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is there any way to change residency programs

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docu

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i hate the fact my chances are next to nothing of getting into residency. isn't there anything that can be done for people like me who have already done some residency but didn't get to finish? why is it the end of the road? that is so unfair. can residency programs change? i am not a bad doctor and i am licensed and seeing patients as a visiting doctor, patients like me, but i want to be able to finish residency. is that so wrong? im sick of my life being such an epic fail, while everyone else has success. i dont know what i did to deserve any of this. i know there are people in my shoes. why does residency have to be such a dead end street like that? a lot of good doctors are being thrown away.

what can be done to change residency programs and make them accept residents from a past program? can there be a mediation program into place for those docs that get kicked out of residency? i think something really has to change. it is not just me it is thousands of residents per year that this happens to. it is so sad. whats even more ridiculous is people try to make it taboo to talk about but i think it is time to talk about it.

also, maybe in the least, congress could allow GP's to work in hospitals, because they let less qualified NPs and PAs work in hospitals. i see that as very unfair. maybe being a GP could be more palatable if they had more opportunity just like an NP or PA. Will we have to tell this to congress or can we just have hospitals start doing so?

p.s. no personal attacks please. im talking about an issue that happens to many people so talk about it in general.
 
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i hate the fact my chances are next to nothing of getting into residency. isn't there anything that can be done for people like me who have already done some residency but didn't get to finish? why is it the end of the road? that is so unfair. can residency programs change? i am not a bad doctor and i am licensed and seeing patients as a visiting doctor, patients like me, but i want to be able to finish residency. is that so wrong? im sick of my life being such an epic fail, while everyone else has success. i dont know what i did to deserve any of this. i know there are people in my shoes. why does residency have to be such a dead end street like that? a lot of good doctors are being thrown away.

what can be done to change residency programs and make them accept residents from a past program? can there be a mediation program into place for those docs that get kicked out of residency? i think something really has to change. it is not just me it is thousands of residents per year that this happens to. it is so sad. whats even more ridiculous is people try to make it taboo to talk about but i think it is time to talk about it.

p.s. no personal attacks please. im talking about an issue that happens to many people so talk about it in general.

Take this as you may docu...you've posted some form of this comment at least a dozen times to the point that most of us that frequent the site are well aware your story. I'm sorry that you haven't been able to find a residency but lets review what you have been doing: 1) you left were dismissed from more than one residency 2) following this you haven't improved your CV by doing research, observerships,etc but instead had a home health care company and now a clinic doc. On top of that your scores weren't stellar from what I remember. With an increase in fresh grads each year with small increases in available spots, why would a program choose to take a chance on you when they have the option of selecting someone without the black marks you have on your CV. At this point, you have to make your CV far exceed that of the average applicant or you have to ingratiate yourself into a program somehow (free research fellow, etc). That's the only way I see you ever getting back into residency and even then its a long-shot. No one is guaranteed a residency or the chance to complete a residency; if you screw up, there are consequences and unfortunately you are suffering those. It's not nice, but based on what you have told us over the years, it appears it was fair based on your conduct.

I think you overstretch when you say there are thousands of a residents per year; there are certainly some this happens to but you are in the vast minority with 10,000+ spots per year being available. You suggest mediation, etc; who pays for this and why? each institution is given control over their programs with the ACGME reviewing programs. System works well for 98%+ of residents; also, it has been my experience (having trained and worked at a few institutions) that when issues with residents come up, there are several avenues available before a resident is dismissed unless something happens that is completely egregious.

Best of luck to you, I hope you do get into a residency but that being said i think your chances are slim to none unless you address the failures of your past and actually accept what your failures were, try to establish a relationship with your former programs so they dont give other programs a bad impression if contacted, and finally improve your CV to make yourself a candidate whose CV outweighs the huge black marks already on it.
 

