• SDN Site Updates

    Hey everyone! The site will be down for approximately 2 hours on Thursday, August 5th for site updates.

CraveMyThoughts

New Member
Apr 19, 2012
6
0
Status (Visible)
Hi all!

I'm fairly new to this board (as in today lol) and have already found it to be a wonderful resource on my journey to PhD Clinical Psychology. Anyway, I have an interview tomorrow at a Psychiatric Hospital and I have absolutely NO idea what to expect :cool:. In the email, I was told "
.We are currently in the process of interviewing for our internship and/or practicum positions for the summer and fall semesters. You are receiving this email because you have expressed interest in our program in the past through sending us your resume."

What kinds of questions are typical for these internships? One question that always STUMPS me at interviews is the strengths/weaknesses question, ugh any tips? My boss helped me come up with a general question that I hope is effective.

Anyway, any other tips, tricks, or anything else would be great. Thanks!:D

.
 

erg923

Regional Clinical Officer, Centene Corporation
10+ Year Member
Apr 6, 2007
10,372
4,782
Status (Visible)
  1. Psychologist
The strengths and weakness question is always important for me. If a person has no insight into what they do well and what they do not so well, i would seriously question their ability to engage in appopriate clinical work/conduct.

Otherwise, you should ask them question that you feel are important. Obviously, what will i do here, how much supervision is offered, expectations, etc.
 
Last edited:

thewesternsky

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Jan 30, 2007
785
77
Status (Visible)
  1. Post Doc
Note to others reading this thread: the OP is currently in undergrad, so this would be a regular volunteer-type position rather than an official graduate school external practicum... I started writing a post with the latter in mind and then realized my mistake.

Erg had some good advice. You'll likely be asked why you want the position, and what other volunteer or work experiences you've had. You might be asked situation-type questions, like how you would resolve a conflict or how you might respond to certain things that might come up in the hospital setting. Re: the strengths and weaknesses question, do some reflection about yourself and be honest. If you want to run ideas by the forum, I think we can give you feedback or suggestions. One way to answer the weakness question is to talk about how you have limited experience in X area, and that you'd really like to further develop in that area through Y and Z at the site.
 
About the Ads

CraveMyThoughts

New Member
Apr 19, 2012
6
0
Status (Visible)
Thanks for the response Erg! I'll work on on a good response to the weakness/strength question.

Yes, as thewesternsky stated I'm currently in undergrad, sorry for the confusion! Although, in the email she also mentioned that this would be an internship and/or practicum opportunity. So I'm not sure what she meant, seeing as I have 1 more semester of undergrad left.

As far as the weakness question, my boss suggested that I say something like: "I have the tendency to to take on too many projects and maybe stretch myself too thin, such as when I worked at a bank (I was a teller), took 16 hours of classes, and on the exec board of different clubs." Then I could turn it into a positive saying that this shows that I am ambitious and like to take the initiative on things! I thought that sounded pretty good, so I was going to use it tomorrow. What do you all think? Thanks.
 

erg923

Regional Clinical Officer, Centene Corporation
10+ Year Member
Apr 6, 2007
10,372
4,782
Status (Visible)
  1. Psychologist
Thanks for the response Erg! I'll work on on a good response to the weakness/strength question.

Yes, as thewesternsky stated I'm currently in undergrad, sorry for the confusion! Although, in the email she also mentioned that this would be an internship and/or practicum opportunity. So I'm not sure what she meant, seeing as I have 1 more semester of undergrad left.

As far as the weakness question, my boss suggested that I say something like: "I have the tendency to to take on too many projects and maybe stretch myself too thin, such as when I worked at a bank (I was a teller), took 16 hours of classes, and on the exec board of different clubs." Then I could turn it into a positive saying that this shows that I am ambitious and like to take the initiative on things! I thought that sounded pretty good, so I was going to use it tomorrow. What do you all think? Thanks.

Eh, if you do that, then fine. But dont make it up. be carefull about putting too much postive spin on it. Be honest. I weakness is a weakness. We all have them. Dont hide it.
 

Pragma

Neuropsychologist
7+ Year Member
Dec 29, 2011
3,309
712
Status (Visible)
  1. Psychologist
Thanks for the response Erg! I'll work on on a good response to the weakness/strength question.

Yes, as thewesternsky stated I'm currently in undergrad, sorry for the confusion! Although, in the email she also mentioned that this would be an internship and/or practicum opportunity. So I'm not sure what she meant, seeing as I have 1 more semester of undergrad left.

As far as the weakness question, my boss suggested that I say something like: "I have the tendency to to take on too many projects and maybe stretch myself too thin, such as when I worked at a bank (I was a teller), took 16 hours of classes, and on the exec board of different clubs." Then I could turn it into a positive saying that this shows that I am ambitious and like to take the initiative on things! I thought that sounded pretty good, so I was going to use it tomorrow. What do you all think? Thanks.

I've heard of that strategy for an answer to the weakness question. Personally I don't like your "turn it into a postive" thing. Of course, I am a realist and hate it when people BS on interviews. If you mentioned biting off more than you can chew, then I'd be more interested in hearing about how you have learned to manage your time better for future projects than "turning it into a positive" about your high ambition (which everyone will present themselves as having and comes off as fluff).

Just my $.02
 

paramour

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2007
1,977
7
Status (Visible)
Thanks for the response Erg! I'll work on on a good response to the weakness/strength question.

Yes, as thewesternsky stated I'm currently in undergrad, sorry for the confusion! Although, in the email she also mentioned that this would be an internship and/or practicum opportunity. So I'm not sure what she meant, seeing as I have 1 more semester of undergrad left.

