Is that it for surgeons in the near future???

M

MDJatt here

Well, with the advancing robotic technology, most of the ppl. have a say that its gona overpower the surgeons potential of performing a surgery and ultimately is gona take over the job.
But to me that sounds soooooo unscientific and baseless with no logic cuz you can't leave a machine by itself operating a living body.
What do y'all have to say???
 

velo

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MDJatt here said:
Well, with the advancing robotic technology, most of the ppl. have a say that its gona overpower the surgeons potential of performing a surgery and ultimately is gona take over the job.
But to me that sounds soooooo unscientific and baseless with no logic cuz you can't leave a machine by itself operating a living body.
What do y'all have to say???
those robots don't perform the procedures on their own you realize...
 
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M

MDJatt here

velo said:
those robots don't perform the procedures on their own you realize...
well yea but wat i mean to say is if the surgeon is not physically present right there besides the patient, anything in hell can go wrong, well i think u get what i mean
 
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velo

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MDJatt here said:
well yea but wat i mean to say is if the surgeon is not physically present right there besides the patient, anything in hell can go wrong, well i think u get what i mean
The surgeon is usually in the next room or in the same room at a little control station. Just like laparoscopic procedures, any procedure using some sort of robotic device would be prepped so that it could be converted to a standard, open procedure if need be. That said, robots aren't in very wide use at all for all the early enthusiasm about them. I really don't understand the point of this thread, its not like surgeons would be "replaced" :confused:
 
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M

MDJatt here

velo said:
The surgeon is usually in the next room or in the same room at a little control station. Just like laparoscopic procedures, any procedure using some sort of robotic device would be prepped so that it could be converted to a standard, open procedure if need be. That said, robots aren't in very wide use at all for all the early enthusiasm about them. I really don't understand the point of this thread, its not like surgeons would be "replaced" :confused:
well even i dun think surgeons are ever gona be replaced by robots in the near future, but i jus wanted to pursue this thread in order to have sum viewpoints, THAT'S IT!!!
 

velo

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riiiiight....
 

tncekm

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footcramp

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robots will never replace surgeons because of one reason. human bodies are not like automobiles that are all exactly the same. fortunately for the surgeon, the human body is a sum of millions of years of screwed up genetics resulting in an endless variety of screwed up anatomy and physiology. take gallbladder removal for example. thanks to the wisdom of mother nature there are a ton of variations in the biliary anatomy. try programming that in a robot.

that being said i think medical doctors will be replaced by robots before surgeons.
 
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M

MDJatt here

footcramp said:
robots will never replace surgeons because of one reason. human bodies are not like automobiles that are all exactly the same. fortunately for the surgeon, the human body is a sum of millions of years of screwed up genetics resulting in an endless variety of screwed up anatomy and physiology. take gallbladder removal for example. thanks to the wisdom of mother nature there are a ton of variations in the biliary anatomy. try programming that in a robot.

that being said i think medical doctors will be replaced by robots before surgeons.
Decent answer......... :thumbup:
 

Happy613

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On my surgery rotation I scrubbed in on a few Da Vinci robotic surgeries. They were amazing, and I even got to sit in the counsel on one. Robotic and telerobotic surgery is going to be a very innovative field, however it is highly dependent on having a well trained physician behind the controls.

Robotic surgery will not replace surgeons, it will however help them to preform less invasive, more accurate surgeries. Primarily the Da vinci robot allows for seven degrees of freedom in movement with its robotic arms. This allows the surgoen to preform complex laproscopic tasks that previoulsy required an open procedure. Conventional laproscopic surgery is limited by the "fulcrum effect" which means moving the tool "up" produces a movement of the insturment "down." (Its like playstation with the axis inverted) While this is a bit oversimplified, it is one of the drawbacks of laproscopic surgery.

Robotic surgery eliminates this "fulcrum effect." Also the Da Vinci machine counsel enables a 3-D mage to be shown to the user which allows for depth perception. In any case its a super cool field:)
 

Miami_med

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Happy613 said:
On my surgery rotation I scrubbed in on a few Da Vinci robotic surgeries. They were amazing, and I even got to sit in the counsel on one. Robotic and telerobotic surgery is going to be a very innovative field, however it is highly dependent on having a well trained physician behind the controls.

Robotic surgery will not replace surgeons, it will however help them to preform less invasive, more accurate surgeries. Primarily the Da vinci robot allows for seven degrees of freedom in movement with its robotic arms. This allows the surgoen to preform complex laproscopic tasks that previoulsy required an open procedure. Conventional laproscopic surgery is limited by the "fulcrum effect" which means moving the tool "up" produces a movement of the insturment "down." (Its like playstation with the axis inverted) While this is a bit oversimplified, it is one of the drawbacks of laproscopic surgery.

Robotic surgery eliminates this "fulcrum effect." Also the Da Vinci machine counsel enables a 3-D mage to be shown to the user which allows for depth perception. In any case its a super cool field:)
I cast Fire 1
 

Vox Animo

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No matter what, you always need trained people on some leff. Robotic surgeries just mean there wil be less in the room.

Besides, not everybody will be able to afford robots.

IF they can elimanate doctors jobs, then they could eliminate just about anyjob, we're probably last off the sinking ship.
 

Igor4sugry

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The overpowering effect that some think robotic technology will have on the surgeons results from too much hype about new technology. We hear this all the time when something new comes out. It makes sense for a company to market its product as aggressively as possible, which includes generalizations and predictions for the future.
 

San_Juan_Sun

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but how does a surgeon controlling a robot take away surgeon's jobs? There's no way these robots are on autopilot.

I would also guess that if this kind of surgery has real promise, the minimally invasive folks will be in even more demand, not less.
 
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