but not necessary at all.
- Feel free to bring a granola bar or quick snack. Sometimes lunch is served late and you don't want to get hangry while you're trying to enjoy the school! There's usually a tour just before lunch and that's a good time to munch on your snack. It's almost always a tour led by current students and they will encourage you to feel comfortable eating whatever you brought. Protip: don't bring a chocolate covered anything because you risk getting melted chocolate on your suit ;)
- Ladies, bring mole skin! Those tours can be a nightmare if your heels are new or not built for power walking around a hospital. Even if they are, bring moleskin! I kept a pack of pre-cut strips in my portfolio and slipped into the bathroom to apply as needed. It was a lifesaver! I was also able to help a few girls out on the interview trail, who were very grateful indeed.
- Bring a breath mint for before your interview. The post-lunch interview can leave you self-conscious if you're a serious foodie. I went HAM on some Indian food at one of my interview days and had an interview immediately after lunch. Two Altoids did the trick, but I would have otherwise felt completely uncomfortable speaking in such close quarters after demolishing some yummy curry.
- Lay off the cologne or perfume. The deodorant is a must, but the heavy scents should be left at home. No one wants to get a headache from whatever you sprayed on yourself that morning.
- Have fun! You've taken the MCAT, slaved over your primary, stressed about LORs and puttered through secondaries. Interviewing is the fun part of applying! The school is trying to advertise themselves just as you are, so listen up to what they have to say and take notes. Further, make a pros and cons list about each school the evening of your interview. You may not be deciding on a school for 6-7 more months, so those lists are invaluable when you look back and have reminders about all the things you liked/disliked.
- Relax. You can't do anything after your interview day. You'll be tempted to stalk the school's SDN thread and try to figure out the "system" of how/when you'll find out. There is no system to decode. Wait patiently for the school to get back to you. The best thing you can do for yourself post-interviews is to pursue hobbies and enjoy life as if you're not in the middle of a very stressful application cycle. Easier said than done, but worth doing.
 
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Chromium Surfer

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Thanks for this! I hope your M1 year goes great! :)
 
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Goro

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If I could give this a thousand likes, I would!


Hey all!

It was about this time last year (give or take a week or two) that I received my first II. @Goro has posted an excellent amount of advice on this forum, which helped me tremendously last year, but I'd like to add on to that advice and give you some tips from a student's perspective. Here goes:

