1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Hey Guest! Check out the 3 MCAT Study Plan Options listed in the 'stickies' area at the top of the forums (BoomBoom, SN2ed, and MCATJelly). Let us know which you like best.

    Also, we now offer a MCAT Test-Prep Exhibitions Forum where you can ask questions directly from the test-prep services.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. This forum is for support and discussion only. Please promote test prep materials/services (including AMAs) in the Special Offers subforum only. Thanks!
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Is this overkill?

Discussion in 'MCAT: Medical College Admissions Test' started by bluepeach9, Aug 4, 2015.

  1. bluepeach9

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2014
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    43
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I keep noticing terms in the Kaplan vs TPR vs Khan materials that are different/don't match. So now I'm all worried that I am still weak on PSYC/SOC review because I am constantly having to re-learn new terms! For example, the Kaplan books have terms that are not mentioned anywhere in the TPR books…

    I've already read through the TPR books and studied all my notes on every single Khan P/S video twice. Do I need to read the entire Kaplan Psyc. book as well now or would that be overkill?

    How do I know if I'm ready?? Too many terms…:(
     
  2. dushash

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2015
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    166
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Just keep with 1 source - the better one for Psych/Soc. And only glance over terms and summary in other sources. If you did Khan P/S - then just read Concept Summary in Kaplan P/S and if there is some terms that you have no idea of - only then go and read about it in Kaplan. It's just my way of doing things - as I know from experience that dissipating your attention to many sources is counterproductive.
     

Share This Page