ForbiddenComma

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i hate the fact my chances are next to nothing of getting into residency. isn't there anything that can be done for people like me who have already done some residency but didn't get to finish? why is it the end of the road? that is so unfair. can residency programs change? i am not a bad doctor and i am licensed and seeing patients as a visiting doctor, patients like me, but i want to be able to finish residency. is that so wrong? im sick of my life being such an epic fail, while everyone else has success. i dont know what i did to deserve any of this. i know there are people in my shoes. why does residency have to be such a dead end street like that? a lot of good doctors are being thrown away.

Careful man... don't try to use these boards as a therapist's couch. It never ends well.

It is impossible to continue onto any residency if your former PD decides he/she does not want you to. PDs generally do not have any sort of oversight or appeal process worth mentioning and can and GME careers by simple fiat, as there is a agreement amongst all PDs in the American system not to hire someone if another PD has blackballed them. It has absolutely nothing to do with a doc's abilities. I agree it is unfair, but that is life, and there is no point to complaining about it.

Take comfort in what you do have. Apparently you are licensed in at least one state and are able to see patients to make a living. Many victims of malignant PDs cannot say that.
 

ForbiddenComma

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Take this as you may docu...you've posted some form of this comment at least a dozen times to the point that most of us that frequent the site are well aware your story. I'm sorry that you haven't been able to find a residency but lets review what you have been doing: 1) you left were dismissed from more than one residency 2) following this you haven't improved your CV by doing research, observerships,etc but instead had a home health care company and now a clinic doc.

I don't know his specifics, but in his defense, it is pretty tough to do research or observerships when you are also working full-time in a clinic. I would if I had the opportunity, don't get me wrong, but it's hard to justify the time spent on some observership when I could be at the clinic, earning to support my child... or spending time with said child.

Also, I have learned far more clinical medicine pulling myself up by the bootstraps as an attending than I did as an intern at a subpar program, or could have following some uninterested doc around as an unpaid observer.
 

Law2Doc

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I think you overstretch when you say there are thousands of a residents per year; there are certainly some this happens to but you are in the vast minority with 10,000+ spots per year being available...

yeah, I think saying the number is thousands per year is not likely. Maybe hundreds I could buy, but even then I'd want to see the numbers. But more importantly, the people in these hundreds are not similarly situated. Some may have been unfairly terminated, but a lot were given chance after chance, or posed some real danger to patient care. So the biggest mistake I think someone in your (OP) position could do is try to lump these people together. You can't build a raft by tying lots of lead anchors to your lumber. You need to disassociate from all the people we know that were legitimately thrown out for good reason. So to the extent you advocate for group action rather than just advocate for your own unique case ( which you should play up as unique, not one of thousands) you take on the stink of every unprofessional dangerous resident that ever got thrown out. If you say you are all similarly situated, and yet the one or two we know personally shouldn't have ever been a resident, it's hard to see your side. Cut all the others loose or you sink with them, some are really really bad cancers.
 
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I don't know his specifics, but in his defense, it is pretty tough to do research or observerships when you are also working full-time in a clinic. I would if I had the opportunity, don't get me wrong, but it's hard to justify the time spent on some observership when I could be at the clinic, earning to support my child... or spending time with said child.

Also, I have learned far more clinical medicine pulling myself up by the bootstraps as an attending than I did as an intern at a subpar program, or could have following some uninterested doc around as an unpaid observer.

Unfortunately, its not residencies jobs to figure out how to make your life work. You had a child before you were done with training which is your right, but then you can't complain that it keeps you from doing what you need to do to obtain a residency. Making money is important but if you want to increase your chance at residency you have to take a step back and see the big picture and be willing to enhance your CV at the expense of your bank account though things like research fellowships and observerships at programs you think you have a chance at.

As for being an attending, it's scary to think that physicians who only made it through internship or didn't even complete an internship are practicing independently. Those of us who have gone through residency will tell you one year is insufficient training and you are learning on the fly without a safety net which is dangerous for patients particularly in the setting that physicians who haven't completed residency tend to practice.
 

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This question, with very little variation, has been posed on multiple occasions and could have continued in one of the previous threads that the OP has started. Given that, this thread is being closed.
 
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