- Treat everyone with the utmost respect, regardless of who they are. I got lost at my first interview and had to ask a kind lady for directions near the entrance of the school. She told me she works in the med school library and had to go my direction anyway, so she could walk me to where I needed to be. She ended up being my interviewer, not the librarian I thought she was lol. Be polite and kind to everyone you meet!
- Culture yourself before you open your mouth. If you can't get cultured, get a filter. The URM kid in your interview group isn't less deserving to be there than you and he/she isn't stealing your seat. The disadvantaged kid isn't playing up a sob story to get a leg up on you. If you don't like the admissions process, keep quiet about it, because you don't know who is listening and you don't know who you're offending. I ended up hearing plenty of kids mention at interview day that they didn't have "some sob story" working for their application so they were the real disadvantaged ones. As someone who was disadvantaged, I mentally categorized this applicant as an dingus and watched as he proceeded to offend a number of other people throughout the day. Bad move! Don't be that person if you want an acceptance.
- Read the interview feedback comments on this forum. To prepare for my interviews, I browsed the commonly asked questions for the school about 4-5 days in advance. They're usually very accurate! I didn't rehearse answers, but I got a general idea of what I wanted to discuss. If you know what you want to talk about, you can come up with an appropriate response to each question that focuses on that subject. This allows you control over the conversation which means you have control over your interview. I ended up being able to tell my interviewers exactly what I wanted them to know about me without it seeming forced, and I was accepted to every school I interviewed at. Focus on your strengths and don't wing it, because you'll get nervous and blank if you aren't prepared.
- Stay with student hosts if you're able to. I was too broke to stay in hotels for almost all of my interviews, so I ended up emailing schools and asking for a host even if it wasn't advertised. It usually worked out in my favor. Hosts are great resources for dishing all the pros and cons to their program. Don't offer the hosts money, because that's weird, but a gift from home (if you're OOS) or a gift card to a local coffee shop/restaurant will be much appreciated.
- Be social! Your nerves will be going crazy until you sit down with your interview group and start chatting. Everyone is stressed, but you're all going through the same stress together. Ask about where other people are from and what their favorite part of the day has been. Whatever. Just chat and make friends, because it will calm your nerves and allow you to enjoy the day.
- Don't talk about numbers with other applicants. Ever. It's completely inappropriate to talk about your MCAT or gpa. Don't do it. If someone asks where else you've interviewed, it's fine to tell them, but don't announce to the whole room how many interviews you've had. There will be someone in the room who's interviewed more than you and someone who is currently sitting in their only interview offer for the season. Be sensitive and don't brag.
- Let your student tour guide eat his lunch! At every single one of my interviews, the tour guide was bombarded with so many questions throughout lunch that he/she barely got to eat. Definitely ask your questions, but if you notice his plate is still untouched feel free to say, "sorry! last question and then we'll let you eat your food!" so that people get the picture. There will be enough time for questions that you can afford the poor kid a few minutes to eat his free food, which is the whole reason he's there to begin with.
- Get your interviewer's name and write it down. I was terrible at this. I would be so focused on my interview that I would completely forget my interviewer's name, making thank you cards impossible. I even called one of the schools after my interview to get the name of my interviewer. Try not to forget, but if you do, it's not a big deal. It will definitely save you stress if you remember to write the name down, but the admissions office is used to getting calls requesting interviewer names from forgetful applicants. Further, if you forget to write a thank you card, don't sweat it. It plays no role in your admissions decision and most schools just toss them anyway. A nice gesture, but not necessary at all.
- Feel free to bring a granola bar or quick snack. Sometimes lunch is served late and you don't want to get hangry while you're trying to enjoy the school! There's usually a tour just before lunch and that's a good time to munch on your snack. It's almost always a tour led by current students and they will encourage you to feel comfortable eating whatever you brought. Protip: don't bring a chocolate covered anything because you risk getting melted chocolate on your suit ;)
- Ladies, bring mole skin! Those tours can be a nightmare if your heels are new or not built for power walking around a hospital. Even if they are, bring moleskin! I kept a pack of pre-cut strips in my portfolio and slipped into the bathroom to apply as needed. It was a lifesaver! I was also able to help a few girls out on the interview trail, who were very grateful indeed.
- Bring a breath mint for before your interview. The post-lunch interview can leave you self-conscious if you're a serious foodie. I went HAM on some Indian food at one of my interview days and had an interview immediately after lunch. Two Altoids did the trick, but I would have otherwise felt completely uncomfortable speaking in such close quarters after demolishing some yummy curry.
- Lay off the cologne or perfume. The deodorant is a must, but the heavy scents should be left at home. No one wants to get a headache from whatever you sprayed on yourself that morning.
- Have fun! You've taken the MCAT, slaved over your primary, stressed about LORs and puttered through secondaries. Interviewing is the fun part of applying! The school is trying to advertise themselves just as you are, so listen up to what they have to say and take notes. Further, make a pros and cons list about each school the evening of your interview. You may not be deciding on a school for 6-7 more months, so those lists are invaluable when you look back and have reminders about all the things you liked/disliked.
- Relax. You can't do anything after your interview day. You'll be tempted to stalk the school's SDN thread and try to figure out the "system" of how/when you'll find out. There is no system to decode. Wait patiently for the school to get back to you. The best thing you can do for yourself post-interviews is to pursue hobbies and enjoy life as if you're not in the middle of a very stressful application cycle. Easier said than done, but worth doing.
 
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DokterMom

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I ended up being able to tell my interviewers exactly what I wanted them to know about me without it seeming forced, and I was accepted to every school I interviewed at. Focus on your strengths and don't wing it, because you'll get nervous and blank if you aren't prepared.

Fabulous post with lots of excellent advice! In support of that, I'm repeating this for those who might otherwise downplay this excellent advice --
 
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Affiche

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Oh, and I forgot something incredibly important! As Goro says, you are also interviewing the school, which means you should be asking questions about the program that will help you decide if it's one you want to invest in. That said, most pre-meds focus on very unimportant details and never ask the important questions.

Here are some things you should be asking about (hint: the focus is on clinical years):
- Do students feel like an active part of the team during their rotations? This question is best for MS4s. Are students mostly shadowing (bad), or actually assisting?
- What kind of "scut" work is there and how much of it are students doing on rotations? Consulting patients and wheeling them around is "good scut", but being a fax mule is "bad scut".
- Are there scheduled electives during 3rd year, or are they only available 4th year?
- Are there mandatory away rotations? If you're near family/married, this can be hard.
- Are students getting clinical experience in both community and university hospitals?
- How are rotations graded? Is there a standardized grading rubric?
- Is there a limit on how many students can earn honors in each rotation?
- Is location of rotations up to a lottery?

