Dec 4, 2020
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By the time of applying, I will have completed a 140 hr individually funded research project and done a local undergraduate poster presentation in biology. I will have also racked up 160 hrs starting my biomedical research project with the medical school on my campus. For a total of about 300 hrs when I apply.

The summer of applying I will be starting my intense 3-semester biomedical project -- working on a final thesis, 5-6 presentations on my work, fully funded through individual grants I apply for, etc. This will continue through my senior year, totaling about 650 more hours.
During this, I will also be continuing doing individual research projects with the biology department -- more casual: 240 hrs more senior year and 1-2 more presentations.

By the time of matriculation, I will have a total of about 1200 hrs of research and about 8 presentations -- however by my application date, I will only have completed 300 hrs or 25% and 1 presentation. Does this look bad? Is this enough for competitive research schools?
 

spottedcory

2+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2018
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I had like 500 hours, 800 hours counting a class that I put on my activities lol, with 1 chill school poster presentation, and I was told in an interview that I had "a lot of research" and was admitted by two strong research schools. Going into the app cycle I thought I had pretty weak research for the schools I've gotten interest from, so given this you're good as long as you can talk about what you did in interviews (I had to learn and spend a lot of time to make an explanation for interviews because I didn't understand well, but it worked!)
 
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Aug 20, 2019
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For schools that don't care much about research, you're golden. For top research schools, I think you're in trouble. Projected hours mean little as many will assume you could drop out of the project.
 
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Aug 20, 2019
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I had like 500 hours, 800 hours counting a class that I put on my activities lol, with 1 chill school poster presentation, and I was told in an interview that I had "a lot of research" and was admitted by two strong research schools. Going into the app cycle I thought I had pretty weak research for the schools I've gotten interest from, so given this you're good as long as you can talk about what you did in interviews (I had to learn and spend a lot of time to make an explanation for interviews because I didn't understand well, but it worked!)
Your signature line includes a LM score of 80+ and WARS of 85+. Stats forgive a lot.
 
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spottedcory

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Aug 17, 2018
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Your signature line includes a LM score of 80+ and WARS of 85+. Stats forgive a lot.
I figured there's diminishing returns for stats and schools with LMs of 75+ might be looking for something else (like research). My point was also that OP's amount of research is "enough" because the schools of interest will likely need a little more of something else anyway, whether that be stats or whatever
 
Feb 5, 2020
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300 hours should be enough as long as you can eloquently explain your research project. If you have a publication or even a major conference attendance, it will look much better.
 

longhaul3

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Feb 29, 2016
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Honestly any amount of research is enough research. Even none is enough. It just depends on what else you have going for you.

I went to a school that is universally considered a top research school with absolutely zero experience or even interest in research. When I was reviewing applications for that school, this amount would have been more than enough to impress me. With that box checked in my head as an interviewer I'd be moving on to the rest of your application.
 
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Jun 24, 2020
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"Enough" is a very relative term. I doubt if anyone here can categorically state if something is good enough or not, because the admissions process is not straightforward by any means. Having said that, not just the hours, but the content also matters. Not just the content, but the areas of research also matters. If all these are in line with what the adcom likes, then you are good. In my case for instance, two types of research - one core medical and one supportive area, neither seem to have aroused interest from the so-called research-centric top schools. But in all the interviews I have had, my research was very fondly discussed. Bottom line - pursue your passion. There is no one thing that will make or break your application by itself. You are doing great. Continue it. Good luck.
 
Mar 22, 2020
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this is n=1, but I have done paid research the last three years and have multiple co-authorships on high-impact publications. Have received II at 15/top 20-25 us news research-heavy schools. I’ve done 8 of these interviews so far and have spent only about 2 minutes total I think speaking about research - 1 min at Mayo, 1 min at wash u. I don’t think md schools care about research as much as people think (well, at least the interviewers). As long as you have an elevator speech on your research and can go into the weeds if needed you should be set.

remember, you determine what the focus of your application is. Research was one of my most meaningful but I didn’t make it the main priority of why I want to be a CLINICIAN whenever I give the “tell me about yourself” spiel. These interviews are already so short so during that first tell me about yourself question you can manipulate the ebb and flow of the subsequent conversation if you know how to.
 
Jun 24, 2020
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this is n=1, but I have done paid research the last three years and have multiple co-authorships on high-impact publications. Have received II at 15/top 20-25 us news research-heavy schools. I’ve done 8 of these interviews so far and have spent only about 2 minutes total I think speaking about research - 1 min at Mayo, 1 min at wash u. I don’t think md schools care about research as much as people think (well, at least the interviewers). As long as you have an elevator speech on your research and can go into the weeds if needed you should be set.

remember, you determine what the focus of your application is. Research was one of my most meaningful but I didn’t make it the main priority of why I want to be a CLINICIAN whenever I give the “tell me about yourself” spiel. These interviews are already so short so during that first tell me about yourself question you can manipulate the ebb and flow of the subsequent conversation if you know how to.
Well - now that you say this, just as recent as yesterday, one of the interviewers said "Med school is not UG. You will not have much time during your rotations for research. But all other years, you can do research".
 
Mar 22, 2020
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Well - now that you say this, just as recent as yesterday, one of the interviewers said "Med school is not UG. You will not have much time during your rotations for research. But all other years, you can do research".
They were probably referring to clinical research. Clinical research can be done during dedicated breaks (eg summer) and then continued during subsequent years as long as you’ve learned to adequately manage your school work.

Unless you have a basic science background or take a year off you won’t be able to easily pick that up during medical school IMO, even then you are very unlikely to get a first-author paper, or even a co-authorship is not guaranteed unless your PI gets you on a project that is almost completed and close to being submitted or under revision.
 

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