Is it at all possible?

LoneRising

New Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
5
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
I understand that this doesn't fit into residency issues, but I'm looking for some serious answers here, so I figured I should go to the place where most of the people who are already fully qualified doctors post.
No pun intended for med students or anything.

I've got a passion for medicine, I really want to spend my life helping people. I want to go into the surgical area of medicine, but there's a rather large road block, I'm no good at science, also, the only science that ever really interested me was biology. Am I to understand in this that there is no hope for me becoming a surgeon? :confused:

I'm in the UK in my last year of actual high school, before I do 6th form where I drop all but the subjects required to access the courses I want in university, and at the moment I've got my first out of 2 GCSEs in Science, grade C.

Okay, I'm going sort of off track here, but the question I'm trying to ask is this, Do I have any chance of becoming a doctor at all if I'm not good at science? I suspect the answer is no, but there's no harm in hoping.
:help:
 

HumidBeing

In Memory of Riley Jane
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2007
Messages
18,706
Reaction score
7
This question is better suited for our high school student forum. Experienced and knowledgeable members do visit and answer questions there. :)

Moving to hSDN.
 

saveourpens

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 12, 2008
Messages
851
Reaction score
122
No, you don't have to be naturally "good" at science, whatever that means, to do well in science course. You just have to work hard.
 

Law2Doc

5K+ Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
30,878
Reaction score
10,066
No, you don't have to be naturally "good" at science, whatever that means, to do well in science course. You just have to work hard.

It's going to be tough to get good advice relating to the UK on this board -- it is mostly populated by the US crowd. In the US, you don't have to be a science person to go into medicine -- plenty of folks take no science in college and do a year or two "postbac" program to take the premedical prereqs after they receive their BA/BS. In the UK, as I understand it, you have to select medicine at a much younger age, and there is fairly high attrition -- you can fail out of the medicine track there. So in that case, i suspect you do have to be good at sciences at a much younger age.
 

CScull

Is Positive, O Positive
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
2,891
Reaction score
0
You don't have to be really good at science, but it will be much much harder to do well in classes at the college level if you don't understand the material now. You can choose anything for a major and it won't have a big impact on med schools. You will need to do well though; especially in pre-reqs. Most of these pre-reqs however ARE science based.
 

xnfs93hy

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
2,243
Reaction score
85
You don't have to be really good at science, but it will be much much harder to do well in classes at the college level if you don't understand the material now. You can choose anything for a major and it won't have a big impact on med schools. You will need to do well though; especially in pre-reqs. Most of these pre-reqs however ARE science based.
I was under the impression that all of the med school requisites were science based. Another thing the OP can do is a post bacc program which has already been mentioned.
 

Depakote

Pediatric Anesthesiologist
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2004
Messages
20,793
Reaction score
109
I was under the impression that all of the med school requisites were science based. Another thing the OP can do is a post bacc program which has already been mentioned.

Many med schools require a semester (or two?) of English and some require Calc (some even require Calc II). I guess you could group the latter in with sciences since they calculate math courses in with your science GPA when you apply to med schools.
 

LoneRising

New Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
I'm using this forum because I'm hoping to do my internship or even my studying too in the US.
Anyway, this year I intend to make a vast improvement on my science, I believe I may not have much of an interest in science because no teacher has ever had the time or the want to explain anything to me, I guess I'm going to be spending a lot of time doing science revision this year! :/

Everytime I come on these forums I have another question, if you're on call in the hospital at night, is it quiet? Or is there still a rather fair amount of noise?
 

Law2Doc

5K+ Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
30,878
Reaction score
10,066
Everytime I come on these forums I have another question, if you're on call in the hospital at night, is it quiet? Or is there still a rather fair amount of noise?

Depends what you mean by quiet. It's not noisy in terms of sound volume, just a variety of beeping machines, patient moans/snoring, and various hospital personnel gabbing. But if you mean quiet as opposed to busy, the answer is, it depends. You will have many many nights at the hospital where you get no sleep as a resident. People don't put their health on hold until dawn.

As for your prior question, if you plan to do medical training (as you said "internship") in the US, they it pays to do your college schooling in the US, since a fairly low percentage of non-US students land US residencies.
 
Top