Less important:
- Are classes mandatory? Mandatory lecture can be a time waste and prevent you from actively pursuing ECs. If lecture works for you, great, but it's nice to have the choice to not attend too.
- How heavily does the curriculum emphasize PBL and/or TBL? Depending on a your learning style, a curriculum that emphasizes this type of learning could be your best friend or worst nightmare.

Not important:
- Pass/Fail curriculum. Even schools who have P/F will still internally rank, so there is still external pressure to perform well. A better question would be to ask about the competitiveness of the school. Can you only score honors if you're in the top 10 percent? Does anyone who scores 90% or above earn honors? Is High Pass part of the grading? True P/F is nice, but I personally wouldn't choose a school based on their pre-clinical grading scheme.
- Step 1 score. If you are attending an LCME accredited school, how you perform on Step 1 is not dependent on which program you attend.
- Match list. Someone told me that reading a match list is like reading tea leaves. You can't possibly make good sense of what you're seeing, so don't even try to extract information out of a school's match list. For some newer schools, it may be helpful to see if students are getting into competitive specialties or higher ranked programs, but beyond that I can't recommend using a match list to gain information about the school.
 
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On student hosts, I found that the one that I did stay with was really fun (the guys were cool to hang out with), but the sleeping situation wasn't great, and I didn't want to risk not sleeping/being prepped, so I used hotels in the future. Of course, it's also a financial decision, as hotels can run your application budget up tremendously. There were other intangible benefits to staying with student hosts, like the psychological benefit of knowing some people, albeit very briefly, in a foreign city.
 
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Goro

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I am so stealing this for my "guide to your interview questions"!!

Oh, and I forgot something incredibly important! As Goro says, you are also interviewing the school, which means you should be asking questions about the program that will help you decide if it's one you want to invest in. That said, most pre-meds focus on very unimportant details and never ask the important questions.

Here are some things you should be asking about (hint: the focus is on clinical years):
- Do students feel like an active part of the team during their rotations? This question is best for MS4s. Are students mostly shadowing (bad), or actually assisting?
- What kind of "scut" work is there and how much of it are students doing on rotations? Consulting patients and wheeling them around is "good scut", but being a fax mule is "bad scut".
- Are there scheduled electives during 3rd year, or are they only available 4th year?
- Are there mandatory away rotations? If you're near family/married, this can be hard.
- Are students getting clinical experience in both community and university hospitals?
- How are rotations graded? Is there a standardized grading rubric?
- Is there a limit on how many students can earn honors in each rotation?
- Is location of rotations up to a lottery?

Less important:
- Are classes mandatory? Mandatory lecture can be a time waste and prevent you from actively pursuing ECs. If lecture works for you, great, but it's nice to have the choice to not attend too.
- How heavily does the curriculum emphasize PBL and/or TBL? Depending on a your learning style, a curriculum that emphasizes this type of learning could be your best friend or worst nightmare.

Not important:
- Pass/Fail curriculum. Even schools who have P/F will still internally rank, so there is still external pressure to perform well. A better question would be to ask about the competitiveness of the school. Can you only score honors if you're in the top 10 percent? Does anyone who scores 90% or above earn honors? Is High Pass part of the grading? True P/F is nice, but I personally wouldn't choose a school based on their pre-clinical grading scheme.
- Step 1 score. If you are attending an LCME accredited school, how you perform on Step 1 is not dependent on which program you attend.
- Match list. Someone told me that reading a match list is like reading tea leaves. You can't possibly make good sense of what you're seeing, so don't even try to extract information out of a school's match list. For some newer schools, it may be helpful to see if students are getting into competitive specialties or higher ranked programs, but beyond that I can't recommend using a match list to gain information about the school.
 
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musicalfeet

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On student hosts, I found that the one that I did stay with was really fun (the guys were cool to hang out with), but the sleeping situation wasn't great, and I didn't want to risk not sleeping/being prepped, so I used hotels in the future. Of course, it's also a financial decision, as hotels can run your application budget up tremendously. There were other intangible benefits to staying with student hosts, like the psychological benefit of knowing some people, albeit very briefly, in a foreign city.

I'm usually a lot more on edge (although I think I do a good job of hiding it) when I'm around people I don't know, so student hosts would just make things a lot more stressful. BUT the one time I did stay with someone (I had trouble sleeping), I fell asleep during the financial aid talks during my interview so....personally it didn't work out for me at all.
 