As far as the weakness question, my boss suggested that I say something like: "I have the tendency to to take on too many projects and maybe stretch myself too thin, such as when I worked at a bank (I was a teller), took 16 hours of classes, and on the exec board of different clubs." Then I could turn it into a positive saying that this shows that I am ambitious and like to take the initiative on things! I thought that sounded pretty good, so I was going to use it tomorrow. What do you all think? Thanks.

It always sounds good, but . . .

1. I hear LOTS of folks use variations of this (whether they mean it or not).
2. Okay, so you stretch yourself too thin, but it's a positive because it means you're ambitious. How do you intend to counter that if they think you may be stretching yourself too thin now and don't have enough time to properly spend at their site? Perhaps they read it as you're too overly ambitious, you have too much going on, and you need to pick your projects more carefully. Be careful with your rationale on these.

G'luck! :luck:
 

AcronymAllergy

Neuropsychologist
Volunteer Staff
10+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2010
8,202
3,196
Status (Visible)
  1. Psychologist
I've heard of that strategy for an answer to the weakness question. Personally I don't like your "turn it into a postive" thing. Of course, I am a realist and hate it when people BS on interviews. If you mentioned biting off more than you can chew, then I'd be more interested in hearing about how you have learned to manage your time better for future projects than "turning it into a positive" about your high ambition (which everyone will present themselves as having and comes off as fluff).

Just my $.02

I agree with Pragma, paramour, and erg: I've seen the "give it a positive spin" advice countless times on job interview-oriented websites, and while it might work in other sectors (or at least it may have in the past when it was a less-publicized strategy), mental health/psychology can be unique in that they actually want to know what your real weaknesses are. Taking on too much can certainly be a weakness, but as others have said, be prepared to discuss the trouble it poses and how you've addressed it rather than how it reflects on your ambition.

Or if taking on too much is a matter of having had difficulties in the past with assertiveness and knowing when/being able to say "no," that's a very valid weakness that you could aptly address and discuss. Just be candid (although don't over-disclose) and humble-yet-confident.
 

CraveMyThoughts

New Member
Apr 19, 2012
6
0
Status (Visible)
Eh, if you do that, then fine. But dont make it up. be carefull about putting too much postive spin on it. Be honest. I weakness is a weakness. We all have them. Dont hide it.

Everything I said was true! I was a bank teller, took all those hours etc, but I do agree that we ALL have weaknesses. When I suggested that I say "I tend to procrastinate at times", he shot that down quick because it was "too negative". Now I'm just confused lol.
 

CraveMyThoughts

New Member
Apr 19, 2012
6
0
Status (Visible)
I've heard of that strategy for an answer to the weakness question. Personally I don't like your "turn it into a postive" thing. Of course, I am a realist and hate it when people BS on interviews. If you mentioned biting off more than you can chew, then I'd be more interested in hearing about how you have learned to manage your time better for future projects than "turning it into a positive" about your high ambition (which everyone will present themselves as having and comes off as fluff).

Just my $.02

I like that. I'll try to see how can I show how I've learned from to manage my time better. Thanks
 

CraveMyThoughts

New Member
Apr 19, 2012
6
0
Status (Visible)
I agree with Pragma, paramour, and erg: I've seen the "give it a positive spin" advice countless times on job interview-oriented websites, and while it might work in other sectors (or at least it may have in the past when it was a less-publicized strategy), mental health/psychology can be unique in that they actually want to know what your real weaknesses are. Taking on too much can certainly be a weakness, but as others have said, be prepared to discuss the trouble it poses and how you've addressed it rather than how it reflects on your ambition.

Or if taking on too much is a matter of having had difficulties in the past with assertiveness and knowing when/being able to say "no," that's a very valid weakness that you could aptly address and discuss. Just be candid (although don't over-disclose) and humble-yet-confident.

GREAT advice, appreciate it. It seems that the consensus so far is that I can discuss how I take on too much but I should just discuss how I've addressed that weakness and how I have improved on it. I think that makes more sense, and I'll try that strategy. I also like your second point!

Thanks all.

Also, just realized I could have responded to all in one post. My bad!
 

docma

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2007
791
260
Status (Visible)
I am on the "interviewer" side of many interviews and have to say that the "I'm too much of a perfectionist" and "I take on too much" or "I am too hard on myself" can each be true, but they become trite because they are used so often and if they are accurate for you and you use them, have some engaging REAL examples. Good interviewers are scent hounds for packaged phrases and self-marketing when it is not genuine or grounded in your own experience that you have truly reflected on and learned something from. I agree that confident-but-humble is where you want to aim. And you are not expected to be incredibly accomplished as an undergrad (even as a grad). Talking about your curiosity and commitment and what drives them, with specific examples will be fine. Talking about your limited experience and relative youth can be done with candor and be appealing if you can also convey that you are not easily frightened, overly sensitive or too judgmental. Mostly, be who you are and convey your interest and trust the process
 

hockey99

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2012
81
22
Status (Visible)
  1. MD/PhD Student
You could answer it by referencing something that wasn't completely objectionable and was something you recognized and are taking an initiative to improve.

For Example:

"One of my weaknesses is my scientific writing ability. After graduating I realized I hadn't had as many experiences in this realm as I wanted, so I volunteered to assist in writing a manuscript with a professor. After X months, I have made strides in areas A & B, but recognize I still need to work on C & D to become as good as I'd like."
 

hockey99

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2012
81
22
Status (Visible)
  1. MD/PhD Student
You may also want to emphasize your understanding and exigence of patient confidentiality (i.e., HIPAA) whenever appropriate.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 9 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.