I'm No Superman

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I would only add one thing to this wonderful guide: PRACTICE.

I did not practice, and the difference between my first interview and my last one were night and day. Use your university's career center, friends, parents, parent's friends, professors that interview for med/grad school that you interact with, etc.
 
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A few points:

@Affiche 's points about not offending fellow interviewees --> if you're accepted, you might be surprised to find that some of them are now your classmates cuz they got accepted too! You don't want to create enemies for PBL and small group sessions and ppl who want to throw you under the bus 3rd yr before you've even started!

In fact, because of this phenomenon of being nice and then seeing people again, I already had acquaintances day 1 of orientation! cool! they ended being a friend the rest of med school

About the altoids - it's good to have something to pick your teeth with or a mirror in case something gets stuck from lunch!!!!

Only thing I slightly disagree, don't try to control the interview too much.
I've said it elsewhere. A great deal of my interviews, the interviewers hijacked it to talk about themselves! That's OK.
They had my app, my PS was my life story, they must have felt they already knew me in some fashion and I must have had that quality that made them open up and enjoy talking to me about themselves! That's a great skill for a future doc.
So don't tread on their enjoyment of the conversation or fret too much if they seem to enjoy talking about themselves.
We like people more for how they make us feel about ourselves, and people love to talk about themselves, and people rate liking people who are good listeners for that quality more than any other thing about them.

So review body language and other tips that can show you're a great listener and good at drawing people out.
 
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Have to agree with the post above on the note that interviewers do tend to 'hijack' the topic of conversations towards themselves. If you're able to contribute to what they are discussing it can help you.
Most of my interviews at medical schools for certain programs revolved primarily around topics outside of medicine and just having a normal conversation with the interviewer. Several of my interviewers even pointed out that I was well-read, so it helped.
I feel as though keeping up to date with current events will help as that was a recurring theme in their questions/discussion.
(thought I would put my two cents in)
 
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Affiche

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Only thing I slightly disagree, don't try to control the interview too much.
I've said it elsewhere. A great deal of my interviews, the interviewers hijacked it to talk about themselves! That's OK.
They had my app, my PS was my life story, they must have felt they already knew me in some fashion and I must have had that quality that made them open up and enjoy talking to me about themselves! That's a great skill for a future doc.
So don't tread on their enjoyment of the conversation or fret too much if they seem to enjoy talking about themselves.
We like people more for how they make us feel about ourselves, and people love to talk about themselves, and people rate liking people who are good listeners for that quality more than any other thing about them.
I agree that you shouldn't try to control the interview too much, which is what my post was supposed to project. The control part comes from how you respond to the questions you are asked. Let me clarify with an example:

I really wanted to discuss my family's multicultural background in my interviews, if possible. Surprisingly, this was one area that my application barely touched on because it was more focused on other experiences, but something that was important to me. Instead of waiting for questions that directly asked me what kind of experience with other cultures I had (they would never come), I looked at the interview feedback forum and prepared answers to some of the questions, which allowed me to work this topic into the conversation without it seeming forced. Some examples of this:

I: "Tell me about a time when you learned to compromise?"
Me: Discussed figuring out how to handle holidays when my maternal and paternal families were of very different, and very clashing, religions.

or

I: Tell me about something that you are most proud of?
Me: Discussed being able to maintain strong familial relationships between a maternal and paternal family whose countries hate each other.

The above responses were much stronger answers than the crap I would have spit out about compromising in a group project or being proud of passing orgo.

If your interviewer talks about how much he hates the ACA and never asks you a question about it, that's okay (that happened to me). But, you should have a pretty good idea of how you want to respond to questions before you walk into the interview room, and that's what I mean by having some "control". Even when all my interviewer did was blab about his hatred of the ACA, he still asked me 1-2 questions in the beginning, much less than any other interview but enough for me to focus on what I wanted to focus on before he hi-jacked the conversation.
 
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toutou

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Thanks for this! I always love reading these tips and have been preparing myself with these recommendations. My biggest problem is my face. I can have severe resting bitch face especially when I am thinking or when I'm really focused on something. In unfamiliar social events I try to smile more often and catch myself from going into one of those facial expression, which I'm so scared of giving people the wrong idea.
 

Affiche

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Thanks for this! I always love reading these tips and have been preparing myself with these recommendations. My biggest problem is my face. I can have severe resting bitch face especially when I am thinking or when I'm really focused on something. In unfamiliar social events I try to smile more often and catch myself from going into one of those facial expression, which I'm so scared of giving people the wrong idea.
Everyone else will be so nervous and self-conscious about their own RBF that they won't realize yours. Most of interview day is filled with talking to people/being engaged conversationally, so you won't have much RBF going on if you're receptive to conversing with your peers. Your interview will go by very quickly and you'll be chatting the whole time, so don't worry about that either.
 

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I'm usually a lot more on edge (although I think I do a good job of hiding it) when I'm around people I don't know, so student hosts would just make things a lot more stressful. BUT the one time I did stay with someone (I had trouble sleeping), I fell asleep during the financial aid talks during my interview so....personally it didn't work out for me at all.
Well to be fair, I'm pretty sure that financial aid talks are actually designed to test your abilities to stay awake. Woe is the interviewee who has their interviews after the financial aid talks. Interview days are incredibly exhausting...
 
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Mansamusa

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Oh, and I forgot something incredibly important! As Goro says, you are also interviewing the school, which means you should be asking questions about the program that will help you decide if it's one you want to invest in. That said, most pre-meds focus on very unimportant details and never ask the important questions.

Here are some things you should be asking about (hint: the focus is on clinical years):
- Do students feel like an active part of the team during their rotations? This question is best for MS4s. Are students mostly shadowing (bad), or actually assisting?
- What kind of "scut" work is there and how much of it are students doing on rotations? Consulting patients and wheeling them around is "good scut", but being a fax mule is "bad scut".
- Are there scheduled electives during 3rd year, or are they only available 4th year?
- Are there mandatory away rotations? If you're near family/married, this can be hard.
- Are students getting clinical experience in both community and university hospitals?
- How are rotations graded? Is there a standardized grading rubric?
- Is there a limit on how many students can earn honors in each rotation?
- Is location of rotations up to a lottery?

Less important:
- Are classes mandatory? Mandatory lecture can be a time waste and prevent you from actively pursuing ECs. If lecture works for you, great, but it's nice to have the choice to not attend too.
- How heavily does the curriculum emphasize PBL and/or TBL? Depending on a your learning style, a curriculum that emphasizes this type of learning could be your best friend or worst nightmare.

Not important:
- Pass/Fail curriculum. Even schools who have P/F will still internally rank, so there is still external pressure to perform well. A better question would be to ask about the competitiveness of the school. Can you only score honors if you're in the top 10 percent? Does anyone who scores 90% or above earn honors? Is High Pass part of the grading? True P/F is nice, but I personally wouldn't choose a school based on their pre-clinical grading scheme.
- Step 1 score. If you are attending an LCME accredited school, how you perform on Step 1 is not dependent on which program you attend.
- Match list. Someone told me that reading a match list is like reading tea leaves. You can't possibly make good sense of what you're seeing, so don't even try to extract information out of a school's match list. For some newer schools, it may be helpful to see if students are getting into competitive specialties or higher ranked programs, but beyond that I can't recommend using a match list to gain information about the school.
I would also add stop asking how many people to a body in anatomy just because google said that is a good question to ask. Ask the modality of teaching (dissection, prosection, virtual, etc) if anything because you likely won't decide which med school based on such a small factor.

Basically, ask questions that would help you choose between schools and not just for the sake of asking them. And don't feel like you have to ask the guides questions if don't really have any.

That would also help for your "allow the tour guides the chance to eat during lunch" point. Half the questions asked during lunch were "what do you do for fun? How many hours do you study?" questions that had nothing to with the school. Save these questions for when you have time to make light conversation with the guide
 
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mmm_cats

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Can't find the 'Interview Feedback' threads. Are they just the 'X school 2016-2017 Application' threads?
 

Vrachika

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Would not have thought about the moleskin, emergency granola bar or breath mints. GREAT ideas!! I will definitely have some of those with me interview day. I hardly ever wear heels so no doubt i will need the moleskin! I'll also make sure my tour guide gets to eat lunch ;)

Thanks so much for this post!!
 
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rolliespring

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Giving this a bump. Thank you OP for your thoughtful advice!
 

kegar99

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Can't find the 'Interview Feedback' threads. Are they just the 'X school 2016-2017 Application' threads?
At the very top of the SDN page, there is a link that says 'Interview Feedback'. Then search for the school you want info on. Probably the most useful feature is the list of interview questions that people have been asked at that school.
 
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Green_Goose

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What countries are your parents from? Are you brown? Your life sounds kind of cool actually
 
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